Table 11Included communication strategies and approaches for Key Question 3

Type of Communication StrategyIncluded Approaches to Communication
Non-numeric presentations
  • Using words or sentences to describe the presence, degree, or meaning of uncertainty in medical evidence.
Numeric presentations
  • Using numbers to describe the presence, degree, or meaning of uncertainty in medical evidence.
Visual presentations
  • Using graphs, images, or figures to describe the presence, degree, or meaning of uncertainty in medical evidence.
Tailoring presentation:
  • Using messages that are personalized based on an individual’s unique psychological characteristics (e.g., ambiguity aversion, optimism) that might affect their interpretation of evidence.
Targeting presentation
  • Manipulating the presentation of uncertainty to make it more interesting, relevant, or appealing to a specific subgroup of individuals.
Narrative presentation
  • Invoking personal stories, case studies, anecdotes, or testimonials to help individuals understand the presence, degree, or meaning of uncertainty related to medical evidence.
Framed Presentation:
  • Creating messages that present uncertainty in alternate contexts (e.g., relative to other more or less uncertain services).
  • Creating messages that present alternate consequences of uncertainty (e.g., “chances may be as high as” or “chances may be as low as”).
More than one of the above strategies
  • A multicomponent approach uses several communication strategies in concurrent combination or in sequence to increase understanding of the evidence or information.
  • Multicomponent interventions are important to this review only to the extent that they are compared with another intervention that is different by only 1 or more aspects.

From: Methods

Cover of Communication and Dissemination Strategies to Facilitate the Use of Health-Related Evidence
Communication and Dissemination Strategies to Facilitate the Use of Health-Related Evidence.
Evidence Reports/Technology Assessments, No. 213.
McCormack L, Sheridan S, Lewis M, et al.

NCBI Bookshelf. A service of the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.