Home > Search Results

About - Ibuprofen

By mouth: Treats pain and fever. This medicine is an NSAID.

Injection: Treats fever and mild to severe pain. This medicine is an NSAID.

UsesSide effectsLatest evidence reviewsResearch summaries for consumersBrand names

Results: 21 to 40 of 273

Single dose oral ibuprofen plus codeine for acute postoperative pain in adults

Acute pain is often felt soon after injury. Most people who have surgery have moderate or severe pain afterwards. Painkillers are tested in people with pain, often following the removal of wisdom teeth. This pain is usually treated with painkillers taken by mouth. Results can be applied to other forms of acute pain.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Single dose oral ibuprofen plus oxycodone for acute postoperative pain

Acute pain is often felt soon after injury, and most people who have surgery will have pain of moderate or severe intensity without treatment for their pain. In most, though not all, circumstances, the pain can be treated with oral analgesics. Many oral analgesics are available, and this review is one of a series examining how effective each one is, at particular doses.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Single dose oral ibuprofen plus paracetamol (acetaminophen) for acute postoperative pain

Acute pain is often felt soon after injury, and most people who have surgery will have pain of moderate or severe intensity without treatment for their pain. In many, though not all, circumstances, the pain can be treated with oral analgesics. Many oral analgesics are available, and this review is one of a series examining how effective each one is, at particular doses.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Ibuprofen for the treatment of patent ductus arteriosus in preterm or low birth weight (or both) infants

A common complication for very preterm (premature) or very small babies is PDA. PDA is an open vascular channel between the lungs and the heart. It should close after birth, but sometimes remains open because of the baby's immature stage of development. PDA can lead to life‐threatening complications. The usual treatment for PDA has been indomethacin, a medicine that will successfully close the PDA in the majority of babies, but can cause serious side effects. Another option is the drug ibuprofen.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Ibuprofen versus paracetamol (acetaminophen) for pain relief after surgical removal of lower wisdom teeth

This review, carried out by the Cochrane Oral Health Group, seeks to compare the effectiveness of two commonly used painkillers, paracetamol and ibuprofen and the combination of both in a single tablet in the relief of pain following surgical removal of lower wisdom teeth.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

NSAID use and the risk of Parkinson's disease: systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies

The authors concluded that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) did not appear to modify the risk of Parkinson's disease, but ibuprofen users and male users of NSAIDs might experience slight risk reductions. Given the uncertainty around the methods used in the meta-analysis and the unknown quality of the included studies, the authors' conclusions may not be wholly reliable.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2009

Postoperative hemorrhage with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use after tonsillectomy: a meta-analysis

OBJECTIVE: To use standard meta-analysis techniques to determine the risk of postoperative hemorrhage associated with the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) after tonsillectomy.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2003

Association between NSAIDs use and breast cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis

This review concluded that the incidence of breast cancer in women was slightly reduced by the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Given substantial flaws in the methodology and analysis, and the presence of publication bias, this conclusion should be treated with extreme caution.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2009

Effectiveness and tolerability of pharmacologic and combined interventions for reducing injection pain during routine childhood immunizations: systematic review and meta-analyses

The authors concluded that topical local anaesthetics, sweet-tasting solutions, and combined interventions, including breastfeeding, appeared to reduce pain in children receiving vaccine injections and should be recommended for routine used in clinical practice. The authors’ conclusions were generally based on limited evidence and their reliability is unclear.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2009

Cardiovascular risk with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: systematic review of population-based controlled observational studies

The authors' reasonably cautious conclusion that naproxen and ibuprofen have the most favourable cardiovascular risk profiles is likely to be reliable, but should be weighted against other risks when making clinical decisions.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

Symptomatic treatment of migraine in children: a systematic review of medication trials

This review evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of symptomatic treatment of migraine in children. The authors' conclusion that acetaminophen, ibuprofen and nasal sumatriptan are all effective treatments for migraine episodes in children may be overstated, as most treatments have only been tested in one or two small trials and some of the analysis might not have been entirely appropriate.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2005

Fever in children: How can you lower a fever?

Medication is not necessarily needed to lower a fever, but treating the fever can help if the child is feeling extremely unwell or the fever is very high.But it is not always clear whether the symptoms are being caused by the fever or by an underlying illness. This means that lowering a fever will not always make someone feel better. There are basically two ways to lower a fever: using medication or applying a cooling treatment from outside the body.Some parents hope that they will be able to prevent febrile seizures with medication. There is no good research on whether fever-lowering medication can prevent febrile seizures.Many parents also try homeopathic products, including aconitum D12, red belladonna D12 or chamomilla D12. There are no scientific studies that show that any of these products are effective.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: December 18, 2013

Which medications can relieve migraine symptoms in children and teenagers?

The painkillers ibuprofen and acetaminophen (paracetamol) can relieve migraine attacks in children and teenagers, and only rarely cause side effects. Sumatriptan nasal spray is also effective for children over the age of 12, but it causes more side effects.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: April 3, 2012

Managing Osteoarthritis Pain With Medicines: A Review of the Research for Adults

This summary describes how to manage osteoarthritis pain by using a group of medicines called “analgesics” (pronounced an-al-JEEZ-iks). It also discusses the research about different types of analgesics. It talks about each medicine’s ability to relieve pain and the risks for serious side effects. It can help you talk with your doctor about managing your osteoarthritis pain. Other ways to manage pain from osteoarthritis, such as surgery, narcotic medicines, or steroids, are not included in this summary.

Comparative Effectiveness Review Summary Guides for Consumers [Internet] - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: February 15, 2012

Comparing NSAIDs

How do NSAIDs compare in reducing pain?

PubMed Clinical Q&A [Internet] - National Center for Biotechnology Information (US).

Version: May 1, 2011

Should you have your wisdom teeth pulled?

Some people believe that removing wisdom teeth is a waste of time if they are not causing any problems. Others think that the teeth will only cause trouble and have no real function anyway. There actually are good reasons for carefully considering whether you should have them removed.There are still many unanswered questions about wisdom teeth. This is one of the reasons why there are so many contradictory ideas about them. Some dentists recommend removing wisdom teeth no matter what – even if they are not causing any problems. Their reasoning is that the wisdom teeth will usually end up causing problems anyway and leave you with unattractive teeth. Another argument for removal is that we simply no longer need wisdom teeth.It has now become common to only recommend pulling wisdom teeth if they have already caused trouble or if problems are highly likely. Removing the teeth is quite unpleasant and may cause side effects. It has also not yet been proven whether pulling wisdom teeth that do not cause any problems has any possible health benefit. So it is a good idea to weigh the pros and cons of having an operation.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: June 18, 2014

Period pain: Can anti-inflammatory painkillers help?

Anti-inflammatory painkillers like diclofenac, ibuprofen and naproxen can help relieve severe period pain. These drugs occasionally cause adverse effects like headaches or stomach problems.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: September 24, 2013

Migraine information for children and teenagers

A migraine does not feel like an ordinary headache: your head hurts a lot and it can make you feel very ill. If it feels worse when you move and it feels like you simply cannot stand light or noise, then you probably have a migraine. You might still get other kinds of headaches that are not as bad too.Having migraines just once in a while is bad enough, but if you get them very often you might start feeling quite sick. It helps to remember that you are not alone – many young people get migraines that are so bad that they have to stay in. They end up missing out on school and doing things with friends. About 1 out of 10 teenagers sometimes have migraines.The good news is that there are many things that you can do to get fewer headaches and that can also help to make you feel better when you do have them. There is a very good chance that the migraines will even go away completely as you get older. Here you can read about what you can to keep from getting migraines quite so often and the best way to cope with the migraines you cannot avoid.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: March 30, 2012

Common colds: Relief for a stuffy nose, cough and sore throat

There are no treatments that fight cold viruses directly. Painkillers like ibuprofen and acetaminophen (paracetamol) can provide some relief from cold symptoms. So can nasal sprays, but many of the other treatments have either not been studied well enough or have no proven benefit.Colds are very common: Adults come down with a cold two to four times a year, and children have as many as six to ten colds a year. This is because colds can be caused by many different viruses, so an infection from one virus does not make you immune to other cold viruses.Colds usually go away on their own after about one to two weeks, but the symptoms – such as a runny or stuffy nose, cough and headache – can be bothersome. None of the currently available treatments can shorten the length of a cold. Antibiotics are not effective in the treatment of simple common colds because they only fight against bacteria. They can have side effects too, so they should only be used if a bacterial infection develops as a complication of the cold.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: April 23, 2014

Treating migraine with medication

Migraine attacks can be treated with different types of medication. Apart from commonly used painkillers, products for nausea or special migraine medication called triptans can also be used.Most people will use one or more medications to help them through an attack, especially if the migraine is very painful. Which medications people use depends on how serious the migraine attack is: A "basic" painkiller from a pharmacy might be enough to relieve moderate pain. But a stronger medication is needed for more severe migraines. People who have frequent migraines will often keep a variety of medications ready to be used if needed.The types of medication most commonly used by adults with migraines are:Painkillers from the group of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, the drug in "Aspirin"), ibuprofen, diclofenac or naproxen, and acetaminophen (paracetamol)Nausea medication like metoclopramide or domperidoneSpecial migraine medication (triptans) such as almotriptan or eletriptanAnother substance some migraine prescription drugs are based on  is ergotamine, which is derived from a grain fungus called ergot. For almost a century this was the only medicine specifically used to treat migraines. Nowadays, ergotamine is used less because it has more side effects than the triptans. In Germany, ergotamine products are no longer approved for preventing migraines as of 2014.Different types of medication serve different purposes. Some people mainly want relief as quickly as possible. They might go for a drug that acts faster, even if another might provide more relief but take longer to kick in. For others, maximum relief is the most important thing, even if it takes a little longer to start working. People whose migraines last for a long time might prefer drugs with a longer-lasting effect. Some people's options are limited, for example because they have heart disease and are therefore advised not to use triptans.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: June 20, 2012

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

See all (341)...

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...