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Guideline: Use of Multiple Micronutrient Powders for Home Fortification of Foods Consumed by Infants and Children 6–23 Months of Age. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2011.

  • This publication is provided for historical reference only and the information may be out of date.

This publication is provided for historical reference only and the information may be out of date.

Cover of Guideline: Use of Multiple Micronutrient Powders for Home Fortification of Foods Consumed by Infants and Children 6–23 Months of Age

Guideline: Use of Multiple Micronutrient Powders for Home Fortification of Foods Consumed by Infants and Children 6–23 Months of Age.

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Remarks

  • In malaria-endemic areas, the provision of iron should be implemented in conjunction with measures to prevent, diagnose and treat malaria (15).
  • This guideline is not applicable to children with specific conditions such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection or tuberculosis as the effects and safety of the intervention in these specific groups have not been evaluated.
  • Programmes involving the use of multiple micronutrient powders for home fortification of foods should be preceded by an evaluation of the nutritional status among children under 5 years of age and existing measures to control anaemia and vitamin A deficiency, such as hookworm control programmes, the provision of supplements and the use of other products for home fortification of foods and fortified complementary foods, to ensure that the daily micronutrient needs are met and not exceeded.
  • Such programmes should also include a behaviour change communication strategy that promotes: awareness and correct use of the powders along with information on recommended breastfeeding practices; commencement of complementary foods at 6 months of age; preparation of complementary foods at age-appropriate frequency, amounts, consistency and variety (16,17); hand washing with soap and hygienic preparation of food; prompt attention to fever in malaria settings; and measures to manage diarrhoea (18).
  • The selection of the most appropriate delivery platform should be context-specific, with the aim of reaching the least favoured populations and ensuring an adequate and continued supply of the powders.
  • Given the multiple determinants of vitamin and mineral deficiencies and the range of factors affecting successful implementation of the intervention, the provision of multiple micronutrient powders on a larger scale may not produce exactly the same results as observed in the trials informing this guideline.
  • In settings where iron supplementation among this population has been widely implemented and has proved to be effective, a cost-effectiveness analysis is recommended to determine whether the current intervention should be replaced by provision of multiple micronutrient powders.
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Bookshelf ID: NBK180114

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