Home > Search Results
  • We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information

This medicine is a beta-blocker that treats high blood pressure and congestive heart failure (CHF), and reduces the risk of death after a heart attack.

UsesSide effectsLatest evidence reviewsResearch summaries for consumersBrand names

Results: 1 to 20 of 34

Carvedilol versus metoprolol for primary hypertension: a systematic review

Bibliographic details: Niu XW, Xu H, He SL, Chen D, Yan D, He ZY, Yao YL.  Carvedilol versus metoprolol for primary hypertension: a systematic review. Chinese Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine 2013; 13(8): 963-970

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Impact of carvedilol on the serum lipid profile

This review concluded that ?1-selective antagonists worsened the lipid profile compared to carvedilol and that it was unclear whether carvedilol independently made an improvement or had a neutral effect. The review had several methodological flaws and the authors' conclusions are not likely to be reliable.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2008

Meta-analysis comparing carvedilol versus metoprolol for the prevention of postoperative atrial fibrillation following coronary artery bypass grafting

A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the effects of carvedilol versus metoprolol on the incidence of postoperative atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting in randomized controlled trials. Ovid MEDLINE, PubMed, CENTRAL, and Excepta Medica (EMBASE) were searched up to March 2013 for suitable randomized controlled trials. Data were pooled using random-effects model for pairwise analyses. A total of 4 trials with 601 patients were included in this analysis. Pairwise analyses showed that compared with metoprolol, carvedilol significantly reduced the incidence of postoperative atrial fibrillation (odds ratio 0.50, 95% confidence interval 0.32 to 0.80). In conclusion, compared with metoprolol, carvedilol significantly reduces the incidence of postoperative atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Hemodynamic effect of carvedilol vs. propranolol in cirrhotic patients: systematic review and meta-analysis

BACKGROUND: Carvedilol appears to be more effective than propranolol in the treatment of portal hypertension in cirrhotic patients. Aim. To compare the effects of carvedilol vs. propranolol on systemic and splanchnic haemodynamics and to evaluate the adverse events associated with these treatments.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Carvedilol for prevention of atrial fibrillation after cardiac surgery: a meta-analysis

BACKGROUND: Postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF) remains the most common complication after cardiac surgery. Current guidelines recommend β-blockers to prevent POAF. Carvedilol is a non-selective β-adrenergic blocker with anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and multiple cationic channel blocking properties. These unique properties of carvedilol have generated interest in its use as a prophylaxis for POAF.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Systematic review with meta-analysis: the haemodynamic effects of carvedilol compared with propranolol for portal hypertension in cirrhosis

BACKGROUND: Propranolol is recommended for prophylaxis of variceal bleeding in cirrhosis. Carvedilol is a nonselective beta-blocker with a mild anti-alfa-1-adrenergic activity. Several studies have compared carvedilol and propranolol, yielding inconsistent results.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Meta-analysis of carvedilol versus beta 1 selective beta-blockers (atenolol, bisoprolol, metoprolol, and nebivolol).

Because carvedilol is a unique vasodilating β blocker (BB) exerting antioxidant activity and pleiotropic effects, it was theorized that it may confer more potent beneficial effects on cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and heart failure (HF) settings. A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed of randomized, controlled, direct-comparison trials that included adults receiving atenolol, bisoprolol, metoprolol, nebivolol, or carvedilol to evaluate the effects of carvedilol compared to other BBs on mortality, cardiovascular events, and hospital readmissions in the setting of AMI or systolic HF. Compared to β(1)-selective BBs used in HF (8 trials, n = 4,563), carvedilol significantly reduced all-cause mortality (risk ratio 0.85, 95% confidence interval 0.78 to 0.93, p = 0.0006). In 3 trials of patients with AMI (n = 644), carvedilol significantly reduced all-cause mortality by 45% (fixed-effects model: risk ratio 0.55, 95% confidence interval 0.32 to 0.94, p = 0.03, random-effects model: risk ratio 0.56, 95% confidence interval 0.26 to 1.12, p = 0.10), with no reduction in non-fatal MI (risk ratio 0.61, 95% confidence interval 0.31 to 1.22, p = 0.16). In conclusion, carvedilol, as compared against atenolol, bisoprolol, metoprolol and nebivolol in randomized direct comparison trials, significantly reduced all-cause mortality in systolic HF patients. Additionally, carvedilol significantly reduced all-cause mortality compared with β(1)-selective BBs in AMI patients using the fixed-effects model but not using the random-effects model.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Comparing Beta Blockers

How do beta blockers compare in hypertension?

PubMed Clinical Q&A [Internet] - National Center for Biotechnology Information (US).

Version: October 1, 2010

Drug Class Review: Agents for Overactive Bladder: Final Report Update 4 [Internet]

Overactive bladder is defined by the International Continence Society as a syndrome of urinary frequency and urgency, with or without urge incontinence, appearing in the absence of local pathological factors. Treatment of overactive bladder syndrome first requires a clear diagnosis. In patients with incontinence, multiple forms can be present and it is important to determine which form is dominant. Non-pharmacologic, non-surgical treatment consists of behavioral training (prompted voiding, bladder training, pelvic muscle rehabilitation), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, catheterization, and use of absorbent pads. Pharmacologic treatment for overactive bladder syndrome includes darifenacin, flavoxate hydrochloride, hyoscyamine, oxybutynin chloride, tolterodine tartrate, trospium chloride, scopolamine transdermal, and solifenacin succinate. The purpose of this systematic review is to compare the benefits and harms of drugs used to treat overactive bladder syndrome.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: March 2009
Show search results within this document

Evidence for the Reaffirmation of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation on Screening for High Blood Pressure [Internet]

High blood pressure is common, and screening is a well-established evidence-based standard of current medical practice.

Evidence Syntheses - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: December 2007
Show search results within this document

Dementia: A NICE-SCIE Guideline on Supporting People With Dementia and Their Carers in Health and Social Care

This guideline has been developed to advise on supporting people with dementia and their carers in health and social care. The guideline recommendations have been developed by a multidisciplinary team of health and social care professionals, a person with dementia, carers and guideline methodologists after careful consideration of the best available evidence. It is intended that the guideline will be useful to practitioners and service commissioners in providing and planning high-quality care for those with dementia while also emphasising the importance of the experience of care for people with dementia and carers.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (UK).

Version: 2007
Show search results within this document

Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation [Internet]

There are two generally accepted strategies for managing atrial fibrillation (AF): rate control and rhythm control. However, within each strategic approach there are a large number of potential pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapies, and the comparative safety and effectiveness of these therapies—both within and between strategies—are uncertain.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: June 2013
Show search results within this document

Type 2 Diabetes: National Clinical Guideline for Management in Primary and Secondary Care (Update)

Over 90% of people with diabetes have Type 2 diabetes. This is still perceived as the milder form, and while this may be true in some respects, such as the risk of ketoacidosis, the causation of Type 2 diabetes is more complex and the management is not necessarily easier. Type 2 diabetes can cause severe complications, affecting the eye, the nervous system and the kidney. The overall risk of cardiovascular disease is more than doubled, and life expectancy is reduced by an average 7 years. In 2002, NICE published a suite of five guidelines dealing with different aspects of the care of Type 2 diabetes. The rising prevalence of the disease, and the range of complications which can arise, reinforce the importance of up-to-date guidance and accordingly NICE have asked the National Collaborating Centre for Chronic Conditions (NCC-CC) to produce this guideline, amalgamating and updating the previously published work.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Chronic Conditions (UK).

Version: 2008
Show search results within this document

Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors (ACEIs), Angiotensin II Receptor Antagonists (ARBs), and Direct Renin Inhibitors for Treating Essential Hypertension: An Update [Internet]

A 2007 comparative effectiveness review (CER) evaluated the long-term benefits and harms of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) versus angiotensin II receptor blockers/antagonists (ARBs) for treating essential hypertension in adults. Since then, significant additional research has been published comparing these agents, and direct renin inhibitors (DRIs) have been introduced to the market. We sought to update 2007 CER on ACEIs versus ARBs and expand this to include comparisons with DRIs.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: June 2011
Show search results within this document

Drug Class Review: Direct Renin Inhibitors, Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors, and Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers: Final Report [Internet]

The renin-angiotensin system is a complex biologic system between the heart, brain, blood vessels, and kidneys that leads to the production of biologically active agents, including angiotensin I and II and aldosterone, which act together to impact a variety of bodily functions including blood vessel tone, sodium balance, and glomerular filtration pressure. The multiple and varied effects of these agents allows the renin-angiotensin system to play a wide role in the pathology of hypertension, cardiovascular health, and renal function. Our ability to begin to intervene upon the complex cycle of hormone and other biochemical agent production within the renin-angiotensin system began with the advent of the first orally active ACE-I (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor), captopril, in 1981. AIIRAs (angiotensin II receptor blockers) were developed as an alternative to ACE-I, and block the interaction between angiotensin II and the angiotensin receptor. Losartan, the first commercially available AIIRA, was approved for clinical use in 1995. The goal of this report is to compare the effectiveness and harms between aliskiren and placebo and between AIIRAs and ACEIs in the treatment of diagnosed coronary heart disease, hypertension, left ventricular dysfunction, heart failure, nondiabetic chronic kidney disease, or diabetic nephropathy.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: January 2010
Show search results within this document

Pharmacological interventions for treating heart failure in patients with Chagas cardiomyopathy

Named in honor of the Brazilian physician Carlos Chagas, Chagas disease is caused by the Trypanosoma cruzi parasite which needs humans for the start of its life cycle. It is common in Latin and Central America and leads to Chagas cardiomyopathy (heart muscle disease), and is an important cause of heart failure. The number of people infected with Chagas disease has been estimated to be about 10 to 12 million worldwide, and around 20% to 30% of individuals infected with Trypanosoma cruzi will develop symptomatic heart disease at some point during their lives.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Beta-blockers in heart failure: benefits of beta-blockers according to varying male proportions of study patients

This review concluded that in people with heart failure, the three commonly used beta-blockers significantly reduced mortality. Greater benefits were observed in studies with higher proportions of men. Metoprolol was superior to carvedilol or bisoprolol in reducing sudden death. There were questions about some methods of the review and quality of included data, conclusions should be treated with caution.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

Drug Class Review: Beta Adrenergic Blockers: Final Report Update 4 [Internet]

Beta blockers inhibit the chronotropic, inotropic, and vasoconstrictor responses to the catecholamines, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. Beta blockers differ in their duration of effect (3 hours to 22 hours), the types of beta receptors they block (β1-selective or β1/β2-nonselective), whether they are simultaneously capable of exerting low level heart rate increases (intrinsic sympathomimetic activity [ISA]), and in whether they provide additional blood vessel dilation effects by also blocking alpha-1 receptors. All beta blockers are approved for the treatment of hypertension. Other US Food and Drug Administration-approved uses are specific to each beta blocker and include stable and unstable angina, atrial arrhythmias, bleeding esophageal varices, coronary artery disease, asymptomatic and symptomatic heart failure, migraine, and secondary prevention of post-myocardial infarction. The objective of this review was to evaluate the comparative effectiveness and harms of beta blockers in adult patients with hypertension, angina, coronary artery bypass graft, recent myocardial infarction, heart failure, atrial arrhythmia, migraine or bleeding esophageal varices.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: July 2009
Show search results within this document

Beta-blocker benefit according to severity of heart failure

This review concluded that the degree of benefit from treatment with beta-blockers is similar regardless of the severity of heart failure (except for severe end-stage heart failure). The conclusions appear to follow from the evidence presented, but it is difficult to comment on the reliability of the conclusions because of lack of detail about the review methods and included studies.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2003

Medical options to fight mortality in end-stage renal disease: a review of the literature

Many therapeutic strategies for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients have failed to exhibit survival improvement in large-scale randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The current review gives an overview on the medical strategies for treatment of ESRD patients that have previously been tested in RCTs with mortality reduction as pre-specified study endpoint. We identified 19 RCTs with the following therapeutic strategies: haematocrit increase by erythropoietin (n = 1), growth hormone application (n = 1), lipid-lowering by statins (n = 3), renin-angiotensin system blockage (n = 4), β-receptor blockage (n = 1), homocysteine lowering (n = 5), application of anti-oxidative substances (n = 2), omega-3-fatty-acid supplementation (n = 1) and calcium-free phosphate binders (n = 1). While several of these studies were able to demonstrate reductions in hard cardiovascular endpoints such as myocardial infarction, survival improvement in ESRD patients was demonstrated in only three studies. The substances tested in these three trials were telmisartan, candesartan and carvedilol. In summary, most pharmaceutical mono-interventions failed to reduce mortality in ESRD patients, i.e. a multi-morbid population. Apart from the issues relating to future trial design, this raises the question of whether we need multi-faceted interventions to improve this dismal situation. Until then, nephrologists are left with little evidence and lots of opinions.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

See all (82)...

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...