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Results: 17

Steroids for improving recovery following tonsillectomy in children

After children have a tonsillectomy or adenotonsillectomy (surgery to remove the adenoids and/or tonsils), pain, nausea, vomiting and delays to return to eating are common. The corticosteroid drug dexamethasone is sometimes given in a single intravenous dose (through the veins) during surgery to try to prevent vomiting after the operation. We included 19 randomized controlled trials in the review, with a total of 1756 patients. The review of trials found that a dose of corticosteroid during tonsillectomy or adenotonsillectomy can prevent vomiting for one out of every five children who gets the drug. Children also return to a normal diet more quickly and they have less pain after surgery.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Antibiotics or tonsillectomy for people with psoriasis.

Psoriasis, a disease which produces scaly pink patches on the skin, often gets worse after a bacterial throat infection or tonsillitis. When someone with psoriasis has a throat infection, antibiotics are sometimes used in an attempt to prevent this from happening. For people with psoriasis and repeated throat infections tonsillectomy is sometimes recommended. The review found no evidence from trials that either antibiotics or tonsillectomy are helpful for people with psoriasis.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Dissection versus diathermy for tonsillectomy

Tonsillectomy is one of the most common operations. Complications can include bleeding, during or after the operation, and pain. This review compared the effectiveness of two different surgical techniques in reducing these complications. The surgical techniques were diathermy (the use of high‐frequency electrical current to cut tissue, remove the tonsil and control blood loss) and traditional cold dissection (where the tonsil is cut away and blood loss then controlled with ties, stitches or diathermy). Two studies (254 patients) are included in the review. The review of trials found that there is not enough evidence to demonstrate that diathermy is more effective than dissection. There was some evidence that patients who had diathermy tonsillectomy had less bleeding during the operation but more pain afterwards, however more research is needed.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Coblation versus other surgical techniques for tonsillectomy

The coblation technique is not associated with less postoperative pain and bleeding when compared with other surgical methods for tonsillectomy.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Antibiotics to reduce pain and improve recovery following tonsillectomy

Tonsillectomy is a commonly performed operation in children and adults. Following the operation nearly all patients experience significant pain, need regular painkillers and are unable to resume normal diet and activities for several hours. Rarer but more dangerous complications, such as bleeding from the operated area, also occur. Antibiotics are commonly prescribed to reduce some or all of these undesirable consequences of tonsillectomy.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Oral rinses, mouthwashes and sprays for improving outcomes following tonsillectomy

Tonsillectomy is one of the most common operations performed in adults and children. Pain and bleeding following the operation are common. Postoperative tonsillectomy medication should aim to minimise some of these symptoms. A number of mouthwashes and topical sprays are available which offer pain relief or can help to reduce bleeding in the period just after surgery.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Tonsillectomy for PFAPA syndrome (a rare cause of recurrent fever, mouth ulcers, sore throat and swollen neck glands)

This review compared the clinical effectiveness and safety of removing the palatine tonsils (tonsillectomy), with and without removal of the adenoids, against non‐surgical management of children with periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome. We searched for and included any randomised controlled trials published up to October 2013.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Surgical removal of the tonsils (tonsillectomy) for chronic or recurrent acute tonsillitis

This review compared the clinical effectiveness and safety of surgery (removal of the tonsils ‐ tonsillectomy, or adenotonsillectomy ‐ removal of the tonsils and adenoid tissues) against non‐surgical management in adults and children with frequent or chronic tonsillitis.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Fact sheet: Tonsil surgery in children

Most children only have tonsillitis every now and then. Although it is unpleasant, it usually gets better after a few days. But if tonsillitis keeps coming back over several years, the option of surgically removing the tonsils is often considered. This fact sheet describes the advantages and disadvantages of this operation in children who have tonsillitis.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: September 2, 2013

Adenotonsillectomy for obstructive sleep apnoea in children

The current treatment of choice for surgical treatment of obstructive sleep apnoea (reduction of airflow at the nose and mouth during sleep) in children is adenotonsillectomy (the removal of the adenoids and tonsils), due to its perceived efficacy, cost effectiveness and the relative size of adenoid and tonsil tissue in children. There is a lack of strong evidence to support the use of adenotonsillectomy in children with sleep apnoea, although there are some data to indicate that a procedure which removes part of the tonsils (temperature controlled radiofrequency tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy) leads to quicker return to normal diet in the post‐surgery phase than complete tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy. There is some debate as to the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnoea in children and further research would need to undertake extensive diagnostic tests to make an appropriate diagnosis.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Do nonsteroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) increase the risk of bleeding in children having their tonsils out?

The main limitation of our updated review was that bleeding following tonsillectomy is an uncommon event (occurring in 3% to 5% of children). We found all the data from randomized controlled trials that are currently available (15 trials studying approximately 1000 children). Our results were consistent with both an increased and decreased risk of bleeding. There were insufficient data to compare the risk of bleeding with each individual type of NSAID. However, we were able to compare ketorolac, which has been perceived as having a greater risk of bleeding, with the other NSAIDs and found no increased risk of bleeding. There was less nausea and vomiting when NSAIDs were used as part of the pain relief regime than when NSAIDs were not used.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Family‐centred care for hospitalised children aged 0‐12 years ‐ an update

This is an update of the Cochrane systematic review of family‐centred care published in 2007 (Shields 2007). For this update, we have changed the title to show that it is about children aged 0 to 12 years only. We have now excluded premature neonates, and we have changed several other selection criteria: study designs are now limited to randomised controlled trials only; the way in which family‐centredness of interventions is assessed for inclusion has changed; single interventions not reflecting a FCC model of care have been excluded; and the selection criterion whereby studies with less than adequate blinding of outcome assessment were excluded from the review has been removed.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Smart Health Choices: Making Sense of Health Advice

This book aims to help consumers and practitioners develop the skills to assess health advice – and hopefully to make decisions that will improve the quality of their care. For some people, making better-informed decisions could be life saving. We hope that it will be useful if you are struggling to come to terms with an illness or injury, and the best ways of managing it. Or you may simply want to lead a healthier life, and may be wondering how to make sense of the often conflicting flood of health information that deluges us every day, through the media, and from our friends and health practitioners.

Hammersmith Press.

Version: 2008
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Local anaesthetics applied during removal of the tonsils may not reduce pain following the operation

Removal of the tonsils is one of the most common operations and adequate pain control following surgery is an important aspect of patient care. Some surgeons apply local anaesthetics (in addition to the general anaesthetic) to the area around the tonsils before, during, or after the operation in an attempt to improve pain control. The review found that this practice may not reduce pain following the operation. However, the studies included in the review had various shortcomings and further studies will be needed to allow any firm conclusions.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Treatments for guttate psoriasis

Psoriasis is a skin disease that causes scaly pink patches. Guttate psoriasis is a particular form of the disease that usually affects children and young adults. It can happen on its own, or as a complication of ordinary (chronic plaque) psoriasis. Often, it follows a bacterial throat infection or tonsillitis. Antibiotics and tonsillectomy as treatments for guttate psoriasis are covered by another review. This review could find no evidence, from trials, about the effects of any other commonly used treatments for guttate psoriasis.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Non‐immunosuppressive treatment for IgA nephropathy

IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common primary glomerular disease with approximately 30% to 40% of patients progressing to end‐stage kidney disease (ESKD) within 20 years. The most common regimens include immunosuppressive agents, however the risks of long‐term treatment often outweigh the potential benefits. Non‐immunosuppressive options, including fish oils, anticoagulants, antihypertensive agents and tonsillectomy have also been examined but not reviewed systematically.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Corticosteroids as standalone or add‐on treatment for sore throat

Sore throat is a common condition. Patients often receive antibiotics for sore throat, which is thought to contribute to resistance to antibiotics in individuals and the community. Sore throats are painful because of the inflammation of the lining of the throat. Corticosteroids reduce inflammation and because they act on the upper respiratory tract in other conditions, may also be beneficial in sore throat.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Medical Encyclopedia

  • Tonsillectomies and children
    Today, many parents wonder if it is wise for children to have the tonsils taken out. Tonsillectomy may be recommended if your child has any of the following:
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Systematic Reviews in PubMed

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