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Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet]. York (UK): Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK); 1995-.

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Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet].

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[Result-related success rates of cataract operations: results of a systematic literature review]

Review published: .

Bibliographic details: Hahn U, Krummenauer F, Neuhann I.  [Result-related success rates of cataract operations: results of a systematic literature review]. [Ergebnisbezogene erfolgsraten der kataraktoperation: ergebnisse einer systematischen literaturubersicht.] Ophthalmologe 2012; 109(6): 575-582. [PubMed: 22534745]

Abstract

This systematic literature review, including 7 publications released since 2000, provides references for outcome indicators of cataract surgery for quality management initiatives. The reported relative numbers of cases achieving visual rehabilitation and refractive accuracy were determined and compared. With one exception the success rates did not represent benchmarks defined as best possible outcome but describe the results of data collected in a population during routine clinical practice. A best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of ≥ 0.5 was achieved in 84-93% of all patients and in 95-99% of patients without preoperative visually impairing comorbidities. A refractive accuracy (absolute deviation of target refraction from spherical equivalent) of ≤ 1 D was reported in 72-97% of the patients. The success rates of these well established outcome indicator levels were high. Differences between operators were more distinguishable and the clinical relevance higher with less liberal indicator levels. A BCVA ≥ 1 was realized in 30-47% of all patients and in 52-62% of patients without visually impairing comorbidities. A total of 45-80% of the patients showed a refractive accuracy of ≤ 0.5 D. Exogenous factors not influencable by the surgeon have a relevant impact on the success rates. The literature review confirms the strong association of visually impairing comorbidities and BCVA outcome. Based on literature methodological problems of quality management systems for cataract surgery are discussed. While voluntary initiatives have the ability to solve these difficulties appropriate concepts for mandatory procedures are currently lacking.

Copyright © 2014 University of York.
Bookshelf ID: NBK117107

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