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  • This publication is provided for historical reference only and the information may be out of date.

This publication is provided for historical reference only and the information may be out of date.

Cover of The Management of Pressure Ulcers in Primary and Secondary Care

The Management of Pressure Ulcers in Primary and Secondary Care

A Clinical Practice Guideline

NICE Clinical Guidelines, No. 29

.

London: Royal College of Nursing (UK); .

Excerpt

The Royal College of Nursing (RCN) and National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE or the Institute) collaborated to develop a clinical guideline on the management of pressure ulcers in primary and secondary care. Identification of the topic emerged from a consultation process with RCN members and referral of the topic by the Department of Health and Welsh Assembly Government. This document describes the methods used for developing the guidelines and presents the resulting recommendations. It is the source document for the NICE (abbreviated version for health professionals) and Information for the public (patient and carer) versions of the guidelines, which will be published by NICE. The Guideline was produced by a multidisciplinary Guideline Development Group (GDG) and the development process was wholly undertaken by the RCN.

The main areas examined by the Guideline are: holistic assessment for the risk of delayed healing or complications of having a pressure ulcer; the ulcer assessment; pressure-relieving support surfaces for the treatment of pressure ulcers; mobility, positioning and re-positioning for the treatment of pressure ulcers; dressings and topical agents for the treatment of pressure ulcers; debridement for the treatment of pressure ulcers; nutritional support; surgery for the treatment of pressure ulcers; therapeutic ultrasound for the treatment of pressure ulcers; electrotherapy and electromagnetic therapy for the treatment of pressure ulcers; and topical negative pressure for the treatment of pressure ulcers.

Contents

This Guideline should be read in conjunction with the NICE guideline for risk assessment and prevention of pressure ulcers (beds, mattresses and support surfaces) (NICE, 2003) and is a further addition to clinical guidelines forming the Wound Care Suite.

Other relevant guidelines and documents:

Nutritional support in adults: oral supplements, enteral and parental feeding. Currently out for public consultation and can be found at the following link: http://www​.nice.org.uk/page.aspx?o=33921

National Service Framework for children, young people and maternity services (2004) DH. http://www​.dh.gov.uk​/PolicyAndGuidance/HealthAndSocialCareTopics​/ChildrenServices​/ChildrenServicesInformation​/ChildrenServicesInformationArticle​/fs/en?CONTENT_ID​=4089111&chk=U8Ecln

National Service Framework for older people (2001) DH. http://www​.dh.gov.uk​/PublicationsAndStatistics​/Publications/PublicationsPolicyAndGuidance​/PublicationsPAmpGBrowsableDocument​/fs/en?CONTENT_ID​=4096710&chk=yLadyI

Where the term “carer” is used in the Guideline, this refers to unpaid carers as opposed to paid carers such as care workers.

This work was undertaken by the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) Quality Improvement Programme (QIP), and the Guideline Development Group (GDG) convened to develop the Guideline. Funding for the health economics analysis of this Guideline was received from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE), and this work was undertaken by the Centre for Health Economics (CHE) at the University of York. The RCN is host to the National Collaborating Centre for Nursing and Supportive Care (NCC-NSC) which receives partnership support from the: Centre for Evidence-Based Nursing; Centre for Statistics in Medicine; Clinical Effectiveness Forum for Allied Health Professionals; College of Health; Health Care Libraries (University of Oxford); Health Economics Research Centre; and UK Cochrane Centre.

Disclaimer: Clinical guidelines have been defined as systematically developed statements that are designed to assist clinicians, patients and carers in making decisions about appropriate treatments for specific conditions and aspects of care.

As with all clinical guidelines, recommendations may not be appropriate for use in all circumstances. Decisions to adopt any particular recommendations must be made by the practitioners in the light of: available resources, local services, policies and protocols, the patient’s circumstances and wishes, available personnel and support surfaces, clinical experience of the practitioner, and knowledge of more recent research findings.

When implementing evidence-based guidance it is important that all health care professionals understand the local context in which they work and existing quality improvement structures.

Copyright © 2005, Royal College of Nursing.
Bookshelf ID: NBK49010PMID: 21698844

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