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Nadroparin is used to prevent and treat deep vein thrombosis, a condition in which harmful blood clots form in the blood vessels of the legs.

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Results: 13

Pharmacologic and Mechanical Prophylaxis of Venous Thromboembolism Among Special Populations [Internet]

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a prevalent and avoidable complication of hospitalization. Patients hospitalized with trauma, traumatic brain injury, burns, or liver disease; patients on antiplatelet therapy; obese or underweight patients; those having obesity surgery; or with acute or chronic renal failure have unequal risks for bleeding and thrombosis and may benefit differently from prophylactic therapy medication.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: May 2013
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Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis in Orthopedic Surgery [Internet]

This is an evidence report prepared by the University of Connecticut/Hartford Hospital Evidence-based Practice Center (EPC) examining the comparative efficacy and safety of prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism in major orthopedic surgery (total hip replacement [THR], total knee replacement [TKR], and hip fracture surgery [HFS]) and other nonmajor orthopedic surgeries (knee arthroscopy, injuries distal to the hip requiring surgery, and elective spine surgery).

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: March 2012
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Comparison of the efficacy and safety of low molecular weight heparins for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in medically ill patients

OBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic review and mixed-treatment comparison (MTC) meta-analysis to compare the efficacy and safety of low molecular weight heparins (LMWHs) for venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis in hospitalized medically ill patients. As a secondary objective we compared all therapies within the network to each other.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Meta-analysis of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in medically ill patients

This review concluded that low molecular weight heparin prophylaxis in medically ill patients can reduce rates of deep vein thrombosis, but does not offer enhanced protection against pulmonary embolism. The conduct of this review was generally good, but the reliability of the conclusions cannot be assessed given that details of individual study results and between-study differences were lacking.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2007

Aspirin and/or heparin for women with unexplained recurrent miscarriage with or without inherited thrombophilia

Recurrent miscarriage is associated with inherited blood clotting disorders that could interfere with the placental blood circulation. Recurrent miscarriage can also be unexplained, with no known cause. Anticoagulant drugs such as aspirin or low molecular weight heparin may help women with recurrent miscarriage and such an underlying blood clotting problem. These drugs may also cause bleeding (including nose bleeds and haematomas) in the mother, though not in the baby. Data from nine included randomised controlled trials (involving 1228 women) analysed in this review, provided no evidence to support the use of anticoagulants in women with recurrent miscarriage, regardless of the presence of inherited blood clotting disorders (thrombophilia).

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Use of low-molecular-weight heparins in the management of acute coronary artery syndromes and percutaneous coronary intervention

This review compared the effectiveness of low molecular weight heparins (LMWHs) with unfractionated heparin for the treatment of acute coronary syndromes, and as an adjunct to percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The authors concluded that LMWHs could potentially replace unfractionated heparin as the antithrombotic treatment of choice across the spectrum of acute coronary syndromes, and may also be effective for PCI. Since the review methodology was unclear and could be subject to many biases, the authors' conclusions may not be robust.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2003

Venous Thromboembolism: Reducing the Risk of Venous Thromboembolism (Deep Vein Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism) in Patients Admitted to Hospital

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a term used to include the formation of a blood clot (a thrombus) in a vein which may dislodge from its site of origin to travel in the blood, a phenomenon called embolism. A thrombus most commonly occurs in the deep veins of the legs; this is called deep vein thrombosis. A dislodged thrombus that travels to the lungs is known as a pulmonary embolism.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre – Acute and Chronic Conditions (UK).

Version: 2010
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Antiplatelet and Anticoagulant Treatments for Unstable Angina/Non–ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction [Internet]

For patients with unstable angina or non–ST elevation myocardial infarction (UA/NSTEMI), antiplatelet and anticoagulant medications are prescribed to reduce and prevent ischemic events and mortality. There is uncertainty about the optimal dosing and timing of these medications to balance ischemic risk and bleeding risk across different treatment strategies (early invasive, initial conservative, and postdischarge).

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: November 2013
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Anticoagulation for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis

Blood thinning (anticoagulant) drugs may be beneficial for patients with clotting of the veins that surround the brain (sinus thrombosis). Sinus thrombosis is a rare condition where blood clots form in the veins that drain blood from the brain. However, anticoagulant drugs, which are often used to treat sinus thrombosis, carry a risk of bleeding. We only found two small trials involving 79 patients; the results of the review suggested that anticoagulant drugs are probably safe and may be beneficial for people with sinus thrombosis but these results are not conclusive.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Adjunctive benefits from low-molecular-weight heparins as compared to unfractionated heparin among patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction treated with thrombolysis: a meta-analysis of the randomized trials

This review found that low molecular weight heparins are associated with a reduction in reinfarction and a trend towards reduced mortality, but with a higher risk of major bleeding complications, compared with unfractionated heparin. These conclusions are likely to be reliable, but should be interpreted with some degree of caution given the failure to assess the validity of the included studies.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2007

Venous Thromboembolic Diseases: The Management of Venous Thromboembolic Diseases and the Role of Thrombophilia Testing [Internet]

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a condition in which a blood clot (a thrombus) forms in a vein and then dislodges to travel in the blood (an embolus). A venous thrombus most commonly occurs in the deep veins of the legs or pelvis; this is then called a deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Blood flow through the affected vein can be limited by the clot, and it can cause swelling and pain in the leg. If it dislodges and travels to the lungs, to the pulmonary arteries, it is called a pulmonary embolism (PE), which in some cases may be fatal. VTE as a term includes both DVT and PE. Major risk factors for VTE include a prior history of DVT, age over 60 years, surgery, obesity, prolonged travel, acute medical illness, cancer, immobility, thrombophilia (an abnormal tendency for the blood to clot) and pregnancy.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: June 2012
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Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation [Internet]

Oral anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) has long been the gold standard therapy for stroke prevention in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF). Limitations in monitoring and compliance of VKAs have fueled the development of new antithrombotic strategies, devices, and oral anticoagulants, including oral direct thrombin inhibitors and factor Xa inhibitors. This review updates previous reviews, particularly with regard to these newer treatment options and the optimal risk stratification tools for stroke and bleeding prediction.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: August 2013
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Stroke: National Clinical Guideline for Diagnosis and Initial Management of Acute Stroke and Transient Ischaemic Attack (TIA)

This guideline covers interventions in the acute stage of a stroke (‘acute stroke’) or transient ischaemic attack (TIA). Most of the evidence considered relates to interventions in the first 48 hours after onset of symptoms, although some interventions of up to 2 weeks are covered as well. This guideline is a stand-alone document, but is designed to be read alongside the Intercollegiate Stroke Working Party guideline ‘National clinical guideline for stroke’ which considers evidence for interventions from the acute stage into rehabilitation and life after stroke. The Intercollegiate Stroke Working Party guideline is an update of the 2004 2nd edition and includes all the recommendations contained within this guideline. This acute stroke and TIA guideline is also designed to be read alongside the Department of Health’s (DH) ‘National stroke strategy’ (NSS). Where there are differences between the recommendations made within this acute stroke and TIA guideline and the NSS, the Guideline Development Group (GDG) members feel that their recommendations are derived from systematic methodology to identify all of the relevant literature.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Chronic Conditions (UK).

Version: 2008
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Systematic Reviews in PubMed

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