Table 46Nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses with days away from work, job transfer, or restriction, by industry: United States, 2003–2007

[Data are based on employer records from a sample of business establishments]

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Injuries and illnesses with days away from work, job transfer, or restriction
Cases per 100 full-time workers1Number of cases in thousands2
Industry20032005200620072003200520062007
Total private sector32.62.42.32.12,301.92,184.82,114.62,036.0
 Agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting43.33.33.22.829.329.527.626.6
 Mining2.02.22.12.011.213.714.014.1
 Utilities2.22.42.22.112.212.911.811.4
 Construction3.63.43.22.8218.0222.5223.7197.5
 Manufacturing3.83.53.33.0538.0490.8473.4427.1
 Wholesale trade2.82.72.52.4147.4146.8140.6139.3
 Retail trade2.72.62.62.5319.6314.2308.6309.1
 Transportation and warehousing5.44.64.34.3204.0185.6176.3179.4
 Information1.11.11.01.130.830.928.329.1
 Finance and insurance0.40.40.30.421.319.117.720.7
 Real estate and rental and leasing2.12.11.81.635.637.133.029.0
 Professional, scientific, and technical services0.60.60.50.536.038.434.531.8
 Management of companies and enterprises1.61.31.10.925.120.817.915.1
 Administrative and support and waste management and remediation services2.42.01.91.896.789.587.089.2
 Educational services1.21.00.91.017.914.814.515.8
 Health care and social assistance3.12.82.72.5337.9318.4310.0303.7
 Arts, entertainment, and recreation2.92.92.52.534.134.128.731.9
 Accommodation and food services2.01.71.71.6135.2120.8124.6119.6
 Other services, except public administration1.71.51.41.551.744.842.445.7
1

Incidence rate calculated as (N/EH) x 200,000, where N = total number of injuries and illnesses, EH = total hours worked by all employees during the calendar year, and 200,000 = base for 100 full-time equivalent employees working 40 hours per week, 50 weeks per year.

2

Because of rounding, components may not add to total number of cases in private sector.

3

Totals include data for industries not shown separately. Excludes self-employed, private households, and employees in federal, state, and local government agencies.

4

Excludes farms with fewer than 11 employees.

NOTES: Starting with 2003 data, the Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses began using the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) to classify establishments by industry. Prior to 2003, the survey used the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. Because of substantial differences between these systems, the data measured by these surveys are not directly comparable. See Appendix II, Industry of employment. Data for previous years are presented in Health, United States, 2004, Table 50. Available from: http://www​.cdc.gov/nchs/hus.htm. See Appendix I, Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses (SOII). Data for additional years are available. See Appendix III.

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses: Workplace injuries and illnesses, 2003–2007 editions. Summary News Release. 2004–2008. Available from: http://www​.bls.gov/iif/home.htm.

From: Trend Tables

Cover of Health, United States, 2009
Health, United States, 2009: With Special Feature on Medical Technology.
National Center for Health Statistics (US) .
Hyattsville (MD): National Center for Health Statistics (US); 2010 Jan.

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