Table A.5.1Inclusion/Exclusion Criteria at Screening Stage for Cancer.*

Assessed the effect of omega-3 fatty acids on cancer
Presented research on human subjects; presented research on human subjects and animals for apoptosis, tumor growth, and differentiation questions only.
Reported the results of randomized or controlled clinical trials or prospective cohort studies;† reported the results of review articles and meta-analyses of animal studies and cell culture studies for apoptosis, tumor growth, and differentiation questions only.‡
*

Language was not a barrier to inclusion;

† We defined a randomized controlled trial (RCT) as one in which the participants were assigned to one of two (or more) study groups using a process of random allocation (e.g., random number generation, coin flips); we defined a controlled clinical trial (CCT) as one in which participants were either: (1) assigned to one of two (or more) study groups using a quasi-random allocation method (e.g., alternation, date of birth, patient identifier), or (2) possibly assigned to one of two (or more) study groups using a process of random or quasi-random allocation;

‡ We defined a review article as one that summarizes a number of different studies and may draw conclusions about a particular intervention. The methods used to identify, select and appraise the studies are not systematic or necessarily reproducible. (Any review article that is not clearly a systematic review or a meta-analysis is a “review.”) The summary in a review is generally narrative; We defined a systematic review as a review of a clearly formulated question that uses systematic and explicit methods to identify, select, and critically appraise relevant research, and to collect and analyze data from the studies that are included in the review. Statistical methods are not used to analyze and summarize the results of the included studies; We defined a meta-analysis as a systematic review that uses statistical methods to integrate the results of the individual studies. A meta-analysis contains at least one estimate formed by pooling results across individual studies, i.e., an overall odds ratio.

From: Appendix A. Methodologic Approach

Cover of Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acids on Cancer
Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acids on Cancer.
Evidence Reports/Technology Assessments, No. 113.
MacLean CH, Newberry SJ, Mojica WA, et al.

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