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Cover of Dioxins and Dioxin-like Compounds in the Food Supply

Dioxins and Dioxin-like Compounds in the Food Supply

Strategies to Decrease Exposure

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Washington (DC): National Academies Press (US); .

Dioxin and dioxin-like compounds, or DLCs, are found throughout the environment, in soil, water, and air. People are exposed to these unintentional environmental contaminants primarily through the food supply, although at low levels, particularly by eating animal fat in meat, dairy products, and fish. While the amount of DLCs in the environment has declined since the late 1970s, the public continues to be concerned about the safety of the food supply and the potential adverse health effects of DLC exposure, especially in groups such as developing fetuses and infants, who are more sensitive to the toxic effects of these compounds.

Dioxins and Dioxin-like Compounds in the Food Supply: Strategies to Decrease Exposure, recommends policy options to reduce exposure to these contaminants while considering how implementing these options could both reduce health risks and affect nutrition, particularly in sensitive and highly exposed groups, if dietary changes are suggested.

Contents

Support for this project was provided by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Agriculture under contract number 223-99-2321. The views presented in this report are those of the Institute of Medicine Committee on the Implications of Dioxin in the Food Supply and are not necessarily those of the funding agencies.

NOTICE: The project that is the subject of this report was approved by the Governing Board of the National Research Council, whose members are drawn from the councils of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine. The members of the committee responsible for the report were chosen for their special competences and with regard for appropriate balance.

Copyright 2003 by the National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Bookshelf ID: NBK221718PMID: 25057668DOI: 10.17226/10763

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