Table 3Sources of uncertainty mentioned in existing taxonomies of uncertainty

Inadequate Conceptualization of EvidenceaLack of EvidencebBiascInconsistency of Information Across Evidence SourcesdImprecisioneProbabilityfMulticausalitygUncertain Balance of Benefits and HarmshLack of Applicability of EvidenceiOther
Tannert, 200754√ (morals, rules)
Lipschitz, 199742√ (alternatives, roles)
Morgan, 199056√ (linguistic imprecision, interpretation)
Walker, 199157
Smithson, 199059/199358√ (linguistic imprecision)
Babrow, 199837√ (clarity of information, reliability of source, linguistic imprecision)
Djulbegovic, 200738
Politi, 200752
Han, 201136
a

Also called “epistemic uncertainty”

b

Also called “ignorance,” “incomplete evidence,” “ambiguity,” and “vagueness” by various taxonomies

c

Also called “unreliable information,” “systematic error,” “measurement, sampling, or causal uncertainty,” and “information quality” by various taxonomies

d

Also called “conflicting evidence,” “unstable evidence,” “vagueness,” and “ambiguity” by various taxonomies

e

Also called “random error,” “sampling uncertainty,” and “vagueness” by various taxonomies

f

Also called “ontological uncertainty,” “stochastic uncertainty,” “inherent randomness,” “complexity” by various taxonomies

g

Also called “complexity,” “causal uncertainty,” and “modeling uncertainty” in various taxonomies

h

Also called “equivocality” or “equipoise” in various taxonomies

i

Also called “irrelevance,” “generalizability”

From: Introduction

Cover of Communication and Dissemination Strategies to Facilitate the Use of Health-Related Evidence
Communication and Dissemination Strategies to Facilitate the Use of Health-Related Evidence.
Evidence Reports/Technology Assessments, No. 213.
McCormack L, Sheridan S, Lewis M, et al.

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