Home > Search Results
  • We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information

Treats symptoms of osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This medicine is an NSAID.

UsesSide effectsLatest evidence reviewsResearch summaries for consumersBrand names

Results: 1 to 20 of 27

Cyclooxygenase-2 selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (etodolac, meloxicam, celecoxib, rofecoxib, etoricoxib, valdecoxib and lumiracoxib) for osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review and economic evaluation

This review evaluated the effectiveness of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) for osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. The authors concluded that COX-2 selective NSAIDs were similar to non-selective NSAIDs for the symptomatic relief of these conditions and provided superior GI tolerability. This was a well-conducted review and the authors' conclusions were likely to be reliable.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2008

Single dose oral meloxicam for acute postoperative pain in adults

Pain is commonly experienced after surgical procedures. The condition is usually used to test whether or not drugs are effective painkillers in participants with moderate or severe pain. In this case we could find no studies that tested oral meloxicam against placebo. It is possible that the studies were done, but not reported, because they were used only to register meloxicam with licensing authorities throughout the world. However, this leaves an important gap in our knowledge, and it means that we cannot be confident about using oral meloxicam for acute painful conditions.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Cyclooxygenase-2 selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (etodolac, meloxicam, celecoxib, rofecoxib, etoricoxib, valdecoxib and lumiracoxib) for osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review and economic evaluation

The objectives were to review the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (etodolac, meloxicam, celecoxib, rofecoxib, etoricoxib, valdecoxib and lumiracoxib) for osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme: Executive Summaries - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: 2008

Managing Osteoarthritis Pain With Medicines: A Review of the Research for Adults

This summary describes how to manage osteoarthritis pain by using a group of medicines called “analgesics” (pronounced an-al-JEEZ-iks). It also discusses the research about different types of analgesics. It talks about each medicine’s ability to relieve pain and the risks for serious side effects. It can help you talk with your doctor about managing your osteoarthritis pain. Other ways to manage pain from osteoarthritis, such as surgery, narcotic medicines, or steroids, are not included in this summary.

Comparative Effectiveness Review Summary Guides for Consumers [Internet] - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: February 15, 2012

Comparing NSAIDs

How do NSAIDs compare in reducing pain?

PubMed Clinical Q&A [Internet] - National Center for Biotechnology Information (US).

Version: May 1, 2011

Analgesics for Osteoarthritis: An Update of the 2006 Comparative Effectiveness Review [Internet]

To update a previous report on the comparative benefits and harms of oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), acetaminophen, over-the-counter supplements (chondroitin and glucosamine), and topical agents (NSAIDs and rubefacients, including capsaicin) for osteoarthritis.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: October 2011
Show search results within this document

Dementia: A NICE-SCIE Guideline on Supporting People With Dementia and Their Carers in Health and Social Care

This guideline has been developed to advise on supporting people with dementia and their carers in health and social care. The guideline recommendations have been developed by a multidisciplinary team of health and social care professionals, a person with dementia, carers and guideline methodologists after careful consideration of the best available evidence. It is intended that the guideline will be useful to practitioners and service commissioners in providing and planning high-quality care for those with dementia while also emphasising the importance of the experience of care for people with dementia and carers.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (UK).

Version: 2007
Show search results within this document

Drug Class Review: Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs): Final Update 4 Report [Internet]

We compared the effectiveness and harms of oral or topical nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in the treatment of chronic pain from osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, soft tissue pain, back pain, and ankylosing spondylitis.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: November 2010
Show search results within this document

Efficacy and safety of piroxicam revisited: a global meta-analysis of randomised clinical trials

This review concluded that piroxicam had a similar or more favourable efficacy and safety profile compared with other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The review had a number of limitations, which mean that the authors' conclusions may not be reliable.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2009

Time dependent risk of gastrointestinal complications induced by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use: a consensus statement using a meta-analytic approach

OBJECTIVES: To provide an updated document assessing the global, NSAID-specific, and time dependent risk of gastrointestinal (GI) complications through meta-analyses of high quality studies.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2004

Intramuscular stimulation therapy for healthcare: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials

OBJECTIVE: A systematic review of randomised controlled trials was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and effectiveness of intramuscular stimulation (IMS).

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

Single dose oral sulindac for acute postoperative pain in adults

Pain is commonly experienced after surgical procedures. Postoperative pain is a good model to test whether or not drugs are effective painkillers in participants with moderate or severe pain. In this case we could find no studies that tested oral sulindac against placebo. It is possible that the studies were done, but not reported, because they were used only to register sulindac with licensing authorities throughout the world. However, this leaves an important gap in our knowledge, and it means that we cannot be confident about using oral sulindac for acute painful conditions.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Sling exercise for chronic low back pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis

BACKGROUND: Trials on sling exercise (SE), commonly performed to manage chronic low back pain (LBP), yield conflicting results. This study aimed to review the effects of SE on chronic LBP.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Myocardial infarction and individual nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs meta-analysis of observational studies

The authors concluded that the most frequently used NSAIDs in clinical practice (except for naproxen) were associated with an increased risk of acute myocardial infarction at high doses or in people with prior coronary heart disease. The diversity between the included studies means that these conclusions may be overly strong.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Individual NSAIDs and upper gastrointestinal complications: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies (the SOS Project)

BACKGROUND: The risk of upper gastrointestinal (GI) complications associated with the use of NSAIDs is a serious public health concern. The risk varies between individual NSAIDs; however, there is little information on the risk associated with some NSAIDs and on the impact of risk factors. These data are necessary to evaluate the benefit-risk of individual NSAIDs for clinical and health policy decision making. Within the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme, the Safety Of non-Steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) [SOS] project aims to develop decision models for regulatory and clinical use of individual NSAIDs according to their GI and cardiovascular safety.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and hepatic toxicity: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials in arthritis patients

This review assessed the hepatic side-effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in patients with arthritis. The authors concluded that NSAIDs did not increase liver-related serious adverse effects, hospitalisation or death, but diclofenac and rofecoxib increased aminotransferase elevations compared with placebo and other NSAIDs examined. The conclusions were drawn from indirect comparisons, hence they may not be robust.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2005

Aspirin, steroid and non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs use for treating Alzheimer's disease

Inflammation may play an important role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease. There is also some evidence from community surveys that people receiving anti‐inflammatory drugs for various medical conditions may be less likely to develop Alzheimer's disease. Fourteen studies met our inclusion criteria for this review and none of the exclusion criteria. Aspirin, steroid and non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (traditional and the selective cyclooxygenase‐2 (COX‐2) inhibitors) showed no significant benefit in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, the use of these drugs cannot be recommended for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.         

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Variability among nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs in risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding

The authors concluded that the risks of upper gastrointestinal bleeding/perforation for individual non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs varied between individual drugs; long half-life and slow-release formulations were associated with greater risks. The authors? conclusions appeared to reflect the evidence, but a restricted search and limited assessment of study quality make it difficult to assess the reliability.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2010

Analgesics for Osteoarthritis

As an update to a 2006 report, a systematic review of 273 clinical studies published between January 2005 and January 2011 examined the comparative effectiveness, benefits, and adverse effects of analgesics and the supplements glucosamine and chondroitin for osteoarthritis. The review did not include studies on opioid medications or nonpharmacological interventions for osteoarthritis. The full report, listing all studies, is available at www.effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/analgesicsupdate.cfm. This summary, based on the full report of research evidence, is provided to inform discussions with patients of options and to assist in decisionmaking along with a patient's values and preferences. However, reviews of evidence should not be construed to represent clinical recommendations or guidelines.

Comparative Effectiveness Review Summary Guides for Clinicians [Internet] - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: February 15, 2012

Comparing single doses of oral analgesics for acute pain in adults postoperation

All analgesic drugs (painkillers) are tested in standardised clinical studies of people with established pain following surgery, and often after removal of third molar (wisdom) teeth. In all these studies the participants have to have at least moderate pain in order for there to be a sensitive measure of pain‐relieving properties. The Cochrane Library has 35 reviews of oral analgesic interventions, with 38 different drugs, at various doses involving 45,000 participants in about 350 studies. This overview sought to bring all this information together, and to report the results for those drugs with reliable evidence about how well they work or any harm they may do in single oral doses.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

See all (28)...

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...