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Institute of Medicine (US) Committee to Review the Federal Response to the Health Effects Associated with the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill; Goldman L, Mitchell A, Patlak M, editors. Review of the Proposal for the Gulf Long-Term Follow-Up Study: Highlights from the September 2010 Workshop. Washington (DC): National Academies Press (US); 2010.

Cover of Review of the Proposal for the Gulf Long-Term Follow-Up Study

Review of the Proposal for the Gulf Long-Term Follow-Up Study: Highlights from the September 2010 Workshop.

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Planning for Lower Enrollment

Many participants questioned the 70 percent enrollment figure given for the GuLF study, which they viewed as being overly optimistic, given that enrollment in the World Trade Center Registry was less than half that. In addition, many Gulf of Mexico oil spill cleanup workers have already moved to other areas and will be difficult to locate. The lack of trust of the government that many in the local community have after being disappointed in how the government responded to the Hurricane Katrina disaster will also impede enrollment. Although different government agencies were involved in response the hurricane, to many in the area, the government is a monolithic institution, some participants pointed out. Robert Wallace added that additional factors will impede enrollment, including other ongoing studies of health and economic effects, foreign national and undocumented worker status, general and health illiteracy, the existence of a mobile group of young males who traditionally have lower rates of participation in surveys, and legal claims related to BP or government programs.

Dr. Wallace suggested considering doing a formal pretest of recruitment with oil spill cleanup workers from the different cultural groups and communities affected and, if recruiting does not go well, considering the use of alternative sampling methods. He suggested planning for lower rates of enrollment, response, and retention. Roberta Ness added that it is critical to compare the population of interest to those who choose to participate in the GuLF study.

Copyright © 2010, National Academy of Sciences.
Bookshelf ID: NBK50899

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