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Injection: JE-VAX® prevents Japanese encephalitis (brain fever). This is a vaccine. This vaccine is no longer marketed in the United States.

Injection: Prevents Japanese encephalitis (brain swelling). This is a vaccine.

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Results: 4

Two doses of an inactivated vaccine can help prevent Japanese encephalitis disease for at least one year; however, comparisons with other widely used vaccines are not available

Japanese encephalitis is a viral disease of the central nervous system with general symptoms of headache, fever, vomiting, and diarrhoea. Most people recover within a week without further complications, but approximately 1 in 300 suffers additional and severe symptoms such as disorientation, seizures, paralysis, and coma. Around thirty per cent of the severe cases are fatal and most survivors are left with serious and often chronic disabilities such as mental impairment, limb paralysis, and blindness. In this review of randomized controlled trials, a commercially available inactivated vaccine given in two doses was shown to provide disease protection for at least one year after vaccination, but with some adverse events. Disease protection by two vaccines, widely used in China but presently commercially unavailable, has not been investigated in randomized controlled trials. Further research is needed on all currently used as well as newly developed vaccines.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Meta-analysis on serological effect of the primary vaccination for Japanese encephalitis of the literatures

OBJECTIVES: To summary and compare the different seroconversion rates after the primary vaccination for the Japanese encephalitis (JE), and to evaluate the serological effect of 3 kinds of JE vaccines.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2009

Antenatal Care: Routine Care for the Healthy Pregnant Woman

The original antenatal care guideline was published by NICE in 2003. Since then a number of important pieces of evidence have become available, particularly concerning gestational diabetes, haemoglobinopathy and ultrasound, so that the update was initiated. This update has also provided an opportunity to look at a number of aspects of antenatal care: the development of a method to assess women for whom additional care is necessary (the ‘antenatal assessment tool’), information giving to women, lifestyle (vitamin D supplementation, alcohol consumption), screening for the baby (use of ultrasound for gestational age assessment and screening for fetal abnormalities, methods for determining normal fetal growth, placenta praevia), and screening for the mother (haemoglobinopathy screening, gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia and preterm labour, chlamydia).

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: March 2008
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Atopic Eczema in Children: Management of Atopic Eczema in Children from Birth up to the Age of 12 Years

Atopic eczema (atopic dermatitis) is a chronic inflammatory itchy skin condition that develops in early childhood in the majority of cases. It is typically an episodic disease of exacerbation (flares, which may occur as frequently as two or three per month) and remissions, except for severe cases where it may be continuous. Certain patterns of atopic eczema are recognised. In infants, atopic eczema usually involves the face and extensor surfaces of the limbs and, while it may involve the trunk, the napkin area is usually spared. A few infants may exhibit a discoid pattern (circular patches). In older children flexural involvement predominates, as in adults. Diagnostic criteria are discussed in Chapter 3. As with other atopic conditions, such as asthma and allergic rhinitis (hay fever), atopic eczema often has a genetic component. In atopic eczema, inherited factors affect the development of the skin barrier, which can lead to exacerbation of the disease by a large number of trigger factors, including irritants and allergens. Many cases of atopic eczema clear or improve during childhood while others persist into adulthood, and some children who have atopic eczema `will go on to develop asthma and/or allergic rhinitis; this sequence of events is sometimes referred to as the ‘atopic march’. The epidemiology of atopic eczema is considered in Chapter 5, and the impact of the condition on children and their families/caregivers is considered in Sections 4.2 and 4.3.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: December 2007
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Systematic Reviews in PubMed

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