Disaster Preparedness, Response, and Recovery Considerations for Children and Families: A Workshop

June 10-11, 2013

  • Keck Center, Room 100
  • 500 Fifth Street, NW
  • Washington DC 20001

Background

Communities across the United States face the threat of disasters almost every day, both large and small. Children represent nearly 25 percent of the U.S. population, but current state and local preparedness plans often do not include specific considerations for pediatric populations and families. The preparedness and resilience of communities related to children will require a systems framework for disaster preparedness across traditional and nontraditional medical and public health stakeholders, including community organizations, schools, and other partners in municipal planning.

This workshop will examine medical and public health preparedness related to children and families, including children with special health care needs. The workshop will review already existing tools and frameworks that can be modified to include pediatric needs, as well as partnerships and organizations with vested interest that can be leveraged in planning to improve outcomes and allow for pediatric considerations to be integrated throughout local and state emergency plans. A special focus on resilience and recovery will highlight best practices already being employed specifically for children, and what opportunities exist to explore successful recovery strategies further.

Meeting Objectives

  • Discuss progress being made in different sectors around the country related to the 2010 National Commission Recommendations and opportunities for integrating related pediatric work into local and state planning efforts.
  • Discuss opportunities to augment children's benefits by leveraging existing coalitions.
    • Explore coalition challenges and successes from federal, state, local, and provider perspectives.
  • Describe opportunities to strengthen public health partnerships to address the needs of children and families.
  • Understand barriers and challenges to better financial systems related to pediatric preparedness.
    • Discuss importance of health care financing education among stakeholders.
    • Consider strategies to reduce the financial burden on public health and health care facilities.
  • Emphasize different capabilities needed for mass care and sheltering to provide for families and children with special health care needs.
  • Examine resilience strategies that lead to successful recovery in children after a disaster.
  • Understand current approaches and interventions to improve recovery in children after any type of emergency or disaster.

DAY ONE June 10, 2013

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Table

Michael R. Anderson, Workshop Chair Vice President and Chief Medical Officer, University Hospitals Case Medical Center

Session I. Progress Made/Highlights from National Commission on Children and Disasters

Session Objectives:

  • Examine highlighted recommendations and gaps identified during the National Commission on Children and Disasters
  • Discuss progress being made in different sectors around the country and opportunities for integrating work into local and state planning efforts
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Table

David Schonfeld Pediatrician-in-Chief, St. Christopher's Hospital for Children

Session II. How Can We Leverage Health Care Coalitions for the Benefit of Children

Session Objectives:

  • Discuss opportunities to augment children's benefits by leveraging existing coalitions
  • Discuss achieving duality of service delivery and level of preparedness to increase capacity every day and not just during disasters
  • Explore coalition challenges and successes from federal, state, local, and provider perspectives
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Table

Andrew C. Rucks, Planning Committee Member Professor, Department of Health Care Organization and Policy

Session III. Opportunities for Integration of Children and Family Needs to State and Local Planning

Session Objectives:

  • Discussing potential alignment of Public Health Emergency Preparedness/Hospital Preparedness Program (PHEP/HPP) capabilities with pediatric planning considerations
  • Describe opportunities to strengthen public health partnerships
  • Exploring cross collaboration with community agencies
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Table

Georgina Peacock, Planning Committee Member Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrician

Session IV. Financing Health Care for Children in Emergencies: Understanding Barriers

Session Objectives:

  • Discuss importance of healthcare financing education among stakeholders
  • Understand barriers and challenges to better financial systems related to pediatric preparedness
  • Consider strategies to reduce the financial burden on public health and health care facilities
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Table

John Wible (Ret.) General Counsel

DAY TWO June 11, 2013

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Table

Michael R. Anderson, Workshop Chair Vice President and Chief Medical Officer, University Hospitals Case Medical Center

SESSION V. Operationalizing Response Considerations for Children

Session Objectives:

  • Discuss child and family specific needs during response phase
  • Emphasize different capabilities needed for mass care and sheltering to provide for families and children with special health care needs
  • Explore best practices and future strategies for comprehensive response plans related to children
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Table

Kari Tatro Executive Vice President

SESSION VI. Fostering Recovery Through Community Resilience

Session Objectives:

  • Examine resilience strategies that lead to successful recovery in children after a disaster
  • Understand connections between pre-event mitigation and post-event recovery for children and families
  • Discuss opportunities for employing community resilience in different community sectors
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Kathryn Brinsfield National Security Staff

SESSION VII. Disaster Recovery with a Focus on Children and Families

Session Objectives:

  • Understand current approaches and interventions to improve recovery in children after any type of emergency or disaster
  • Examine available data and evidenced based methods to promote children's needs
  • Consider importance of measuring recovery through social and economic well-being of children
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LCDR Jonathan White Deputy Director