AStudy Activities

Publication Details

In late 2004, at the request of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Institute of Medicine (IOM) began a study to review progress and developments since the publication of the IOM’s 1991 report Disability in America and its 1997 report Enabling America. The study was to identify continuing gaps in disability science and propose steps to strengthen the evidence base for public and private actions to reduce the impact of disability and related conditions on individuals and society in the United States. The assessment of principles and scientific evidence for disability policies and services was to take international perspectives and models into account. (Discussions with CDC clarified that this assessment should focus primarily on international efforts to develop a conceptual framework and classification scheme for disability.)

The study’s statement of task identified several specific topics for consideration, including

  • methodological and policy issues related to the definition, measurement, and monitoring (surveillance) of disability and health over time;
  • trends in the amount, types, and causes of disability;
  • aging with disability and secondary health conditions;
  • transitions from child/adolescent to adult services and community participation;
  • role of assistive technologies and physical environments in increasing participation in society (e.g., through employment, community-based living) of people with disabilities;
  • selected questions related to the financing of health care services, including payment for assistive technologies and risk adjustment of managed care and provider payments; and
  • directions for research.

For administrative reasons, the study began with a limited set of tasks and the charge to conduct an invitational workshop and prepare a workshop summary report that did not include conclusions and recommendations. In planning the workshop, which was held in August 2005, one objective was to develop information that would be useful in the second phase of the project, which would result in a report with conclusions and recommendations. As discussions about the study progressed, CDC enlisted support for the second phase of the study from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (Department of Education) and the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research (National Institutes of Health).

To oversee the workshop phase of the study, the IOM appointed a 10-member committee. The table of contents for the resulting workshop report is included in Appendix B. The IOM added four additional committee members as part of the study’s second phase.

The study committee met five times between August 2005 and September 2006. In addition to the August 2005 workshop, which provided background on the first four topics, the committee conducted two public meetings and commissioned five background papers (which appear as appendixes to the report). The agendas of the workshop and other public meetings are included below. The committee submitted its report for review under procedures of the National Research Council in December 2006, and the report was released in April 2007.

INSTITUTE OF MEDICINE WORKSHOP ON DISABILITY IN AMERICA: AN UPDATE

Keck Center of the National Academies

August 1, 2005

Adjourn

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INSTITUTE OF MEDICINE COMMITTEE ON DISABILITY IN AMERICA: A NEW LOOK

Keck Center of the National Academies

October 5, 2005, Open Session

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INSTITUTE OF MEDICINE COMMITTEE ON DISABILITY IN AMERICA: A NEW LOOK

Keck Center of the National Academies

January 9, 2006

Adjourn

The following organizations provided written statements: AARP Public Policy Institute, American Spinal Injury Association, and American Association on Mental Retardation.