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Cover of Drug Class Review: Beta Adrenergic Blockers

Drug Class Review: Beta Adrenergic Blockers

Final Report Update 4

Drug Class Reviews

, MD, MPH, , MS, , PhD, , MLS, and , MPA:HA.

Drug Effectiveness Review Project, Marian McDonagh, PharmD, Principal Investigator, Oregon Evidence-based Practice Center, Oregon Health & Science University, Mark Helfand, MD, MPH, Director
Portland (OR): Oregon Health & Science University; .

Beta blockers inhibit the chronotropic, inotropic, and vasoconstrictor responses to the catecholamines, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. Beta blockers differ in their duration of effect (3 hours to 22 hours), the types of beta receptors they block (β1-selective or β1/β2-nonselective), whether they are simultaneously capable of exerting low level heart rate increases (intrinsic sympathomimetic activity [ISA]), and in whether they provide additional blood vessel dilation effects by also blocking alpha-1 receptors. All beta blockers are approved for the treatment of hypertension. Other US Food and Drug Administration-approved uses are specific to each beta blocker and include stable and unstable angina, atrial arrhythmias, bleeding esophageal varices, coronary artery disease, asymptomatic and symptomatic heart failure, migraine, and secondary prevention of post-myocardial infarction. The objective of this review was to evaluate the comparative effectiveness and harms of beta blockers in adult patients with hypertension, angina, coronary artery bypass graft, recent myocardial infarction, heart failure, atrial arrhythmia, migraine or bleeding esophageal varices.

Contents

Update 3: September 2007
Update 2: May 2005
Update 1: September 2004
Original Report date: September 2003

The medical literature relating to this topic is scanned periodically. (See http://www.ohsu.edu/ohsuedu/research/policycenter/DERP/about/methods.cfm for description of scanning process). Prior versions of this report can be accessed at the DERP website.

The Drug Effectiveness Review Project, composed of 15 organizations including 14 state Medicaid agencies and the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technology in Health commissioned and funded for this report. These organizations selected the topic of the report and had input into its Key Questions. The content and conclusions of the report were entirely determined by the Evidence-based Practice Center researchers. The authors of this report have no financial interest in any company that makes or distributes the products reviewed in this report.

Suggested citation:

Helfand M, Peterson K, Christensen V, Dana T, Thakurta S. Drug class review: Beta adrenergic blockers. Update 4. 2009. http://www.ohsu.edu/drugeffectiveness/reports/final.cfm.

The purpose of this report is to make available information regarding the comparative effectiveness and safety profiles of different drugs within pharmaceutical classes. Reports are not usage guidelines, nor should they be read as an endorsement of, or recommendation for, any particular drug, use, or approach. Oregon Health & Science University does not recommend or endorse any guideline or recommendation developed by users of these reports.

Copyright © 2009, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon.
Bookshelf ID: NBK47172PMID: 21089245

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