NCBI Bookshelf. A service of the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.

Alberts B, Johnson A, Lewis J, et al. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 4th edition. New York: Garland Science; 2002.

  • By agreement with the publisher, this book is accessible by the search feature, but cannot be browsed.
Cover of Molecular Biology of the Cell

Molecular Biology of the Cell. 4th edition.

Show details
Figure 2-3. The abundances of some chemical elements in the nonliving world (the Earth's crust) compared with their abundances in the tissues of an animal.

Figure 2-3The abundances of some chemical elements in the nonliving world (the Earth's crust) compared with their abundances in the tissues of an animal

The abundance of each element is expressed as a percentage of the total number of atoms present in the sample. Thus, for example, nearly 50% of the atoms in a living organism are hydrogen atoms. The survey here excludes mineralized tissues such as bone and teeth, as they contain large amounts of inorganic salts of calcium and phosphorus. The relative abundance of elements is similar in all living organisms.

From: The Chemical Components of a Cell

Copyright © 2002, Bruce Alberts, Alexander Johnson, Julian Lewis, Martin Raff, Keith Roberts, and Peter Walter; Copyright © 1983, 1989, 1994, Bruce Alberts, Dennis Bray, Julian Lewis, Martin Raff, Keith Roberts, and James D. Watson .

Views

  • Cite this Page

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...