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Comparisons of therapeutic efficacy and safety of solifenacin versus tolterodine in patients with overactive bladder: a meta-analysis of outcomes

OBJECTIVE: To compare the clinical efficacy and safety of solifenacin versus tolterodine in patients with overactive bladder (OAB).

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

[Safety of solifenacin and tolterodine in the treatment of overactive bladder: a meta-analysis]

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the safety of solifenacin and tolterodine in the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB).

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

Tolterodine extended release in the treatment of male oab/storage luts: a systematic review

BACKGROUND: Overactive bladder (OAB)/ storage lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) have a high prevalence affecting up to 90% of men over 80 years. The role of sufficient therapies appears crucial. In the present review, we analyzed the mechanism of action of tolterodine extended-release (ER) with the aim to clarify its efficacy and safety profile, as compared to other active treatments of OAB/storage LUTS.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Treatment of Overactive Bladder in Women

The Vanderbilt Evidence-based Practice Center systematically reviewed evidence on treatment of overactive bladder (OAB), urge urinary incontinence, and related symptoms. We focused on prevalence and incidence, treatment outcomes, comparisons of treatments, modifiers of outcomes, and costs.

Evidence Reports/Technology Assessments - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: August 2009
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Drug Class Review: Agents for Overactive Bladder: Final Report Update 4 [Internet]

Overactive bladder is defined by the International Continence Society as a syndrome of urinary frequency and urgency, with or without urge incontinence, appearing in the absence of local pathological factors. Treatment of overactive bladder syndrome first requires a clear diagnosis. In patients with incontinence, multiple forms can be present and it is important to determine which form is dominant. Non-pharmacologic, non-surgical treatment consists of behavioral training (prompted voiding, bladder training, pelvic muscle rehabilitation), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, catheterization, and use of absorbent pads. Pharmacologic treatment for overactive bladder syndrome includes darifenacin, flavoxate hydrochloride, hyoscyamine, oxybutynin chloride, tolterodine tartrate, trospium chloride, scopolamine transdermal, and solifenacin succinate. The purpose of this systematic review is to compare the benefits and harms of drugs used to treat overactive bladder syndrome.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: March 2009
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Nonsurgical Treatments for Urinary Incontinence in Adult Women: Diagnosis and Comparative Effectiveness [Internet]

Our objectives were to assess methods to diagnose urinary incontinence (UI) and monitor treatment effectiveness in community-dwelling adult women, and to assess clinical efficacy and comparative effectiveness of pharmacological and nonsurgical treatments for UI.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: April 2012
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Which anticholinergic drug for overactive bladder symptoms in adults

Many adults have symptoms of overactive bladder. A person with overactive bladder syndrome feels a very strong urge to pass urine and they may not make it to the toilet before they leak urine. Other common problems are a feeling of needing to urinate often during the day or night, or both. This problem seems to be caused by an overactive bladder muscle, and it becomes more common with ageing. Treatments are conservative measures, such as bladder training or drugs. Anticholinergic drugs can reduce the overactivity of the bladder muscle and the feeling of urgency. The review found that there are several anticholinergic drugs prescribed for adults with overactive bladder symptoms. The two most studied drugs are oxybutynin and tolterodine. These two drugs have similar effects but, on average, those taking oxybutynin were more likely to withdraw from the studies because of adverse effects, mainly dry mouth. However, both drugs can give dry mouth and this problem is less likely if an extended release formulation of either drug is used. Two newer drugs are solifenacin and fesoterodine. Solifenacin has a better effect and less risk of dry mouth compared to tolterodine. Fesoterodine has a better effect than extended release tolterodine but withdrawal from studies due to adverse effects and dry mouth was more likely.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Urinary Incontinence in Women: The Management of Urinary Incontinence in Women

This guidance is a partial update of National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) clinical guideline 40 (published October 2006) and will replace it.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: September 2013

Anticholinergic drugs in patients with overactive bladder syndrome.

An overactive bladder is a condition in which bladder contracts suddenly without any control, resulting in feeling to urinate and or leakage of urine. This is a common condition in adults and is also called as 'irritable' bladder or detrusor instability, urge or urgency‐frequency syndrome. Overactive bladder becomes more common with advancing age. Anticholinergic drugs mainly by their muscle relaxant action can help adults with symptoms of urinary frequency, urgency and urge incontinence.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Nocturnal Enuresis: The Management of Bedwetting in Children and Young People

This guideline aims to provide advice on the assessment and management of children and young people with bedwetting. The guidance is applicable to children and young people up to 19 years with the symptom of bedwetting. It has been common practice to define enuresis as abnormal from 5 years and only to consider children for treatment when they are 7 years. While the prevalence of symptoms decreases with age the guideline scope did not specify a younger age limit in order to consider whether there were useful interventions that might be of benefit to children previously excluded from advice and services.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: 2010
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Urinary Incontinence in Neurological Disease: Management of Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction in Neurological Disease

The guideline covers adults and children (from birth) with lower urinary tract dysfunction resulting from neurological disease or injury.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: August 2012
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The Management of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms in Men [Internet]

The guideline covers men (18 and over) with a clinical working diagnosis of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Options for conservative, pharmacological, surgical, and complementary or alternative treatments are considered in terms of clinical and cost effectiveness.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: 2010
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Parkinson's Disease: National Clinical Guideline for Diagnosis and Management in Primary and Secondary Care

It is almost 200 years since James Parkinson described the major symptoms of the disease that came to bear his name. Slowly but surely our understanding of the disease has improved and effective treatment has been developed, but Parkinson’s disease remains a huge challenge to those who suffer from it and to those involved in its management. In addition to the difficulties common to other disabling neurological conditions, the management of Parkinson’s disease must take into account the fact that the mainstay of pharmacological treatment, levodopa, can eventually produce dyskinesia and motor fluctuation. Furthermore, there are a number of agents besides levodopa that can help parkinsonian symptoms, and there is the enticing but unconfirmed prospect that other treatments might protect against worsening neurological disability. Thus, a considerable degree of judgement is required in tailoring individual therapy and in timing treatment initiation. It is hoped that this guideline on Parkinson’s disease will be of considerable help to those involved at all levels in these difficult management decisions. The guideline has been produced using standard NICE methodology and is therefore based on a thorough search for best evidence.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Chronic Conditions (UK).

Version: 2006
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Solifenacin for overactive bladder: a systematic review and meta-analysis

This study aims to evaluate the efficacy and safety of solifenacin for treating overactive bladder. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were identified and extracted from MEDLINE, Embase, and CENTRAL. The quality of the included RCTs was assessed using the Jadad score, and heterogeneity was analyzed using the chi-squared test. The data of the included RCTs were collected, extracted, and assessed by our protocol. A total of nine RCTs were identified from the search strategy. Compared with the placebo and tolterodine treatments, both short-term (mostly 12-week) trials indicated that solifenacin significantly reduced urgency episodes, micturitions, and incontinence episodes per 24 h. Compared with the solifenacin (5 mg) group, the solifenacin (10 mg) group was significantly better in terms of the number of micturitions per 24 h. With regard to adverse effects, the patients treated with solifenacin had significantly higher rates of constipation and blurred vision than patients treated with tolterodine. The solifenacin therapy was not inferior to tolterodine in terms of efficacy profiles and had a similar incidence of overall adverse events compared with tolterodine treatment. Solifenacin (5 mg) is thus a recommended dose because of its reported balance between efficacy and acceptable tolerability.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

The role of mirabegron in overactive bladder: a systematic review and meta-analysis

OBJECTIVE: To present a systematic review assessing the efficacy and safety of mirabegron for overactive bladder (OAB).

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Mirabegron: a beta-3 agonist for overactive bladder

OBJECTIVE: To review the literature regarding the efficacy and safety of mirabegron for the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB).

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Effects of percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation on adult patients with overactive bladder syndrome: a systematic review

AIMS: To assess the effectiveness of percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) on adult patients with overactive bladder syndrome, using a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs), clinical controlled trials (CCTs), and prospective observational cohort studies.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Male urinary incontinence: prevalence, risk factors, and preventive interventions

Urinary incontinence (UI) in community-dwelling men affects quality of life and increases the risk of institutionalization. Observational studies and randomized, controlled trials published in English from 1990 to November 2007 on the epidemiology and prevention of UI were identified in several databases to abstract rates and adjusted odds ratios (OR) of incontinence, calculate absolute risk difference (ARD) after clinical interventions, and synthesize evidence with random-effects models. Of 1083 articles identified, 126 were eligible for analysis. Pooled prevalence of UI increased with age to 21% to 32% in elderly men. Poor general health, comorbidities, severe physical limitations, cognitive impairment, stroke (pooled OR 1.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.14-2.1), urinary tract infections (pooled OR 3.49; 95% CI, 2.33-5.23), prostate diseases, and diabetes (pooled OR 1.36; 95% CI, 1.14-1.61) were associated with UI. Treatment with tolterodine alone (ARD 0.17; 95% CI, 0.02-0.32) or combined with tamsulosin (ARD 0.17; 95% CI, 0.08-0.25) resulted in greater self-reported benefit compared with placebo. Radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy for prostate cancer compared with watchful waiting increased UI. Short-term prevention of UI with pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation after prostatectomy was not consistently seen across randomized, controlled trials. The prevalence of incontinence increased with age and functional dependency. Stroke, diabetes, poor general health, radiation, and surgery for prostate cancer were associated with UI in community-dwelling men. Men reported overall benefit from drug treatments. Limited evidence of preventive effects of pelvic floor rehabilitation requires future investigation.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2009

Comparative efficacy and safety of medical treatments for the management of overactive bladder: a systematic literature review and mixed treatment comparison

CONTEXT: Overactive bladder (OAB) treatment guidelines recommend antimuscarinics as first-line pharmacologic therapy. Mirabegron is a first-in-class β3-adrenoceptor agonist licensed for the treatment of OAB and has shown to be well tolerated and effective in the treatment of OAB symptoms.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials with antimuscarinic drugs for overactive bladder

This review concluded that extended release anticholinergic formulations were preferred to immediate release. Dose escalation may improve the efficacy of immediate release formulations, but lead to increased adverse events. More studies were needed to determine appropriate drug therapy for first-, second- and third-line treatments. This review had some important methodological limitations and the authors conclusions may not be reliable.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2008

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