Home > Search Results

A malignant disease characterized by enlargement of the lymph nodes, spleen, and general lymphoid tissue.

Results: 1 to 20 of 41

Treatment of early stage Hodgkin lymphoma

Hodgkin lymphoma is a malignancy of the lymphatic system, first described by Thomas Hodgkin. It can occur in children and adults, but it is more common in the third decade of life. It is one of the most curable forms of cancer. Clinically speaking, there are four stages of Hodgkin lymphoma. Generally, stages I and II are considered as early stage Hodgkin lymphoma and stages III and IV as advanced stage Hodgkin lymphoma. Using risk factors such as presence or absence of bulky disease, age, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and presence or absence of B symptoms, such as night sweats or fever, early stage Hodgkin lymphoma is further classified into early favourable and early unfavourable stages. Treatment options for Hodgkin lymphoma are chemotherapy, radiotherapy or chemotherapy plus radiotherapy. Nowadays chemotherapy plus radiotherapy to involved areas is considered as standard treatment for patients with early stage Hodgkin lymphoma. Radiotherapy has comparatively more treatment related late side effects than chemotherapy, including second malignancies. Perhaps, patients with early stage Hodgkin lymphoma can benefit more by avoiding radiotherapy and can be treated with chemotherapy alone as effectively as with same chemotherapy plus radiotherapy. With this assumption we assess the role of radiotherapy in the treatment of patients with early stage Hodgkin lymphoma. This systematic review compares chance of dying (overall survival) and chance of tumour control in patients with early stage Hodgkin lymphoma after receiving chemotherapy alone or chemotherapy plus radiotherapy. This review includes 1245 patients from five trials in the main analyses. The result of this review is that the addition of radiotherapy to six cycles of chemotherapy is a better treatment option than six cycles of same chemotherapy alone in patients with early stage Hodgkin lymphoma. In terms of five‐year tumour control, approximately 5 patients would be needed to treat with chemotherapy plus radiotherapy to prevent one additional relapse or progression in five years. For survival, 11 to 55 patients (depending on the risk of death) require treatment with additional radiotherapy to prevent one death in five years. Therefore chemotherapy plus radiotherapy (combined modality treatment) is superior to the identical chemotherapy alone in patients with early stage Hodgkin lymphoma.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Comparison of the two international standards of chemotherapy for patients with early unfavourable or advanced stage Hodgkin lymphoma

Hodgkin lymphoma is a malignancy of the lymphatic system. It is one of the most common cancers in young adults, particularly in their third decade of life, but it occurs also in children and elderly people. Within the last fifty years it has become one of the most curable forms of cancer. To find the best treatment with the greatest efficacy and least toxicity is the most important challenge in treating Hodgkin lymphoma. There are two international standards for the treatment of early unfavourable or advanced stage Hodgkin lymphoma: chemotherapy with escalated BEACOPP (bleomycin/etoposide/doxorubicin/cyclophosphamide/vincristine/procarbazine/prednisone) regimen initiated by the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG) and chemotherapy with ABVD (doxorubicin/ bleomycin/ vinblastine/ dacarbazine) regimen, which is widely used because it has been proven to be effective, well tolerated and easy to administer. We aimed to clarify the advantages and disadvantages of both treatments by comparing the chance of survival (overall survival), the chance of recurrence of the tumour and the frequencies of adverse events after treatment in patients with early unfavourable stage or advanced stage Hodgkin lymphoma.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Idelalisib (Zydelig) for non-Hodgkin lymphoma: Overview

Idelalisib (trade name: Zydelig) has been approved in Germany since September 2014 for the treatment of follicular lymphoma or chronic lymphatic leukemia.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: January 2, 2015

High‐dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplantation in the first line treatment of aggressive Non‐Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) in adults

Aggressive Non‐Hodgkin's Lymphomas (NHLs) are fast growing forms of lymphoma. The most common type is a diffuse large B‐Cell lymphoma (DLCL) but there are several other subtypes of aggressive lymphoma and variants of DLCL, such as centroblastic, immunoblastic or anaplastic large B‐Cell lymphoma. Aggressive NHLs are generally responsive to conventional cancer therapies such as chemotherapy and radiation therapy. In the 1980s, many researchers reported that some patients with diffuse, large‐cell lymphoma, who had not responded to conventional chemotherapy, could be cured with high‐dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell or bone marrow transplantation. This techniques may be used to treat the cancer, because the high doses of chemotherapy can destroy the patient's bone marrow. Therefore stem cells or marrow is taken from the patient before treatment. The marrow or the stem cells are then frozen, and the patient is given high‐dose chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy to treat the cancer. The marrow or the stem cells that were taken out is then thawed and given back through a needle in a vein to replace the marrow that was destroyed. This type of transplant is called an autologous transplant. If the marrow given is taken from another person, the transplant is called an allogeneic transplant.On the first decade of study into autologous transplantation for the treatment of aggressive lymphoma, the focus was on the use of this approach to rescue patients after relapse or if the disease already progressed under standard chemotherapy. These encouraging results in relapsed or progressive lymphoma led to the testing of the technique as a primary therapy for the disease. However, it was also important to identify factors that could predict outcome of the therapy for patients with aggressive lymphoma. The International Prognostic Index score (IPI) was established in 1993. This score was designed to better predict outcome of aggressive lymphoma. Based on the number of negative prognostic factors present at the time of diagnosis (age >60 years, stage III/IV disease, elevated lactate dehydrogenase [LDH] level, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group [ECOG] performance status > 2, more than one extranodal site of disease) four outcome groups (low‐risk, low‐intermediate risk, high‐intermediate risk and high‐risk ) were identified with a 5‐year overall survival ranging from 26% to 73%.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Interventions for previously untreated AIDS‐associated Hodgkin´s lymphoma in adults

There is a lack of evidence from randomised controlled trials for the efficacy and safety of different interventions for treating AIDS‐associated Hodgkin's disease, regarding both overall survival and disease‐free survival in treatment‐naive adults with AIDS. Lymphoma is a cancer of the lymphatic system. Lymphomas are classified into two general types: Hodgkin's disease and non‐Hodgkin's lymphomas. Hodgkin's disease is the most common non‐AIDS‐defining malignancy in HIV‐infected patients. Randomised controlled trials for the efficacy and safety of different interventions for treating AIDS‐associated Hodgkin's disease on overall survival and disease‐free survival in treatment‐naive adults with AIDS could not be found.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

High‐dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation for patients with relapsed/refractory Hodgkin lymphoma

Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a malignancy of single lymph nodes, the lymphatic system, and might affect other additional organs. It is a relatively rare disease, accounting for two or three people per 100,000 every year in Western countries, but it is one of the most common cancers in young adults between 20 and 30 years of age. The second peak of the disease is after the age of 60 years. Treatment options for HL have improved since the 1980s, so that even patients in advanced stages may be cured with adequate therapy. Treatment approaches include chemotherapy, radiotherapy or chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy (combined‐modality treatment), of which the combined‐modality treatment is standard for most patients nowadays. Nevertheless, 15% to 20% of patients do not reach complete remission and have refractory disease or relapse. For these patients high‐dose chemotherapy (HDCT) followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) has become the optimal treatment option. However, the impact of this regimen on overall survival is still unclear. Therefore, we conducted a Cochrane Review on efficacy and safety of HDCT followed by ASCT in patients with primary refractory or relapsed HL. We searched several important medical databases (the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and MEDLINE) and summarised and analysed evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCTs). We identified three RCTs corresponding to our pre‐defined inclusion criteria treating 398 patients. We included two trials that compared HDCT followed by ASCT versus conventional chemotherapy alone, and one trial evaluating additional sequential HDCT (SHDCT) followed by ASCT against HDCT followed by ASCT.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Imaging‐adapted therapy for individuals with Hodgkin lymphoma

Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a malignant disease of the lymphatic system of the body. It accounts for 10% to 15% of all lymphoma in industrialised countries and tends to show two peaks in incidence at around 30 and 60 years of age. While it is considered a relatively rare disease, it is one of the most common malignancies in young adults. With cure rates of up to 90% over 5 years, it is one of the most curable cancers worldwide.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Patient Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about the treatment of adult Hodgkin lymphoma.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: October 27, 2015

Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Patient Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about the treatment of childhood Hodgkin lymphoma.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: December 16, 2015

Interventions for untreated patients with AIDS‐associated non‐Hodgkin's lymphoma

Lymphoma is a cancer of the lymphatic system. There are two general types: Hodgkin's disease (HD) and non‐Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Non‐Hodgkin's lymphoma is the most common AIDS‐defining malignancy in HIV‐infected patients. The most frequent clinical presentations of NHL during AIDS are systemic illness with the compromise of the primary central nervous system and with primary effusion. In people with HIV infection, most lymphomas have originated in an aggressive B‐cell precursor and have a high‐to‐intermediate histology grade. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of different interventions for treating AIDS‐associated NHL found unclear evidence for efficacy and safety.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Interferon‐alpha in the maintenance therapy of follicular non‐Hodgkin's lymphoma

The aim of this systematic review is to outline the possible benefits (i.e. prolonging survival) and also the disadvantages (adverse events) of therapy with interferon‐alpha, administered alone or in combination with other proven drug regimens (otherwise known as chemotherapy) to patients affected by follicular non‐Hodgkin's lymphoma. Interferons are proteins secreted by vertebrate cells that exhibit various biological actions. They confer resistance against many different viruses, inhibit proliferation of normal and malignant cells, augment natural killer cell activity, and show several other immunomodulatory functions. Interferons, types alfa‐2a or alfa‐2b, are usually administered in combination with other drugs to treat a variety of infective and neoplastic diseases. The results showed a significant benefit in progression‐free survival in patients treated with interferon‐alpha alone or combined with chemotherapy as compared with comparator therapies. There was, however, less evidence that interferon‐alpha supported any benefit on overall survival. Furthermore, the presence of relevant drug‐related adverse events suggested that a careful analysis of the risks and benefits has to be performed when making a specific clinical decision about this therapy.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

Hot Flashes and Night Sweats (PDQ®): Patient Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about causes and treatment of hot flashes and night sweats in cancer patients.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: October 15, 2014

Second malignancy risk in Hodgkin's disease patients depends upon the choice of chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy as first‐line treatment.

Hodgkin's disease (HD) patients are usually treated initially with radiotherapy alone (RT; early stages only), chemotherapy alone (CT) or combined chemo‐radiotherapy (CRT). A meta‐analysis of data from 37 randomised trials including over 9000 patients was conducted. For early‐stage patients, CRT resulted in longer survival and longer HD‐free survival than either RT or CT alone. Second malignancy (SM) risk was lower with CRT than with RT (no difference in between CRT and CT was demonstrated). For advanced stages, no difference in survival between CRT and CT was established. With CRT, HD‐free survival was longer but SM risk was higher.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2008

Nausea and Vomiting (PDQ®): Patient Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about nausea and vomiting as complications of cancer or its treatment. Approaches to the management of nausea and vomiting are discussed.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: September 2, 2015

Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Patient Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about the treatment of childhood non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: April 7, 2016

Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Patient Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about the treatment of adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: July 22, 2016

Cancer-Related Post-traumatic Stress (PDQ®): Patient Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about post-traumatic stress and related symptoms in cancer patients, cancer survivors, and their family members. Assessment and treatment of these symptoms are discussed.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: July 7, 2015

The role of chemotherapy additional to high‐dose methotrexate for treatment of patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma

Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is a malignant disease of the lymphatic system that accounts for about 2% to 5% of all primary intracranial tumours in immunocompetent patients. It is a form of extranodal non‐Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and appears at a median age of 62 years. PCNSL is a rare disease with an incidence of 2.7 cases per million population per year, but since the 1990s the occurrence of it has increased in immunocompetent as well as immunocompromised (mostly human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)‐infection related) populations. Symptoms of PCNSL can present manifold though the usual signs are neurological deficits, neuropsychiatric symptoms and raised intracranial pressure. Despite improved treatment strategies, overall survival is still poor and a standard of care for PCNSL patients has not been defined yet. However, high‐dose methotrexate (HD‐MTX) with additional chemotherapy is considered to increase overall survival although the value of additional chemotherapy remains unclear, as there is evidence of a higher risk of adverse events. In this systematic review we summarised and analysed the evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) on efficacy and safety of methotrexate combined with additional chemotherapy in the treatment of adult, immunocompetent PCNSL patients regarding overall survival, progression‐free survival, response rate, adverse events, treatment‐related mortality and quality of life. We searched several important medical databases such as CENTRAL and MEDLINE and found one RCT with 79 patients that fulfilled our inclusion criteria. As a result, this review shows that patients treated with methotrexate plus cytarabine compared to high‐dose methotrexate alone have a statistically significant improvement in progression‐free survival and response rate. No statistically significant difference is shown for overall survival. Adverse events, especially infections, hepatotoxicity and haematological toxicities are more common in patients undergoing therapy with methotrexate plus cytarabine, although there are no differences in terms of treatment‐related mortality. Owing to the small number of included trials and patients, the findings in this review remain uncertain and more RCTs with enlarged numbers of patients and longer follow‐up periods are needed. However, the one analysed study demonstrated that RCTs are feasible on patients with this rare disease and should concentrate on overall survival.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Grief, Bereavement, and Coping With Loss (PDQ®): Patient Version

Expert-reviewed report about grief, bereavement, and feelings of loss in survivors of someone who has died of cancer. Grief in children is also discussed.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: March 6, 2013

Fatigue (PDQ®): Patient Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about fatigue, a condition marked by extreme tiredness and inability to function because of lack of energy, often seen as a complication of cancer or its treatment.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: May 7, 2015

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

See all (700)...

Systematic Review Methods in PubMed

See all (7)...

Recent Activity

    Your browsing activity is empty.

    Activity recording is turned off.

    Turn recording back on

    See more...