Home > Search Results

Treats the symptoms of schizophrenia.

UsesSide effectsLatest evidence reviewsResearch summaries for consumersBrand names

Results: 1 to 20 of 38

No evidence to support the use of thioridazine for dementia

Behavioural problems are common in dementia and are a significant source of caregiver burden. Thioridazine has significant sedative effect, and it is thought that this is the main mechanism of action in calming and controlling the patient. However, pharmacologically, it also has marked anticholinergic properties that could potentially have a detrimental effect on cognitive function. The only positive effect of thioridazine when compared with placebo is to reduce anxiety. When compared with placebo, other neuroleptics, and other sedatives it has equal or higher rates of adverse effects. Thioridazine has minimal or no effect on global ratings, while other drugs such as chlormethiazole are superior to it on behavioural ratings. Clinicians should be aware that there is no evidence to support the use of thioridazine in dementia, and its use may expose patients to excess side effects.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Thioridazine for schizophrenia

About 1% of people will get schizophrenia and it often begins early in life. Schizophrenia is typically characterised by hallucinations (perceptions without a cause), delusions (fixed and false beliefs), disordered thinking, and emotional withdrawal. The outcomes vary, but antipsychotic drugs generally help; thioridazine is one such drug. It had been thought to be effective and less prone to cause the movement disorders that can happen particularly with the older generation antipsychotics. Largely thioridazine has been withdrawn due to its links with abnormal heart rhythm but is still used in special circumstances.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Antipsychotic Medicines for Treating Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder: A Review of the Research for Adults and Caregivers

This summary talks about one type of medicine—antipsychotics— used to treat schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. It will tell you what research says about how older and newer antipsychotics compare for treating schizophrenia and bipolar disorder in adults. Please note that the research on antipsychotics as treatment for bipolar disorder is limited, and more research is needed. This summary will also tell you about the possible side effects of antipsychotics. It can help you talk with your doctor about whether or not one of these antipsychotic medicines might be right for you.

Comparative Effectiveness Review Summary Guides for Consumers [Internet] - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: April 10, 2013

First-Generation Versus Second-Generation Antipsychotics in Adults: Comparative Effectiveness [Internet]

To compare individual first-generation antipsychotics (FGAs) with individual second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) in adults (18 to 64 years) with schizophrenia, schizophrenia-related psychoses, or bipolar disorder, with a focus on core illness symptoms, functional outcomes, health care system utilization, and adverse events.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: August 2012
Show search results within this document

First- and Second-Generation Antipsychotics for Children and Young Adults [Internet]

To review and synthesize the evidence on first-generation antipsychotics (FGA) and second-generation antipsychotics (SGA) for the treatment of various psychiatric and behavioral conditions in children, adolescents, and young adults (ages ≤ 24 years).

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: February 2012
Show search results within this document

Drug Class Review: Second-Generation Antidepressants: Final Update 5 Report [Internet]

We compared the effectiveness and harms of second-generation antidepressants in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD), dysthymia, subsyndromal depression, seasonal affective disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, social anxiety disorder, and premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: March 2011
Show search results within this document

Dementia: A NICE-SCIE Guideline on Supporting People With Dementia and Their Carers in Health and Social Care

This guideline has been developed to advise on supporting people with dementia and their carers in health and social care. The guideline recommendations have been developed by a multidisciplinary team of health and social care professionals, a person with dementia, carers and guideline methodologists after careful consideration of the best available evidence. It is intended that the guideline will be useful to practitioners and service commissioners in providing and planning high-quality care for those with dementia while also emphasising the importance of the experience of care for people with dementia and carers.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (UK).

Version: 2007
Show search results within this document

Screening for Dementia [Internet]

To produce an evidence-based review to support recommendations from the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) concerning dementia syndrome screening in primary care settings.

Systematic Evidence Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: June 2003
Show search results within this document

Drug Class Review: Atypical Antipsychotic Drugs: Final Update 3 Report [Internet]

Atypical antipsychotic agents are used to treat the symptoms of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The purpose of this review is to help policy makers and clinicians make informed choices about their use. Given the prominent role of drug therapy in psychiatric disease, our goal is to summarize comparative data on efficacy, effectiveness, tolerability, and safety. Ten atypical antipsychotics are currently available in the United States and Canada. Clozapine, the prototypic atypical antipsychotic, was introduced in 1989. Since then, 9 other atypical antipsychotics have been brought to market: risperidone (1993), risperidone long-acting injection (2003), olanzapine (1996), quetiapine (1997), ziprasidone (2001), aripiprazole (2002), extended-release paliperidone (2006), asenapine (2009), iloperidone (2009), and paliperidone long-acting injection (2009).

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: July 2010
Show search results within this document

Efficacy and tolerability of benzodiazepines for the treatment of behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

The objective of this review is to summarize the available data on the use of benzodiazepines for the treatment of behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) from randomized controlled trials (RCTs). A systematic search of 5 major databases, PubMed, MEDLINE, PsychINFO, EMBASE, and Cochrane Collaboration, yielded a total of 5 RCTs. One study compared diazepam to thioridazine, 1 trial compared oxazepam to haloperidol and diphenhydramine, 1 trial compared alprazolam to lorazepam, 1 trial compared lorazepam to haloperidol, and 1 trial compared intramuscular (IM) lorazepam to IM olanzapine and placebo. The data indicates that in 4 of the 5 studies, there was no significant difference in efficacy between the active drugs to treat the symptoms of BPSD. One study indicated that thioridazine may have better efficacy than diazepam for treating symptoms of BPSD. In 1 study, the active drugs had greater efficacy in treating BPSD when compared to placebo. There was no significant difference between the active drugs in terms of tolerability. However, in 2 of the 5 studies, about a third of the patients were noted to have dropped out of the studies. Available data, although limited, do not support the routine use of benzodiazepines for the treatment of BPSD. But these drugs may be used in certain circumstances where other psychotropic medications are unsafe for use in individuals with BPSD or when there are significant medication allergies or tolerability issues with certain classes of psychotropic medications.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Pharmacological treatment of neuropsychiatric symptoms of dementia: a review of the evidence

This review concluded that of the drugs used for treating neuropsychiatric symptoms of dementia, risperidone and olanzapine had the best evidence for efficacy although their effect sizes were modest and they increased the risk of stroke. This conclusion appears reasonable. However, there was only a small evidence base for most of the drugs considered in the review.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2005

Penfluridol for schizophrenia

Synopsis pending.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Treatment for amphetamine psychosis

A minority of individuals who use amphetamines develop full‐blown psychosis requiring care at emergency departments or psychiatric hospitals. In such cases, symptoms of amphetamine psychosis commonly include paranoid and persecutory delusions as well as auditory and visual hallucinations in the presence of extreme agitation. More common (about 18%) is for frequent amphetamine users to report psychotic symptoms that are sub‐clinical and that do not require high‐intensity intervention. Clinical reports suggest the development of amphetamine psychosis and of sub‐clinical psychosis symptoms is related to the individual's lifetime history of amphetamine use, i.e., cumulative quantity and frequency of exposure to amphetamines. In one of the only randomised trials of antipsychotic medications for treating amphetamine psychosis, Leelahanaj (2005) reported that olanzapine and haloperidol delivered at clinically relevant doses both showed similar efficacy in resolving psychotic symptoms (93% and 79%, respectively), with olanzapine showing significantly greater safety and tolerability than haloperidol as measured by frequency and severity of extrapyramidal symptoms. These outcomes are consistent with treatments for schizophrenia indicating equivalent efficacy between atypical anti‐psychotics and conventional anti‐psychotics, mostly haloperidol with older drugs causing more severe side effects (Leucht 1999).While anti‐psychotic medications demonstrate efficacy in providing short‐term relief when a heavy user of amphetamines experiences psychosis, there is no evidence to guide decisions regarding long‐term clinical care using these medications for preventing relapse to psychosis.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

New generation antipsychotics versus low-potency conventional antipsychotics: a systematic review and meta-analysis

This review assessed whether new-generation antipsychotic drugs cause fewer extra-pyramidal side effects (EPS) than low-potency conventional antipsychotics. The authors concluded that new-generation drugs might cause EPS equivalent to optimum doses of conventional treatments, and that these drugs might be more effective than conventional treatments. This was a well-conducted review which pointed to the need for further trials in this area.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2003

Antipsychotic medication for elderly people with schizophrenia

Since the early 1950's the mainstay of treatment for schizophrenia has been drugs such as haloperidol and chlorpromazine. Although effective in controlling voices and fixed, false beliefs, these drugs are reported as having potentially disabling adverse effects such as tremor, stiffness and slowing of movement. The newer generation of drugs are reputed to be freer from these problems. This is particularly important for older people, who are more likely to experience adverse effects. Most manufacturers recommend prescription of reduced doses in the elderly.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

Antipsychotic medication for early episode schizophrenia

There are only a few good quality studies comparing the acute treatment of early episode schizophrenia with an antipsychotic medication compared to placebo or psychosocial treatment. It appears that initial medication treatment reduces the study attrition rates while also increasing the risk for medication‐induced side effects. Data are too limited to assess the effects of initial antipsychotic medication treatment on outcomes for individuals with an early episode of schizophrenia.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Perphenazine versus low‐potency first‐generation drugs for schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is a severe mental illness where people experience ‘positive symptoms’ (such as hearing voices, seeing things and having strange beliefs) and ‘negative symptoms’ (such as tiredness, apathy and loss of emotion).

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Impact of psychotropic medications on simulated driving: a critical review

This review assessed the impact of psychotropic medications on simulated driving and concluded that impairments varied with the population studied, dose and time of testing, but were most commonly associated with benzodiazepines and tricyclic antidepressants. Overall, the reliability of these conclusions is limited by the poor reporting of the review methods and the apparent methodological limitations of the study data.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2007

Efficacy and tolerability of second-generation antipsychotics in children and adolescents with schizophrenia

The authors concluded that antipsychotic medications significantly reduce the symptoms of early-onset schizophrenia spectrum disorder in children and adolescents, but extrapyramidal symptoms, sedation, prolactin elevation and weight gain are common. Although these conclusions appear justified by the data presented, it is difficult to assess their reliability given the rather limited search and poor reporting of the review.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2008

Evidence-based review of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatments for older adults with schizophrenia

This review assessed the efficacy and safety of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions for older adults with schizophrenia. The authors concluded that limited evidence suggests that these interventions can benefit older patients, but further research is required. The lack of a description of review methods and the use of multiple outcomes make it difficult to comment on the reliability of the evidence.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2005

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

See all (33)...

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...