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Cover of Infection: Prevention and Control of Healthcare-Associated Infections in Primary and Community Care

Infection: Prevention and Control of Healthcare-Associated Infections in Primary and Community Care

Partial Update of NICE Clinical Guideline 2

NICE Clinical Guidelines, No. 139

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Excerpt

Since the publication of the NICE clinical guideline on the prevention of healthcare-associated infections (HCAI) in primary and community care in 2003, many changes have occurred within the NHS that place the patient firmly at the centre of all activities. First, the NHS Constitution for England defines the rights and pledges that every patient can expect regarding their care. To support this, the Care Quality Commission (CQC), the independent regulator of all health and adult social care in England, ensures that health and social care is safe, and monitors how providers comply with established standards. In addition, the legal framework that underpins the guidance has changed since 2003.

New guidance is needed to reflect the fact that, as a result of the rapid turnover of patients in acute care settings, complex care is increasingly being delivered in the community. New standards for the care of patients and the management of devices to prevent related healthcare-associated infections are needed that will also reinforce the principles of asepsis.

This clinical guideline is a partial update of ‘Infection control: prevention of healthcare-associated infection in primary and community care’ (NICE clinical guideline 2; 2003), and addresses areas in which clinical practice for preventing HCAI in primary and community care has changed, where the risk of HCAI is greatest or where the evidence has changed. The Guideline Development Group (GDG) recognise the important contribution that surveillance makes to monitoring infection, but it is not within the scope of this guideline to make specific recommendations about this subject. Where high-quality evidence is lacking, the GDG has highlighted areas for further research.

Contents

Copyright © 2012, National Clinical Guideline Centre.

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The use of registered names, trademarks, etc. in this publication does not imply, even in the absence of a specific statement, that such names are exempt from the relevant laws and regulations and therefore for general use.

The rights of National Clinical Guideline Centre to be identified as Author of this work have been asserted by them in accordance with the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act, 1988.

Bookshelf ID: NBK115271PMID: 23285500

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