Home > Search Results

Results: 7

Azithromycin versus penicillin G benzathine for early syphilis

Syphilis is a complex disease that can involve virtually any organ in the body. The World Health Organization estimates that at least 12 million people are infected with syphilis worldwide. Some early research suggested that azithromycin was superior to benzathine penicillin G in the treatment of early syphilis, and that azithromycin can overcome the disadvantages of penicillin G benzathine. This review of three trials failed to identify a difference between azithromycin and benzathine penicillin G for early syphilis in the odds of cure rate, with the result being too imprecise to confidently rule out the superiority of either treatment option. Although gastrointestinal adverse effects were more common in the participants on azithromycin, than in those given benzathine penicillin G, the difference with benzathine penicillin did not reach statistical significance. More research is required in this area.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Genital ulcer disease treatment for reducing sexual acquisition of HIV

The presence of a genital ulcer would provide an entry point for the HIV virus if an HIV‐negative individual with an ulcer has unprotected sexual intercourse with an HIV‐infected person. Treatment of the condition causing the genital ulcer would allow the ulcer to heal and therefore reduce the chances of HIV acquisition. This review assessed whether giving treatment for diseases that present with ulcers in the genital region would reduce sexual acquisition of HIV. Three studies were identified involving 173 HIV‐negative patients with genital ulcers. These studies did not provide sufficient evidence that treatment of genital ulcer diseases reduces sexual acquisition of HIV infection. However, genital ulcer diseases are public health problems in their own right and patients with these conditions should be treated appropriately; whether the treatment reduces the risk of HIV infection or not.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Safety of benzathine penicillin for preventing congenital syphilis: a systematic review

OBJECTIVE: To estimate the risk of serious adverse reactions to benzathine penicillin in pregnant women for preventing congenital syphilis.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Lives Saved Tool supplement detection and treatment of syphilis in pregnancy to reduce syphilis related stillbirths and neonatal mortality

BACKGROUND: Globally syphilis is an important yet preventable cause of stillbirth, neonatal mortality and morbidity.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

Fractures (Complex): Assessment and Management

Two of the five guidelines in the NICE Trauma Suite relate to fractures. These are titled non-complex and complex fractures. In broad terms the non-complex fractures are those likely to be treated at the receiving hospital, whereas the complex fractures require transfer or the consideration of transfer of the injured person to a specialist centre.

NICE Guideline - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: February 2016
Show search results within this document

Bacterial Meningitis and Meningococcal Septicaemia: Management of Bacterial Meningitis and Meningococcal Septicaemia in Children and Young People Younger than 16 Years in Primary and Secondary Care

This guideline covers bacterial meningitis and meningococcal septicaemia, focusing on management of these conditions in children and young people aged younger than 16 years in primary and secondary care, and using evidence of direct relevance to these age groups where available.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: 2010
Show search results within this document

Antibiotics for Early-Onset Neonatal Infection: Antibiotics for the Prevention and Treatment of Early-Onset Neonatal Infection

Early-onset neonatal bacterial infection (infection with onset within 72 hours of birth) is a significant cause of mortality and morbidity in newborn babies. Parent organisations and the scientific literature report that there can be unnecessary delays in recognising and treating sick babies. In addition, concern about the possibility of early-onset neonatal infection is common. This concern is an important influence on the care given to pregnant women and newborn babies. There is wide variation in how the risk of early-onset neonatal infection is managed in healthy babies. The approach taken by the NHS needs to: prioritise the treatment of sick babies, minimise the impact of management pathways on healthy women and babies, use antibiotics wisely to avoid the development of resistance to antibiotics. These drivers have not always been addressed consistently in the NHS, and this guideline was commissioned to ensure they would be addressed in future.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: August 2012
Show search results within this document

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

See all (14)...

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...