TABLE E.2 Laryngeal Cancer and Exposure to Asbestos—Case-Control Studies

Reference*Study Population Exposed Cases Estimated RR (95% CI)
Berrino et al. 2003213 male cases of endolaryngeal cancer from six centers in Southern Europe, < 55 years old
      Possible na 1.7 (1.0-3.0)
      Probablena1.8 (0.8-4.0)
      Combined analysis with 100 hypopharyngeal cancer cases
      Asbestos (JEM-derived agent), any exposure215 1.6 (1.0-2.5)
      10+ years duration and 20+ years lag 121 1.4 (0.8-2.4)
      Likelihood of exposure
      Possible 175 1.7 (1.1-2.8)
      Probable 40 1.9 (0.9-3.8)
      Duration of exposure
      < 10 years na 1.3 (0.6-2.7)
      10-19 years na 1.4 (0.7-2.7)
      ≥ 20 yearsna1.7 (0.9-3.0)p-trend > 0.05
      Tertiles of weighted exposure
      1na1.4 (0.8-2.3)
      2na1.9 (1.2-3.2)
      3na1.6 (1.0-2.6)p-trend = 0.037
Dietz et al. 2003 257 laryngeal cancer cases among residents of Rhein-Neckar region, Germany Asbestos 591.3 (0.8-2.1)
Elci et al. 2002940 laryngeal cancer cases among male residents of Istanbul, Turkey (smoking-adjusted)
      Asbestos (JEM-derived agent) 1501.0 (0.8-1.3)
      Glottis 28 0.8 (0.5-1.2)
      Supraglottis 71 1.0 (0.8-1.4)
      Other laryngeal 51 1.2 (0.9-1.7)
      Intensity of exposure
      Low 45 0.9 (0.6-1.3)
      Medium 93 1.2 (0.9-1.6)
      High 120.6 (0.3-1.1)
      Probability of exposure
      Low 121 1.2 (0.9-1.5)
      Medium 20 0.6 (0.4-1.1)
      High 90.7 (0.3-1.5)
Luce et al. 200020 laryngeal cancer cases among male residents of New Caledonia (all smokers)
      Whitewash from tremolite asbestos 30.72 (0.22-2.30)
      Melanesians 2 0.71 (0.14-3.63)
      Non-Melanesians 1 0.60 (0.07-5.22)
Marchand et al. 2000296 laryngeal cancer cases among male residents of six cities in France (smoking-adjusted)
      Any exposure 2161.24 (0.83-1.90)
      Low cumulative exposure 67 1.10 (0.66-1.82)
      Intermediate 72 1.20 (0.73-1.99)
      High 771.47 (0.87-2.46)
      Supraglottic, any exposure 56 1.12 (0.61-2.05)
      Low cumulative exposure 15 0.84 (0.38-1.84)
      Intermediate 22 1.31 (0.62-2.76)
      High 19 1.27 (0.58-2.78)
      Glottic and subglottic, any exposure 75 1.15 (0.68-1.95)
      Low cumulative exposure 27 1.19 (0.62-2.27)
      Intermediate 21 0.90 (0.45-1.78)
      High 27 1.44 (0.73-2.83)
      Epilarynx, any exposure 77 1.77 (0.94-3.30)
      Low cumulative exposure 22 1.45 (0.67-3.13)
      Intermediate 25 1.69 (0.79-3.64)
      High 30 2.22 (1.05-4.71)
De Stefani et al. 1998112 laryngeal cancer cases among male residents of Montevideo, Uruguay (smoking-adjusted)
      Asbestos (self-reported agent)231.8 (0.9-3.2)
      1-20 years 4 0.9 (0.3-2.7)
      20+ years192.4 (1.2-4.8)
      Supraglottic na 2.3 (0.9-5.7)
      Glottic na 2.9 (0.8-10.5)
Gustavsson et al. 1998157 laryngeal cancer cases among male residents of two regions in Sweden
      Asbestos (low) 28 1.21 (0.73-2.02)
      Asbestos (high) 341.69 (1.05-2.74)
      Quartile I 13 1.16 (1.02-1.32)
      Quartile II 15 1.35 (1.04-1.74)
      Quartile III 16 1.56 (1.06-2.30)
      Quartile IV 181.82 (1.08-3.04)p-trend = 0.02
Muscat and Wynder 1992186 laryngeal cancer cases among white, male residents of New York, Illinois, Michigan, and Pennsylvania, US
      Asbestos, any exposure 661.1 (0.7-1.9)
      Glottis 40 1.3 (0.7-2.7)
      Supraglottis 26 1.1 (0.5-2.6)
Wortley et al. 1992235 laryngeal cancer cases among residents of western Washington state, US
      Asbestos—peak
      None 145 1.0
      Low 3 1.2 (0.6-7.1)
      Medium 57 1.3 (0.8-2.0)
      High 301.1 (0.6-1.9)
      Asbestos—duration
      < 1 year 151 1.0
      1-9 50 1.0 (0.5-2.1)
      ≥ 10341.2 (0.6-2.3)
      Asbestos—exposure scores
      < 5 173 1.0
      5-19 25 1.1 (0.6-2.1)
      ≥ 20371.4 (0.7-2.5)
Zheng et al. 1992a201 laryngeal cancer cases among residents of Shanghai, China (smoking-adjusted)
      Asbestos, occupational exposure 262.0 (1.0-4.3)
Ahrens et al. 199185 laryngeal cancer cases among male residents of Bremen, Germany (smoking-adjusted)
      Asbestos na1.1 (0.5-2.4)
Brown et al. 1988180 laryngeal cancer cases among male residents along Gulf Coast of Texas (smoking-adjusted)
      Asbestos 881.5 (1.0-2.2)
      < 5 years 20 1.3 (0.7-2.6)
      5-14 24 2.2 (1.1-4.3)
      ≥ 15401.4 (0.8-2.4)
      unknown 4
Zagraniski et al. 198692 laryngeal cancer cases among white, male residents of New Haven, CT (smoking-adjusted)
      Asbestos workers (ever held occupation) 111.1 (0.4-2.9)
Olsen and Sabroe 1984276 male laryngeal cancer cases among residents of Denmark (smoking-adjusted) Asbestos 171.8 (1.0-3.4)
Burch et al. 1981184 laryngeal cancer cases among male residents of southern Ontario, Canada (smoking-adjusted)
      Self-reported asbestos exposure 36 1.6 (p = 0.069)
      Occupational hygienist classified exposure 142.3 (p = 0.052)
Hinds et al. 197947 laryngeal cancer cases among male residents of three counties in WA; self-reported asbestos exposure
      All subtypes 251.75 (p = 0.21)
      Glottis na 1.29 (p = 0.63)
      Supraglottis na 4.00 (p = 0.22)
Shettigara and Morgan 197543 laryngeal cancer cases among male hospital patients in Toronto, Canada Asbestos 10 (0 exposed controls)
Stell and McGill 1973100 laryngeal cancer cases among male hospital patients in Liverpool, UK Asbestos 3114.53 (4.27-49.43)a

NOTES: CI = Confidence interval; na = not available; RR = relative risk. Data points included in meta-analyses are bolded.

*

Full citations can be found in the reference list for Chapter 6.

a

OR and 95% CI calculated with standard methods from observed numbers of exposed cases and controls in original paper.

From: E, Case-Control Results Tables

Cover of Asbestos
Asbestos: Selected Cancers.
Institute of Medicine (US) Committee on Asbestos: Selected Health Effects.
Washington (DC): National Academies Press (US); 2006.
Copyright © 2006, National Academy of Sciences.

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