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Bhatt DL, editor. Guide to Peripheral and Cerebrovascular Intervention. London: Remedica; 2004.

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Cover of Guide to Peripheral and Cerebrovascular Intervention

Guide to Peripheral and Cerebrovascular Intervention.

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Cerebral vascular venous drainage

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Delicate venous drainage from the cerebral hemispheres emerges from the brain to form small venous structures in the pia mater. These larger venous channels then form cerebral veins, which bridge the subarachnoid space and enter into endothelial-lined sinuses within the dura mater. Small veins from the scalp also communicate with the dural sinus via emissary veins that perforate the skull. The majority of the cerebral convexities ultimately drain into the mid-line structure in the dura mater (the superior sagittal sinus). The superior sagittal sinus courses posteriorly back towards the occiput, where it receives drainage from the straight sinus. The straight sinus itself receives drainage from the inferior sagittal sinus, which courses in the falx cerebri. The inferior margin of the superior sagittal sinus divides into a right and left transverse sinus in the tentorium cerebelli, which is again made up of dura mater. Each transverse sinus curves downward and backward as a sigmoid sinus, and is ultimately drained by each of the internal jugular veins. Venous drainage is often asymmetrical, with the superior sagittal sinus most commonly draining into the right transverse sinus, while the straight sinus usually drains into the left transverse sinus.

The cavernous sinus is an irregular network of venous channels on each side of the sphenoid sinus and sella turcica, extending from the superior orbital fissure to the petrous portion of the temporal bone. The cavernous sinus encloses a segment of the ICA. Each cavernous sinus is connected to the other by a basilar venous plexus. Each cavernous sinus drains posteriorly into the superior and inferior petrosal sinus, which enter the transverse sinus and the bulb of the internal jugular vein (see Figures 16 and 17).

Figure 16. Venous drainage of the brain and skull in a posteroanterior projection.

Figure 16

Venous drainage of the brain and skull in a posteroanterior projection. Venous channels course from the right and left cerebral convexities towards the mid-line to form the superior sagittal sinus, which drains into the right and left transverse sinuses. (more...)

Figure 17. Venous drainage of the brain and skull.

Figure 17

Venous drainage of the brain and skull. The superior sagittal sinus is abbreviated from the mid skull forward (arrow). This is due to either a thrombosis or a congenital anomaly. The superior sagittal sinus predominantly empties into the right transverse (more...)

There is considerable variability in the venous drainage of the brain and skull. There are also numerous interconnections between venous drainage systems. The superior anastomotic vein (vein of Trolard) connects to the superficial middle cerebral vein, which usually empties into the cavernous sinus common with the superior sagittal sinus. The inferior anastomotic vein (vein of Labbé) connects the superficial middle cerebral vein with the transverse sinus.

By agreement with the publisher, this book is accessible by the search feature, but cannot be browsed.

Copyright © 2004, Remedica.
Bookshelf ID: NBK27437

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