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Drugs for discoid lupus erythematosus

Discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) is a severe form of skin inflammation which occurs particularly on sun‐exposed skin. It can cause permanent scarring but this can be prevented by early treatment. All forms of cutaneous lupus erythematosus are most common in women of childbearing age: this is particularly important because some treatments, including thalidomide and retinoids, cause birth defects. This review found that fluocinonide cream is more effective than hydrocortisone. Hydroxychloroquine and acitretin appear to work equally well, although acitretin has more frequent and severe adverse effects. Participants taking acitretin showed a small increase in serum triglyceride, not sufficient to require withdrawal of the drug. The acitretin trial was flawed by the inclusion of people with subacute cutaneous lupus and by the lack of a placebo arm. The trial does not provide evidence that either hydroxychloroquine or acitretin will be effective in people not responding to the other agent as it did not use a cross‐over design.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Psoriasis: Assessment and Management of Psoriasis

Psoriasis is a common, chronic disease, which for many people, is associated with profound functional, psychological and social morbidity and important comorbidities. Effective treatments are available. Some treatments are expensive; all require appropriate monitoring and some may only be accessed in specialist care settings. Evidence indicates that a substantial proportion of people with psoriasis are currently dissatisfied with their treatment.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: October 2012
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Pruritus (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about pruritus (itching of the skin) as a complication of cancer or its treatment. Approaches to the management and treatment of pruritus are discussed.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: May 5, 2016

Crohn's Disease: Management in Adults, Children and Young People

This guideline intends to show the place of both new and established treatments in the wider care pathway for Crohn's disease. This will be useful for clinicians and people with Crohn's disease because new drugs have been licensed for Crohn's disease in the last decade. The guideline also deals with those medications which are unlicensed for treatment of the condition, but which have been used in this way (off-label) for many years and their role is recognised in other NICE documents as well as the British National Formulary. They include azathioprine, mercaptopurine and methotrexate. The guideline aims to help improve the care offered to people with Crohn's disease and provide information about the clinical and cost effectiveness of potential care pathways. Management of Crohn's disease in specific populations (for example, in pregnancy) may require special consideration.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: October 10, 2012
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Atopic Eczema in Children: Management of Atopic Eczema in Children from Birth up to the Age of 12 Years

Atopic eczema (atopic dermatitis) is a chronic inflammatory itchy skin condition that develops in early childhood in the majority of cases. It is typically an episodic disease of exacerbation (flares, which may occur as frequently as two or three per month) and remissions, except for severe cases where it may be continuous. Certain patterns of atopic eczema are recognised. In infants, atopic eczema usually involves the face and extensor surfaces of the limbs and, while it may involve the trunk, the napkin area is usually spared. A few infants may exhibit a discoid pattern (circular patches). In older children flexural involvement predominates, as in adults. Diagnostic criteria are discussed in Chapter 3. As with other atopic conditions, such as asthma and allergic rhinitis (hay fever), atopic eczema often has a genetic component. In atopic eczema, inherited factors affect the development of the skin barrier, which can lead to exacerbation of the disease by a large number of trigger factors, including irritants and allergens. Many cases of atopic eczema clear or improve during childhood while others persist into adulthood, and some children who have atopic eczema `will go on to develop asthma and/or allergic rhinitis; this sequence of events is sometimes referred to as the ‘atopic march’. The epidemiology of atopic eczema is considered in Chapter 5, and the impact of the condition on children and their families/caregivers is considered in Sections 4.2 and 4.3.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: December 2007
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Bacterial Meningitis and Meningococcal Septicaemia: Management of Bacterial Meningitis and Meningococcal Septicaemia in Children and Young People Younger than 16 Years in Primary and Secondary Care

This guideline covers bacterial meningitis and meningococcal septicaemia, focusing on management of these conditions in children and young people aged younger than 16 years in primary and secondary care, and using evidence of direct relevance to these age groups where available.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: 2010
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Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

Expert-reviewed information summary about oral complications, such as mucositis and salivary gland dysfunction, that occur in cancer patients treated with chemotherapy or radiation therapy to the head and neck.

PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet] - National Cancer Institute (US).

Version: January 4, 2016

Etanercept, Infliximab and Adalimumab for the Treatment of Psoriatic Arthritis: A Systematic Review and Economic Evaluation

Etanercept, infliximab and adalimumab are licensed in the UK for the treatment of active and progressive psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in adults who have an inadequate response to standard treatment.

Health Technology Assessment - NIHR Journals Library.

Version: February 2011
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A systematic review of adverse effects associated with topical treatments for psoriasis

This review aimed to compare the rates of adverse events associated with the various, currently available topical treatments for psoriasis. Reviewing adverse events is not easy, but unfortunately this review was poorly conducted and reported and the narrative synthesis was very superficial. Given these limitations, the authors' conclusions cannot be relied upon.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2003

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

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