TABLE 3-4Percentage of Children (Under Age 18) with Activity Limitations, by Type of Limitation, Age Group, and Gender, 1997 to 2004

Limitation 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004
Limited in activity
       All (ages 0–17) 6.6 6.2 5.9 5.9 6.7 7.0 6.8 7.0
       Male (ages 0–4) 4.2 4.4 3.8 4.0 4.2 4.0 4.2 4.2
       Male (ages 5–17) 9.9 9.3 8.7 8.8 10.3 10.6 10.0 10.5
       Female (ages 0–4) 2.7 2.3 2.4 2.4 2.4 2.5 2.9 2.7
       Female (ages 5–17) 5.5 5.2 5.1 5.0 5.5 6.1 6.0 6.1
Needs help with ADL
       All (ages 5–17) 0.55 0.45 0.50 0.51 0.44 0.66 0.46 0.65
       Male (ages 5–17) 0.64 0.51 0.60 0.64 0.53 0.76 0.52 0.79
       Female (ages 5–17) 0.46 0.38 0.39 0.38 0.34 0.55 0.41 0.50
Has difficulty walking
       All (ages 5–17) 0.25 0.29 0.30 0.29 0.23 0.33 0.23 0.29
       Male (ages 5–17) 0.27 0.27 0.33 0.35 0.27 0.31 0.18 0.34
       Female (ages 5–17) 0.23 0.31 0.26 0.22 0.19 0.34 0.28 0.25
Uses special education
       All (ages 5–17) 6.2 6.1 5.9 5.8 6.7 7.1 6.8 7.1
       Male (ages 5–17) 8.1 7.8 7.5 7.5 8.9 9.2 8.7 9.0
       Female (ages 5–17) 4.1 4.3 4.2 3.9 4.4 5.0 4.9 5.1

NOTE: Only limitations in activity caused by chronic conditions or impairments are included. The respondents are reclassified as having no activity limitation if they report a limitation due to a condition that is not known to be chronic. A child is considered to have an activity limitation if the parent responded positively to at least one of the following questions: (1) “Does [child’s name] receive Special Education Services?” (2) “Because of a physical, mental, or emotional problem, does [child’s name] need the help of other persons with personal care needs, such as eating, bathing, dressing, or getting around inside the home?” (3) “Because of a health problem does [child’s name] have difficulty walking without using any special equipment?” (4) “Is [child’s name] limited in any way because of difficulty remembering or because of periods of confusion?” (5) “Is [child’s name] limited in any activities because of physical, mental, or emotional problems?”

SOURCE: H. Stephen Kaye, Disability Statistics Center, University of California at San Francisco, unpublished tabulations from the National Health Interview Survey, as requested by the committee.

From: 3, Disability Trends

Cover of The Future of Disability in America
The Future of Disability in America.
Institute of Medicine (US) Committee on Disability in America; Field MJ, Jette AM, editors.
Washington (DC): National Academies Press (US); 2007.
Copyright © 2007, National Academy of Sciences.

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