NCBI Bookshelf. A service of the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (US); Office of the Surgeon General (US). Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General's Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health [Internet]. Washington (DC): US Department of Health and Human Services; 2016 Nov.

Cover of Facing Addiction in America

Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General's Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health [Internet].

Show details
Illustration shows fMRI images comparing the brain of an individual with a history of cocaine use disorder to the brain of an individual without a history of cocaine use. The person who has had a cocaine use disorder has lower levels of the D2 dopamine receptor in the striatum one month and four months after stopping cocaine use compared to the non-user. The level of dopamine receptors in the brain of the cocaine user are higher at the 4-month mark, but have not returned to the levels observed in the non-user.

Figure 2.8Time-Related Decrease in Dopamine Released in the Brain of a Cocaine User

Notes: These fMRI images compare the brain of an individual with a history of cocaine use disorder (middle and right) to the brain of an individual without a history of cocaine use (left). The person who has had a cocaine use disorder has lower levels of the D2 dopamine receptor (depicted in red) in the striatum one month (middle) and four months (right) after stopping cocaine use compared to the non-user. The level of dopamine receptors in the brain of the cocaine user are higher at the 4-month mark (right), but have not returned to the levels observed in the non-user (left).

Source: Modified with permission from Volkow et al., (1993).29

Views

  • Cite this Page
  • PDF version of this title (12M)

Related information

  • PMC
    PubMed Central citations
  • PubMed
    Links to PubMed

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...