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Treats attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and binge eating disorder.

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Results: 10

Lisdexamfetamine dimesylate in the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: pharmacokinetics, efficacy and safety in children and adolescents

Bibliographic details: Mattos P.  Lisdexamfetamine dimesylate in the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: pharmacokinetics, efficacy and safety in children and adolescents. Revista de Psiquiatria Clinica 2014; 41(2): 34-39

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Systematic evidence synthesis of treatments for ADHD in children and adolescents: indirect treatment comparisons of lisdexamfetamine with methylphenidate and atomoxetine

OBJECTIVE: Systematically review and synthesize the clinical evidence of treatments for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) by indirectly comparing established treatments in the UK with a drug recently approved in Europe (lisdexamfetamine [LDX]).

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Exploratory meta-analysis on lisdexamfetamine versus placebo in adult ADHD

BACKGROUND: Recent studies have promised that lisdexamfetamine (LDX) is effective in the treatment of adults with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Treatment Options for ADHD in Children and Teens: A Review of Research for Parents and Caregivers

This summary discusses the different types of treatment for ADHD. It explains what research says about how each treatment improves symptoms and the risks involved with each treatment. It can help you talk with the doctor about ADHD and your child.

Comparative Effectiveness Review Summary Guides for Consumers [Internet] - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: June 26, 2012

Drug Class Review: Pharmacologic Treatments for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Final Update 4 Report [Internet]

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) affects children and adults and is treated with both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions. Multiple drugs are used to treat ADHD. This review evaluates the evidence on how these drugs compare to each other in benefits and harms.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: December 2011
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Guidelines and Recommendations for ADHD in Children and Adolescents [Internet]

Medications to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents are available in short- and long-acting formulations. Short-acting formulations of methylphenidate (e.g., Ritalin) and dextroamphetamine (e.g., Dexedrine) are generally given two to three times daily. They have been shown to be effective in reducing ADHD symptoms and provide dosing flexibility. Compared with short-acting formulations, long-acting formulations are given less frequently, but are more expensive and are not covered in all insurance plans. Recommendations about the use of long- or short-acting formulations are largely derived from expert opinion of best practices. Discourse on the use of long-acting formulations have centred on the following issues: compliance, social stigma, in-school dosing, and drug diversion.

Rapid Response Report: Summary of Current Evidence - Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health.

Version: October 2011
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Fatigue (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about fatigue, a condition marked by extreme tiredness and inability to function because of lack of energy, often seen as a complication of cancer or its treatment.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: August 28, 2014

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in Children and Adolescents

In response to a request from the public, a review was undertaken to evaluate the evidence regarding 1) the potential benefits and adverse effects associated with treatments for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in preschoolers, 2) the long-term effectiveness of interventions for ADHD in individuals 6 years of age and older, and 3) the variability of prevalence, diagnosis, and treatment associated with potential moderating factors. The systematic review included 223 studies published from January 1980 through May 2010. The full report, listing all studies, is available at www.effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/adhdtreatment.cfm. This summary is provided to inform discussions with patients and caregivers of options and to assist in decisionmaking along with consideration of a patient or caregiver’s values and preferences. However, reviews of evidence should not be construed to represent clinical recommendations or guidelines.

Comparative Effectiveness Review Summary Guides for Clinicians [Internet] - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: June 26, 2012

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Effectiveness of Treatment in At-Risk Preschoolers; Long-Term Effectiveness in All Ages; and Variability in Prevalence, Diagnosis, and Treatment [Internet]

(1) Compare effectiveness and adverse events of interventions (pharmacological, psychosocial, or behavioral, and the combination of pharmacological and psychosocial or behavioral interventions) for preschoolers at high risk for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); (2) compare long-term effectiveness and adverse events of interventions for ADHD among persons of all ages; and (3) describe how identification and treatment for ADHD vary by geography, time period, provider type, and sociodemographic characteristics, compared with endemic prevalence.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: October 2011
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Influence of stimulant and non-stimulant drug treatment on driving performance in patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: a systematic review

Adults with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), especially teenagers and young adults, show important car driving impairments, including risky driving, accidents, fines and suspension of driver׳s license. We systematically reviewed the efficacy of stimulant and non-stimulant drugs on driving performance of ADHD patients. We searched several databases for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published through March, 2013. Fifteen RCTs (the majority with crossover design) evaluated methylphenidate (MPH) immediate-release (MPH-IR), MPH osmotic-controlled oral system (MPH-OROS), MPH transdermal system (MTS), extended-release mixed amphetamine salts (MAS-XR); atomoxetine (ATX) and lisdexamfetamine (LDX). Methods varied widely; including simulators and/or cars and different courses and scenarios. Various outcomes of driving performance, including a 'composite' or 'overall' driving score were considered. In general, stimulants improved driving performance in ADHD patients (either in RCTs conducted in simulators and/or cars). MPH-OROS improved driving performance compared with MAS-XR, placebo, or no-drug conditions. Although MPH-OROS and MPH-IR produced similar improvements during the day, MPH-IR lost its efficacy in the evening. MAS-XR also improved driving performance, but worsened driving performance in the evening. MTS (one study) showed a positive effect, but drug compliance varied widely across patients. LDX had positive effect on driving (two studies with the same sample). Studies with ATX report conflicting results. Improvement was more consistent in teenagers and young adults. In general, treatment with psychostimulants or ATX in therapeutic dosages had no negative impact on driving performance of ADHD patients. To conclude, treatment with stimulants in therapeutic doses improves driving performance in ADHD patients, especially teenagers and young adults.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

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