Table 160.2Differential Diagnosis of Chronic Monoarthritis

Osteoarthritis: Most often knee
Internal derangement (torn meniscus, osteochondritis, loose body, etc.): Usually knee; history of injury
Synovitis of unknown cause: Usually knee and usually remits in months or a few years
Rheumatoid arthritis: Inflammatory history; always progresses to involve other joints, only more slowly than typical RA
Traumatic synovitis: Usually knee; history of definite trauma
Spondyloarthropathy: See Table 160.3; always progresses to involve other joints, only more slowly than typical spondyloarthropathy
Chondrocalcinosis: Often knee; history suggestive of pseudogout
Chronic infection: Systemic symptoms may occur
Tumor (including pigmented villonodular synovitis): May be rapidly destructive, leading to progressive disability

From: Chapter 160, Arthralgia

Cover of Clinical Methods
Clinical Methods: The History, Physical, and Laboratory Examinations. 3rd edition.
Walker HK, Hall WD, Hurst JW, editors.
Boston: Butterworths; 1990.
Copyright © 1990, Butterworth Publishers, a division of Reed Publishing.

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