Home > Search Results
  • We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information

Injection: Treats thiamine deficiency. This medicine is a B vitamin.

By mouth: Thiamine, another name for Vitamin B-1, is used to treat thiamine-deficiency (not enough thiamine in the body).

UsesSide effectsLatest evidence reviewsResearch summaries for consumersBrand names

Results: 4

Thiamine for prevention and treatment of Wernicke‐Korsakoff syndrome in people who abuse alcohol

Wernicke‐Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) is a disorder of the brain caused by a deficiency of vitamin B1 (thiamine). It is characterised by an acute onset of some or all of an eye movement disorder, lack of voluntary coordination of muscle movement (ataxia) and confusion. Patients may die in the acute phase, and many survivors go on to develop permanent memory impairment. Alcohol abuse is an important cause of WKS, although it is not the only consideration. Heavy drinking may lead to particular problems with uptake of thiamine from the diet.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Insufficient evidence of the efficacy of thiamine for people with Alzheimer's disease

Preclinical and laboratory studies show an effect of thiamine on the release and breakdown of acetylcholine. Some intellectual functions, including attention and memory, are influenced by neurons which release acetylcholine. Cholinergic function is impaired in Alzheimer's disease. It has therefore been hypothesized that thiamine may be beneficial in Alzheimer's disease. Biochemical abnormalities in thiamine‐dependent enzymes have been found in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease. The three included randomized controlled trials totaled less than 50 participants and insufficient detail in the results did not allow combination of the data. Thus the review found no evidence of the efficacy of thiamine for people with Alzheimer's disease.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2008

Vitamins for epilepsy

No evidence that folic acid, thiamine, vitamin D or vitamin E improve seizure control or prevent side effects for people with epilepsy.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Vitamin B for treating disorders of the peripheral nerves

Peripheral neuropathy is a disorder of the peripheral nerves resulting from different causes, such as diabetes mellitus and alcoholism, leading to pain, numbness or weakness of the limbs and other problems. Vitamin B is commonly used to treat peripheral neuropathy but it is not clear if it helps. This review of 13 trials on diabetic and alcoholic peripheral neuropathy with a total of 741 participants showed only one study that suggested possible short‐term benefit from eight‐week treatment with benfotiamine (a derivative of vitamin B1) with slightly greater improvement in vibration perception threshold compared to placebo. Vitamin B complex when given in a higher dose administered for four weeks was more efficacious than a lower dose in reducing pain and other clinical problems based on another study. Two to eight weeks of treatment with vitamin B was less efficacious than alpha‐lipoic acid, cilostazol or cytidine triphosphate in short‐term improvement of clinical and nerve test findings. All these findings require confirmation in larger studies before they can be accepted as definite. Vitamin B is generally well‐tolerated with only a few reports of mild side effects.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2008

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

See all (61)...

Recent Activity

    Your browsing activity is empty.

    Activity recording is turned off.

    Turn recording back on

    See more...