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Treats many diseases and conditions, especially problems related to inflammation. This medicine is a steroid.

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Results: 21 to 40 of 166

The Clinical Effectiveness and Cost-Effectiveness of Bortezomib and Thalidomide in Combination Regimens with an Alkylating Agent and a Corticosteroid for the First-Line Treatment of Multiple Myeloma: A Systematic Review and Economic Evaluation

Multiple myeloma (MM) is the second most common haematological cancer in the UK. MM is not curable but can be treated with a combination of supportive measures and chemotherapy that aim to extend the duration and quality of survival. The majority of patients are not able to withstand intensive treatment, such as high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplantation (SCT), and so they are offered single-agent or combination chemotherapy. Combination therapies typically include chemotherapy with an alkylating agent and a corticosteroid. More recently, combination therapies have incorporated drugs such as thalidomide (Thalidomide Celgene®, Celgene) and bortezomib (Velcade®, Janssen–Cilag).

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Evaluation, Trials and Studies Coordinating Centre (UK).

Version: December 2011
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Management of Chronic Hepatitis B

Synthesize evidence of the natural history of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and effects and harms of antiviral drugs on clinical, virological, histological, and biochemical outcomes.

Evidence Reports/Technology Assessments - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: October 2008
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Lactose Intolerance and Health

We systematically reviewed evidence to determine lactose intolerance (LI) prevalence, bone health after dairy-exclusion diets, tolerable dose of lactose in subjects with diagnosed LI, and management.

Evidence Reports/Technology Assessments - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: February 2010
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Drug Class Review: Nasal Corticosteroids: Final Report Update 1 [Internet]

Nasal corticosteroids are a safe and effective treatment option for both allergic and non-allergic rhinitis. There are currently 8 different nasal corticosteroid preparations on the U.S. market. The nasal sprays differ with respect to delivery device and propellant, as well as potency and dosing frequency. The purpose of this review is evaluating the comparative evidence on the benefits and harms of the nasal corticosteroids to help policy makers and clinicians make informed choices.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: June 2008
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First- and Second-Generation Antipsychotics for Children and Young Adults [Internet]

To review and synthesize the evidence on first-generation antipsychotics (FGA) and second-generation antipsychotics (SGA) for the treatment of various psychiatric and behavioral conditions in children, adolescents, and young adults (ages ≤ 24 years).

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: February 2012
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Screening and Diagnosing Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

There is uncertainty as to the optimal approach for screening and diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Based on systematic reviews published in 2003 and 2008, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force concluded that there was insufficient evidence upon which to make a recommendation regarding routine screening of all pregnant women.

Evidence Reports/Technology Assessments - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: October 2012
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Deflazacort for the treatment of Duchenne Dystrophy: a systematic review

This review assessed the effectiveness and tolerability of deflazacort (DFZ) for improving strength in children with Duchenne Dystrophy. The authors concluded that DFZ improves strength and functional outcomes compared with placebo, but it remains unclear whether DFZ has a benefit over prednisone. The authors' conclusions are based mostly on the results of one very small trial that reported a large number of outcome measures.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2003

Practice parameter: corticosteroid treatment of Duchenne dystrophy. Report of the Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and the Practice Committee of the Child Neurology Society

This review assessed the effects of corticosteroids in boys with Duchenne dystrophy. It concluded that prednisone can improve muscle strength and function and pulmonary function, and that deflazacort also provides similar benefits. This conclusion was supported by the results presented; however, poor reporting of review methods and study details make it difficult to confirm the reliability of the authors' conclusions.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2005

Safety of thalidomide in newly diagnosed elderly myeloma patients: a meta-analysis of data from individual patients in six randomized trials

Treatment with melphalan-prednisone-thalidomide improves the outcome of patients with multiple myeloma and is now considered a standard of care for patients not eligible for transplantation. However, this treatment is a major source of morbidity. A meta-analysis of data from individual patients (n=1680) in six randomized trials was performed, comparing the effects of melphalan-prednisone-thalidomide versus melphalan-prednisone. The main objective was to estimate the risk of serious adverse events and their impact on outcome. The primary endpoints were the 2-year cumulative incidence of grade 3-4 hematologic and non-hematologic toxicities. At least 75% of the grade 3-4 toxicities occurred during the first 6 months of treatment in both treatment groups. The cumulative incidence of grade 3-4 hematologic toxicities was higher in the melphalan-prednisone-thalidomide group than in the melphalan-prednisone group (28% versus 22%; HR 1.32, 95% CI 1.05-1.66) as was the cumulative incidence of non-hematologic toxicities (39% versus 17%, HR 2.78, 95% CI 2.21-3.50). Grade 3-4 non-hematologic toxicities were significantly increased in patients with poor Performance Status. Occurrence of grade 3-4 non-hematologic toxicities had a negative impact on both progression-free survival (HR 1.24, 95% CI 1.07-1.45) and overall survival, (HR 1.23, 95% CI 1.03-1.47). Besides toxicities, progression-free and overall survival were also negatively affected by advanced International Staging System stage, high creatinine levels and poor Performance Status. Age had a negative impact on survival as well. Although melphalan-prednisone-thalidomide improved outcome, it increased toxicities, especially non-hematologic ones. Serious non-hematologic toxicities, older age, poor Performance Status, and high creatinine levels negatively affected survival.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Immunosuppressive treatment for focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in adults

Focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is a rare disease whose cause is unknown and is a condition in which the glomeruli leak protein from the blood into the urine. It is described as focal because only some of the glomeruli become scarred (while others remain normal) and segmental as only part of an individual glomerulus is damaged. Over half of all persons with FSGS will develop chronic kidney failure within 10 years. Thus, immunosuppressive strategies are used to control proteinuria and prevent kidney failure. This systematic review identified four studies (108 participants) investigating immunosuppressive treatments for adults with biopsy‐proven FSGS. Adult patients treated with cyclosporin A in combination with prednisone were more likely to achieve partial remission of nephrotic syndrome compared with prednisone alone, however this result is based on only one small study. No data was available on the progression to kidney failure or death.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Interventions to prevent or treat serious kidney disease in patients with Henoch‐Schönlein Purpura

Henoch‐Schönlein Purpura (HSP) causes inflammation of small blood vessels in children and affects approximately 20/100,000 children annually. Symptoms and signs include a purpuric skin rash (which comprises small spots and larger bruises), abdominal pain, gastrointestinal bleeding, joint pain and swelling, facial swelling and evidence of kidney disease with blood and protein in the urine. Kidney disease occurs in about one third of children with HSP. In the majority this is mild (small amounts of blood in the urine only) and resolves completely but a few children have persistent kidney disease that can progress to kidney failure. Treatments with medications that suppress the immune system (prednisone) and treatments to prevent blood clotting (aspirin, heparin) have been administered to children at diagnosis to prevent serious kidney disease. Also treatments which suppress the immune system (prednisone, methylprednisolone, cyclophosphamide and cyclosporin) have been used in an attempt to treat serious kidney disease in HSP and prevent progression to kidney failure.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

The effectiveness of low‐dose corticosteroids in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis disease activity over the moderate term

Low dose corticosteroid use in RA is currently widespread with up to 80% of patients using prednisone or similar corticosteroid preparations in many arthritis practices, but the value of corticosteroids for the treatment of RA has been debated by several authors.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Dexamethasone for acute asthma exacerbations in children: a meta-analysis

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Dexamethasone has been proposed as an equivalent therapy to prednisone/prednisolone for acute asthma exacerbations in pediatric patients. Although multiple small trials exist, clear consensus data are lacking. This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to determine whether intramuscular or oral dexamethasone is equivalent or superior to a 5-day course of oral prednisone or prednisolone. The primary outcome of interest was return visits or hospital readmissions.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Interventions for minimal change disease in adults with nephrotic syndrome

Nephrotic syndrome is a condition where the kidneys leak protein from the blood into the urine. Minimal change disease is the third most common primary kidney disease in adults with unexplained nephrotic syndrome (10% to 15%). Steroids have been used widely since the early 1970s for the treatment of adult‐onset minimal change disease, however the optimal agent, dose and duration has not been determined. This review identified three small studies (68 participants) comparing: 1) intravenous plus oral steroid treatment versus oral sterids; 2) oral versus short‐course intravenous steroid treatment; and 3) oral steroid treatment versus placebo. Only oral steroid treatment (compared to short‐course intravenous steroid treatment) showed an increase in the number of patients who achieved complete remission. However, the lack of available studies leaves important treatment questions unanswered; what is the optimal dose and duration of steroid treatment in new‐onset adult minimal change disease; how are relapses following steroid‐induced remission prevented and treated; and what are the appropriate treatments for steroid‐dependent or treatment‐resistant minimal change disease?

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Corticosteroid drugs for several months after a child has nephrotic syndrome can reduce repeat episodes

Nephrotic syndrome is a condition where the kidneys leak protein from the blood into the urine. Most children who experience this syndrome have repeat episodes. When it is untreated, children can often die from infections. Corticosteroid drugs (prednisone, prednisolone) are used to treat nephrotic syndrome and so reduce the risk of these infections, but the drugs can also have serious side effects. This review identified 24 trials evaluating 1726 children. Continuing to take corticosteroid medications for several months after the first episode of nephrotic syndrome has an increasing ability to reduce the risk of relapses, without an increase in serious side effects.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

Thalidomide versus bortezomib based regimens as first-line therapy for patients with multiple myeloma: a systematic review

The review concluded that was unclear whether thalidomide or bortezomib (both with melphalan and prednisone) was superior for treating patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. Head-to-head comparisons were recommended. The review was limited in some respects, including a rather narrow search, but the authors? cautious conclusions appear justified.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

Cyclosporin may increase the number of children who achieve complete remission in steroid‐resistant nephrotic syndrome. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors significantly reduce the degree of proteinuria

Nephrotic syndrome is a condition where the kidneys leak protein from the blood into the urine. Corticosteroids are used in the first instance to achieve remission. Some children do not respond to this treatment and other agents such as cyclophosphamide, chlorambucil, cyclosporin or ACE inhibitors may be used. This review found that when cyclosporin was compared to placebo or no treatment there was a significant increase in the number of children who achieved complete remission. Cyclosporin also significantly increased the number of children, who achieved complete or partial remission compared with IV cyclophosphamide. There was no improvement with other immunosuppressive agents. However the number of studies was small. More research is needed.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

Interventions for mucous membrane pemphigoid and epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (rare autoimmune blistering diseases of the skin, eyes and mouth)

Mucous membrane pemphigoid and epidermolysis bullosa acquisita are rare autoimmune blistering diseases of the skin and mucous membranes (eyes and mouth). They can result in scarring, which may lead to disabling and life threatening complications. Treatments include corticosteroids, mycophenolate mofetil and cyclophosphamide to suppress the immune system, and less toxic drugs such as antibiotics. These diseases often progress despite treatment. There is some evidence that mucous membrane pemphigoid involving the eyes may respond better to treatment with cyclophosphamide combined with corticosteroids, compared to treatment with corticosteroids alone. Cyclophosphamide is, however, associated with potentially severe adverse effects. Dapsone may help moderate disease. More research is needed to identify the most effective treatment options.There is not enough reliable evidence about treatments for the rare blistering diseases, mucous membrane pemphigoid and epidermolysis bullosa acquisita.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Treatments for bullous pemphigoid

Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is the most common autoimmune blistering disease in the West. Incidence figures are not available for most parts of the world but BP appears to be rarer in the Far East. Bullous pemphigoid is usually a disease of the elderly but it can also affect younger people and children. Both sexes are similarly affected. While BP usually resolves within five years, there is a moderate death rate associated with the disease and its treatment. Oral corticosteroid drugs are the most common treatment, but may be associated with serious adverse effects, including some deaths. The most common adverse effects of oral steroids, include weight gain and high blood pressure. Long‐term use is associated with an increased risk of diabetes mellitus and decreased bone density. Topical steroids are also associated with adverse effects, such as thinning of the skin and easy bruising. The risk of experiencing adverse effects of topical steroids depends on the strength of the steroid, how long it is used for, which area of the body it is applied to, and the kind of skin problem; if a high‐strength, potent steroid is used, enough may be absorbed through the skin to cause adverse effects in the rest of the body.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

The clinical effectiveness and cost effectiveness of bortezomib and thalidomide in combination regimens with an alkylating agent and a corticosteroid for the first-line treatment of multiple myeloma: a systematic review and economic evaluation

This review concluded that bortezomib or thalidomide in combination with melphalan and prednisolone/prednisone could be considered more effective than melphalan and prednisolone/prednisone for the first-line treatment of multiple myeloma. Further head-to-head trials of bortezomib- and thalidomide-containing combination regimens were required. These conclusions reflect limitations in the evidence base and are likely to be reliable.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

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