NCBI Bookshelf. A service of the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.

Wise PH, Huffman LC, Brat G. A Critical Analysis of Care Coordination Strategies for Children With Special Health Care Needs. Rockville (MD): Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US); 2007 Jun. (Technical Reviews, No. 14.)

Cover of A Critical Analysis of Care Coordination Strategies for Children With Special Health Care Needs

A Critical Analysis of Care Coordination Strategies for Children With Special Health Care Needs.

Show details

Appendix ASummary of Quality Assessment Criteria*

DomainsCritical Elements
Study questionClearly focused and appropriate question
Study populationDescription of study populations
Comparability of subjects
  • Specific inclusion/exclusion criteria applied to all groups
  • Comparability of groups at baseline
  • Study groups comparable to non-participants with regard to confounding factors
  • Use of concurrent controls
  • Comparability of follow-up among groups at each assessment
Exposure or interventionClear definition and measurement of exposure or intervention
OutcomesClear definition and measurement of outcomes
Statistical proceduresAssessment of confounding factors
ResultsMeasurement of magnitude of effect for outcomes (e.g., odds ratio (OR) or relative risk (RR))
DiscussionConclusions supported by results, with biases and limitations taken into consideration
Project funding or sponsorshipType and source of support for study
*

SOURCE: West S, King V, Carey TS, et al. Systems to Rate the Strength of Scientific Evidence. Evidence Report/Technology Assessment No. 47 (Prepared by the Research Triangle Institute-University of North Carolina Evidence-based Practice Center under Contract No. 290-97-0011). AHRQ Publication No. 02-E016. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. April 2002.

Confounding is the alteration of the effect of one risk factor by the presence of another. Age, gender and socioeconomic status often are confounding factors because children with different values of these may be at differential risk of problem or disease. Confounding can be controlled by restricting inclusion criteria, by matching groups on the confounding factor, or by including the confounding variable in statistical analyses.

††

Specific exposure and outcomes definitions help to address measurement bias, the systematic error that occurs when measurement methods are consistently different between groups in the study.

Views

  • PubReader
  • Print View
  • Cite this Page
  • PDF version of this title (346K)

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...