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Swedish Council on Health Technology Assessment (SBU): SBU Systematic Review Summaries [Internet].

Occupational Exposures and Symptoms of Depression and Burnout

Summary and conclusions
SBU Yellow Report No. 223

February 2014

  • Those who experience job strain, i.e. a work situation with low decision latitude (personal control of their own working situation) in combination with too high demands, develop more symptoms of depression over time than people who are not subjected to such exposure at work.
  • Those who experience low social support at work develop more symptoms of depression and burnout over time than people who are not subjected to such exposure at work. Those who are bullied at work, or experience work-place conflicts, develop more symptoms of depression.
  • Those who experience work as mentally stressful; those who experience effort-reward imbalance; or those who experience job insecurity develop more symptoms of depression and burnout over time than people who are not subjected to such exposure at work.
  • In some work environments, people have fewer symptoms. Those who experience high influence over work-related decisions and those who experience work place justice develop fewer symptoms of depression and burnout than others.
  • Women and men with similar occupational exposures develop symptoms of depression and burnout to the same extent.
  • This systematic literature review has uncovered a substantial body of knowledge concerning occupational exposures and symptoms of depression and burnout. Future research should include intervention studies, i.e. studies that scientifically test the effect of well-defined interventions on such symptoms over extended periods of time in authentic work situations.

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Copyright © 2014 by the Swedish Council on Health Technology Assessment. All content unless otherwise noted is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Bookshelf ID: NBK316447, PMID: 26803856

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