Home > Search Results

Results: 3

Acute middle ear infections (acute otitis media): Overview

Acute middle ear infections are one of the most common illnesses in babies and young children. Most children will have had at least one acute middle ear infection by the age of three. They generally clear up on their own within two to three days, and serious complications are rare.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: May 7, 2013

Antibiotics for common respiratory infections with unclear causes and undifferentiated symptoms in children up to five years of age

Undifferentiated acute respiratory infections (ARIs) are large and varied groups of infections that are not clearly restricted to one specific part of the upper respiratory tract. They last for up to seven days. Common respiratory infections have a wide variety of causes, leading to potential complications such as ear, throat and sinus infections. These infections are more common in pre‐school children and are the most frequent reasons for parents to seek medical assistance. Furthermore, they are responsible for 75% of the total prescribed antibiotics in high‐income countries.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Antibiotics for acute middle ear infection (acute otitis media) in children

This review compared 1) the clinical effectiveness and safety of antibiotics against placebo in children with an acute middle ear infection (acute otitis media (AOM)) and 2) the clinical effectiveness and safety of antibiotics against expectant observation (observational approaches in which prescriptions may or may not be provided) in children with AOM.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

See all (33)...

Recent Activity

    Your browsing activity is empty.

    Activity recording is turned off.

    Turn recording back on

    See more...