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Treats or helps prevent infections caused by certain types of bacteria. This medicine is an antibiotic.

UsesSide effectsLatest evidence reviewsResearch summaries for consumersBrand names

Results: 15

Procaine is a controversial substance that has been used for "antiageing" effects including cognitive improvement for more than 50 years

Preparations which contain procaine as a component are widely promoted and used in several countries.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

Management of Acute Otitis Media: Update

Acute Otitis Media (AOM), a viral or bacterial infection of the ear, is the most common childhood infection for which antibiotics are prescribed in the United States. In 2001, the Southern California Evidence-based Practice Center conducted a systematic review of the evidence comparing treatments of AOM.

Evidence Reports/Technology Assessments - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: November 2010
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Temporary pain in the lower extremities following spinal anaesthesia with lidocaine compared to other local anaesthetics

Lidocaine is the drug of choice for inducing spinal anaesthesia in ambulatory surgery because of its rapid onset of action, intense nerve blockade, and short duration of action. The possible side effects of spinal anaesthesia in adults, which develop after recovery, are backache, post‐dural puncture headache, and transient neurologic symptoms that are characterized by slight to severe pain in the buttocks and legs. TNS symptoms develop within a few hours and up to 24 hours after anaesthesia. They last, in most cases, up to two days. The present review shows that lidocaine is more likely to cause transient neurologic symptoms than bupivacaine, prilocaine, and procaine. However, these drugs produce prolonged local anaesthetic effects and therefore are not desirable for ambulatory patients. It is possible that the reintroduction of 2‐chloroprocaine will solve this lack of a suitable intrathecal local anaesthetic; confirmatory studies are needed.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Systemic administration of local anesthetic agents to relieve neuropathic pain

Intravenous lidocaine and oral derivatives relieve pain from damage to the nervous system (neuropathic pain). In early reports, intravenous lidocaine and its oral analogs mexiletine and tocainide relieved neuropathic pain, a type of pain caused by disease in the nervous system. However, the evidence was conflicting. The authors reviewed all randomized studies comparing these drugs with placebo or with other analgesics and found that: local anesthetics were superior to placebo in decreasing intensity of neuropathic pain; limited data showed no difference in efficacy or adverse effects between local anesthetics and carbamazepine, amantadine, gabapentin or morphine; local anesthetics had more adverse effects than placebo; and local anesthetics were safe.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

The effects of water compared with other solutions for wound cleansing

Water is frequently used for cleaning wounds to prevent infection. This can be tap water, distilled water, cooled boiled water or saline (salty water). Using tap water to cleanse acute wounds in adults does not increase the infection rate; however, there is no strong evidence that cleansing per se is better than not cleansing. The reviewers concluded that where tap water is high quality (drinkable), it may be as good as other methods such as sterile water or saline (salty) water (and more cost‐effective), but more research is needed.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Parenteral analgesics for pain relief in acute pancreatitis: a systematic review

AIM: To assess the efficiency and safety of parenteral analgesics for pain relief in acute pancreatitis.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Opioids for abdominal pain in acute pancreatitis

The pancreas is a gland behind the stomach and close to the first part of the small intestine. It produces digestive juices, amylase, secreted into the small intestine and releases hormones, insulin and glucagon, into the bloodstream. Acute pancreatitis refers to a sudden inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive juices become active inside the pancreas, causing swelling, bleeding and damage to the pancreas and its blood vessels. It is a serious condition and can lead to further problems. Common symptoms are severe pain in the upper abdomen, nausea, and vomiting. Treatment is usually a few days in hospital for fluids, antibiotics, and medicines to relieve pain, delivered by drip.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Acute middle ear infections: Treatment

Children who have an acute middle ear infection (acute otitis media) usually have earache and a fever. They sleep badly, are restless and cry a lot. As a result, parents often have sleepless nights too. But the infection usually clears up on its own within two to three days. What are the treatment options and when is it important to seek medical advice?

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: May 7, 2013

Antibiotics for Early-Onset Neonatal Infection: Antibiotics for the Prevention and Treatment of Early-Onset Neonatal Infection

Early-onset neonatal bacterial infection (infection with onset within 72 hours of birth) is a significant cause of mortality and morbidity in newborn babies. Parent organisations and the scientific literature report that there can be unnecessary delays in recognising and treating sick babies. In addition, concern about the possibility of early-onset neonatal infection is common. This concern is an important influence on the care given to pregnant women and newborn babies. There is wide variation in how the risk of early-onset neonatal infection is managed in healthy babies. The approach taken by the NHS needs to: prioritise the treatment of sick babies, minimise the impact of management pathways on healthy women and babies, use antibiotics wisely to avoid the development of resistance to antibiotics. These drivers have not always been addressed consistently in the NHS, and this guideline was commissioned to ensure they would be addressed in future.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: August 2012
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Oral antibiotics appear to be as effective as parenteral antibiotics in the treatment of severe pneumonia in children

Acute respiratory infection (including pneumonia) is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in children under five years of age in developing countries. Antibiotics are needed when a bacterial infection is suspected. When children are hospitalised they often receive injectable antibiotics. This has disadvantages: pain, risk of other infections and cost. There are studies that show that oral antibiotics are effective when children are treated as outpatients. The objective of this review was to determine the effectiveness and safety of oral antibiotics compared to parenteral antibiotics in the treatment of pneumonia in children less than five years old. Oral therapy appears to be an effective and safe alternative to parenteral antibiotics in hospitalised children with severe pneumonia who do not have any serious signs or symptoms. There is currently insufficient evidence to determine the relative benefits and harms of oral antibiotics in children with severe pneumonia if serious signs and symptoms are present or in children with severe pneumonia associated with bacterial confirmation or lobar consolidation on chest X‐ray.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Interventions for pityriasis rosea, skin rash of unknown cause

Pityriasis rosea is a scaly rash that mostly affects young adults. It is relatively common and affects about 170 out of every 100,000 people in the community each year. The first sign is a patch of scales, usually on the trunk. A generalised eruption then follows and all lesions disappear within 2 to 12 weeks. This review is important because about 50% of people with pityriasis rosea experience moderate to severe itch. It is not known whether the current treatments, which include tablets, creams, and ultra‐violet radiation, are useful and whether the benefits outweigh the risk of adverse effects.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Bacterial Meningitis and Meningococcal Septicaemia: Management of Bacterial Meningitis and Meningococcal Septicaemia in Children and Young People Younger than 16 Years in Primary and Secondary Care

This guideline covers bacterial meningitis and meningococcal septicaemia, focusing on management of these conditions in children and young people aged younger than 16 years in primary and secondary care, and using evidence of direct relevance to these age groups where available.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: 2010
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Diagnosis and Treatment of Erectile Dysfunction

To systematically review the evidence on efficacy and harms of pharmaceutical treatments used in the management of male erectile dysfunction (ED); to explore the clinical utility of routine hormonal blood tests (e.g. testosterone, prolactin) for identifying and treating hormonal disorders and thereby affecting therapeutic outcomes for ED.

Evidence Reports/Technology Assessments - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: May 2009
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The Clinical Effectiveness and Cost-Effectiveness of Management Strategies for Sciatica: Systematic Review and Economic Model

Sciatica is a symptom characterised by well-localised leg pain with a sharp, shooting or burning quality that radiates down the back of the leg and normally to the foot or ankle. It is often associated with numbness or altered sensation in the leg.

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Evaluation, Trials and Studies Coordinating Centre (UK).

Version: November 2011
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Surgical Site Infection: Prevention and Treatment of Surgical Site Infection

Infections that occur in the wound created by an invasive surgical procedure are generally referred to as surgical site infections (SSIs). SSIs are one of the most important causes of healthcare-associated infections (HCAIs). A prevalence survey undertaken in 2006 suggested that approximately 8% of patients in hospital in the UK have an HCAI. SSIs accounted for 14% of these infections and nearly 5% of patients who had undergone a surgical procedure were found to have developed an SSI. However, prevalence studies tend to underestimate SSI because many of these infections occur after the patient has been discharged from hospital.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: October 2008
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Systematic Reviews in PubMed

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