This figure presents a conceptual model and the analytical framework for the key questions within the context of the Population, Interventions, Comparators, Outcomes, and Settings. The framework includes eight headers: target population for question 1 as children with migraine, pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatments for children with migraine, intermediate outcomes such as number of monthly headache days, and clinical outcomes such as quality of life, prevention of migraine attacks, reduction in frequency of migraine attack by at least 50% from baseline, patient satisfaction, emergency visits, and loss of school days. In general, the figure illustrates pharmacological or combined modalities versus placebo, regular care, or active control may result in intermediate outcomes and clinical outcomes. Adverse events may occur at any point after treatment is received. Treatment effects may be modified by gender, race, aura, prior treatment, comorbidity, family history, and access to care. The figure also gives information about the research questions. Key Question 1: What are is the efficacy and comparative effectiveness of pharmacologic treatments for preventing migraine attacks in children? Key Question 2: What are the comparative harms from pharmacologic treatments for preventing migraine attacks in children? Key Question 3: Which characteristics of children predict the effectiveness and safety of pharmacologic treatments for preventing migraine attacks?

Figure AAnalytical framework

Key Question 1: What are the efficacy and comparative effectiveness of pharmacologic treatments for preventing migraine attacks in children?

Key Question 2: What are the comparative harms from pharmacologic treatments for preventing migraine attacks in children?

Key Question 3: Which characteristics of children predict the effectiveness and safety of pharmacologic treatments for preventing migraine attacks?

From: Executive Summary

Cover of Migraine in Children: Preventive Pharmacologic Treatments
Migraine in Children: Preventive Pharmacologic Treatments [Internet].
Comparative Effectiveness Reviews, No. 108.
Shamliyan TA, Kane RL, Ramakrishnan R, et al.

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