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Eating Disorders: Core Interventions in the Treatment and Management of Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa and Related Eating Disorders

This guideline has been developed to advise on the identification, treatment and management of the eating disorders anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and related conditions. The guideline recommendations have been developed by a multidisciplinary group of health care professionals, patients and their representatives, and guideline methodologists after careful consideration of the best available evidence. It is intended that the guideline will be useful to clinicians and service commissioners in providing and planning high quality care for those with eating disorders while also emphasising the importance of the experience of care for patients and carers.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (UK).

Version: 2004

Obesity: Identification, Assessment and Management of Overweight and Obesity in Children, Young People and Adults: Partial Update of CG43

NICE issued guidance on the prevention, identification, assessment and management of overweight and obesity in adults and children in 2006 (CG43). This was a joint clinical and public health guideline developed by the National Collaborating Centre for Primary Care (now merged as part of the National Clinical Guidelines Centre) and NICE’s Centre for Public Health Excellence. Despite the guidance, there remain significant variations in existing service provision for people with obesity and, in many places, the multicomponent programmes that are required for both prevention and treatment are limited. The 2013 Royal College of Physicians report ‘Action on obesity: comprehensive care for all’ reported that access to surgery for obesity in some areas of the UK did not reflect the guideline recommendations.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: November 2014

Evaluation of Biomarkers and Surrogate Endpoints in Chronic Disease

Many people naturally assume that the claims made for foods and nutritional supplements have the same degree of scientific grounding as those for medication, but that is not always the case. The IOM recommends that the FDA adopt a consistent scientific framework for biomarker evaluation in order to achieve a rigorous and transparent process.

National Academies Press (US).

Version: 2010
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Nutrition in Cancer Care (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about the causes and management of nutritional problems that occur in patients with cancer.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: January 8, 2016

Systematic reviews of and integrated report on the quantitative, qualitative and economic evidence base for the management of obesity in men

Study found that sex- and gender-related differences in relation to the content of weight-loss interventions should be recognised and efforts should be made to include accessible, male-friendly intervention settings and that health service staff should initiate discussion regarding weight-loss services.

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: May 2014
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The Guide to Clinical Preventive Services 2014: Recommendations of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

Since its inception, the USPSTF has made and maintained recommendations on dozens of clinical preventive services that are intended to prevent or reduce the risk for heart disease, cancer, infectious diseases, and other conditions and events that impact the health of children, adolescents, adults, and pregnant women. The Guide to Clinical Preventive Services 2014 includes both new and updated recommendations released from 2004–2014 in a brief, easily usable format meant for use at the point of patient care. The most up-to-date version of the recommendations, as well as the complete USPSTF recommendation statements, are available along with their supporting scientific evidence at www.USPreventiveServicesTaskForce.org.

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: May 2014

The Prevention and Management of Pressure Ulcers in Primary and Secondary Care

Prevention of pressure ulcers usually involves an assessment to identify people most at risk of pressure ulcers, such as elderly, immobile people or those with spinal cord injury. Assessments are most commonly carried out using specific pressure area risk scores (for example, the Braden or Waterlow scales for predicting pressure sore risk or the, Glamorgan scale for paediatric pressure ulcers).

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: April 2014
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Multiple Pregnancy: The Management of Twin and Triplet Pregnancies in the Antenatal Period

This guideline contains recommendations specific to twin and triplet pregnancies and covers the following clinical areas: optimal methods to determine gestational age and chorionicity; maternal and fetal screening programmes to identify structural abnormalities, chromosomal abnormalities and feto-fetal transfusion syndrome (FFTS), and to detect intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR); the effectiveness of interventions to prevent spontaneous preterm birth; and routine (elective) antenatal corticosteroid prophylaxis for reducing perinatal morbidity. The guideline also advises how to give accurate, relevant and useful information to women with twin and triplet pregnancies and their families, and how best to support them.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: September 2011

Hypertension in Pregnancy: The Management of Hypertensive Disorders During Pregnancy

This clinical guideline concerns the management of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy and their complications from preconception to the postnatal period. For the purpose of this guideline, ‘pregnancy’ includes the antenatal, intrapartum and postpartum (6 weeks after birth) periods. The guideline has been developed with the aim of providing guidance in the following areas: information and advice for women who have chronic hypertension and are pregnant or planning to become pregnant; information and advice for women who are pregnant and at increased risk of developing hypertensive disorders of pregnancy; management of pregnancy with chronic hypertension; management of pregnancy in women with gestational hypertension; management of pregnancy for women with pre-eclampsia before admission to critical care level 2 setting; management of pre-eclampsia and its complications in a critical care setting; information, advice and support for women and healthcare professionals after discharge to primary care following a pregnancy complicated by hypertension; care of the fetus during pregnancy complicated by a hypertensive disorder.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: August 2010

The Effectiveness of Interventions to Treat Severe Acute Malnutrition in Young Children: A Systematic Review

Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) arises as a consequence of a sudden period of food shortage and is associated with loss of a person's body fat and wasting of their skeletal muscle. Many of those affected are already undernourished and are often susceptible to disease. Infants and young children are the most vulnerable as they require extra nutrition for growth and development, have comparatively limited energy reserves and depend on others. Undernutrition can have drastic and wide-ranging consequences for the child's development and survival in the short and long term. Despite efforts made to treat SAM through different interventions and programmes, it continues to cause unacceptably high levels of mortality and morbidity. Uncertainty remains as to the most effective methods to treat severe acute malnutrition in young children.

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: April 2012
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Diabetes in Pregnancy: Management of Diabetes and Its Complications from Preconception to the Postnatal Period

Clinical guidelines have been defined as ‘systematically developed statements which assist clinicians and patients in making decisions about appropriate treatment for specific conditions’. This clinical guideline concerns the management of diabetes and its complications from preconception to the postnatal period. It has been developed with the aim of providing guidance on:

NICE Guideline - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: February 2015

Urinary Incontinence in Women: The Management of Urinary Incontinence in Women

This guidance is a partial update of National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) clinical guideline 40 (published October 2006) and will replace it.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: September 2013

Intravenous Fluid Therapy: Intravenous Fluid Therapy in Adults in Hospital [Internet]

Many adult hospital inpatients need intravenous (IV) fluid therapy to prevent or correct problems with their fluid and/or electrolyte status. This may be because they cannot meet their normal needs through oral or enteral routes (for example, they have swallowing problems or gastrointestinal dysfunction) or because they have unusual fluid and/or electrolyte deficits or demands caused by illness or injury (for example, high gastrointestinal or renal losses). Deciding on the optimal amount and composition of IV fluids to be administered and the best rate at which to give them can be a difficult task, and decisions must be based on careful assessment of the patient’s individual needs.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: December 2013

Clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of elemental nutrition for the maintenance of remission in Crohn’s disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis

This systematic review aimed to assess the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of elemental nutrition for maintenance of remission in patients with Crohn’s Disease (CD). No cost-effectiveness evidence was found. Limited evidence indicates potential benefits of elemental nutrition against no intervention in the maintenance of remission and prevention of relapse in adult patients with CD. There was a lack or insufficient evidence on adverse events and complications. The findings warrant cautious interpretation given the limitations of the evidence and the risk of bias in individual studies. Future large and long-term randomised trials are warranted to draw more definitive conclusions.

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: March 2015

Lactose Intolerance and Health

We systematically reviewed evidence to determine lactose intolerance (LI) prevalence, bone health after dairy-exclusion diets, tolerable dose of lactose in subjects with diagnosed LI, and management.

Evidence Reports/Technology Assessments - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: February 2010
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Nutritional Supplements for Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Systematic Review [Internet]

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of irreversible vision loss in the developed world. In 2004, AMD affected 1.75 million persons in the United States, a number that is expected to rise to nearly 3 million by 2020 due to the aging of the population.

Evidence-based Synthesis Program - Department of Veterans Affairs (US).

Version: January 2012

Menopause: Full Guideline

In summary, a large number of women in the UK experience menopausal symptoms which, in many cases, can significantly affect their quality of life. It is probable that a minority of these women seek medical treatment and for those who do there is considerable variation in the help available, with many being told that the symptoms will get better with time. Since symptoms may often continue for 7 years or more, this advice is inappropriate and help should be offered where possible. Women need to know about the available options and their risks and benefits, and be empowered to become part of the decision-making process.

NICE Guideline - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: November 12, 2015
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Neonatal Jaundice

Jaundice is one of the most common conditions requiring medical attention in newborn babies. Approximately 60% of term and 80% of preterm babies develop jaundice in the first week of life, and about 10% of breastfed babies are still jaundiced at 1 month of age. In most babies with jaundice thevre is no underlying disease, and this early jaundice (termed ‘physiological jaundice’) is generally harmless. However, there are pathological causes of jaundice in the newborn, which, although rare, need to be detected. Such pathological jaundice may co-exist with physiological jaundice.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: May 2010

Irritable Bowel Syndrome in Adults: Diagnosis and Management of Irritable Bowel Syndrome in Primary Care [Internet]

This guideline covers areas relevant to the diagnosis and management of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) reflecting the complete patient journey, from the person presenting with IBS symptoms, positive diagnosis and management, targeted at symptom control. The guideline incorporates Cochrane reviews, published NICE clinical and public health guidance, Health Technology Assessment reports, systematic and health economic reviews produced by the National Collaborating Centre for Nursing and Supportive Care. Recommendations are based on clinical and cost effectiveness evidence, and where this is insufficient, the GDG used all available information sources and experience to make consensus recommendations using nominal group technique.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Nursing and Supportive Care (UK).

Version: February 2008

Long-acting Reversible Contraception: The Effective and Appropriate Use of Long-Acting Reversible Contraception

Contraception can be divided into two broad categories: hormonal and nonhormonal. There are two categories of hormonal contraception: combined oestrogen and progestogen and progestogen-only. Long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) is defined in this guideline as methods that require administering less than once per cycle or month.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women’s and Children’s Health (UK).

Version: October 2005

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