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About - Caffeine

By mouth: Keeps you mentally alert.

Oral route, Parenteral route: Caffeine belongs to the group of medicines called central nervous system (CNS) stimulants.

UsesSide effectsLatest evidence reviewsResearch summaries for consumersBrand names

Results: 1 to 20 of 105

Effect of green tea catechins with or without caffeine on anthropometric measures: a systematic review and meta-analysis

BACKGROUND: Green tea catechins (GTCs) with or without caffeine have been studied in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) for their effect on anthropometric measures and have yielded conflicting results.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2010

A risk-benefit assessment of paracetamol (acetaminophen) combined with caffeine

OBJECTIVE: To determine the risk: benefit of paracetamol combined with caffeine in the short-term management of acute pain conditions.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2010

Effects of restricted caffeine intake by mother on fetal, neonatal and pregnancy outcome

Caffeine is a stimulant found in tea, coffee, cola, chocolate and some over‐the‐counter medicines. Conflicting results found in the literature make it difficult for health professionals to advise pregnant women about avoiding caffeine during pregnancy. Clearance of caffeine from the mother's blood slows down during pregnancy. Some authors of observational studies have concluded that caffeine intake is harmful to the fetus, causing growth restriction, reduced birthweight, preterm birth or stillbirth. The newborn could also have withdrawal symptoms if the mother has a high intake of caffeine (more than eight cups of coffee per day).

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Effects of green tea catechins with or without caffeine on glycemic control in adults: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

BACKGROUND: The effect of green tea catechins (GTCs) with or without caffeine on glycemic control is controversial.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Prophylactic caffeine to prevent postoperative apnoea following general anaesthesia in preterm infants

Caffeine may be able to prevent postoperative apnoea and bradycardia in preterm babies. Growing babies who were born too early (preterm) and who undergo general anaesthetic for surgery may have complications, including episodes of apnoea (pauses in breathing), cyanosis (from lack of oxygen in the blood), and bradycardia (slow heartbeat). Caffeine, a methylxanthine drug, is thought to stimulate breathing, and so possibly prevent apnoea and subsequent problems. The review found some evidence that caffeine given at the time of surgery reduces apnoea, bradycardia, and cyanosis after anaesthetic, but the importance of this is unclear.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Theophylline, aminophylline, caffeine and analogues for acute ischaemic stroke

Theophylline and related drugs, which can enlarge brain blood vessels, are of no apparent benefit in the early treatment of strokes caused by blood clots. Most strokes are caused by a blood clot which then reduces blood flow in the affected part of the brain. Without an adequate blood supply, the brain quickly suffers damage which is often permanent. Drugs which can improve brain blood flow might reduce damage and improve outcome after stroke. Theophylline and related drugs have the ability to alter brain blood flow. This systematic review assesses whether this type of drug improves outcome after stroke. The review identified two small trials, neither of which found any benefit. The limited amount of data mean that there is no evidence at present to suggest that theophylline and related drugs should be used in acute stroke.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Caffeine versus theophylline for apnea in preterm infants

There is some evidence that caffeine is as effective as theophylline in the short‐term for reducing apnea in premature babies, is better tolerated and is easier to give.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Caffeine as an analgesic adjuvant for acute pain in adults

Caffeine is commonly used as a component in pain‐relieving medicines available from pharmacies without a prescription. An adjuvant is something that is added to a medicine to make it work better. This review examined whether caffeine improves the pain‐relieving effects of such medicines; studies evaluated focused on several pain conditions, including headache, post‐dental pain, postoperative pain following childbirth, and menstrual period pain. The review found that adding caffeine, at a dose equivalent to a mug of coffee to a standard dose of common analgesics such as paracetamol or ibuprofen increases the number of people with acute pain who will experience a good level of pain relief by 5% to 10%.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

The effect of caffeine in people with asthma

Caffeine is found in coffee, tea, cola drinks and cocoa. Caffeine is a drug that is very similar to theophylline. Theophylline is a bronchodilator drug that is taken to open up the airways in the lungs and therefore relieve the symptoms of asthma, such as wheezing, coughing and breathlessness. Scientists are interested in finding out whether caffeine has the same effect on the lungs as theophylline.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Caffeine for preventing injuries and errors in shift workers

Sleepiness leads to a deterioration in performance and is associated with an increased risk of error and injury. Shift work is an major cause of sleepiness as it requires workers to be awake at times which are different to those dictated by their 'body clock'. This in turn can compromise the safety of themselves and of others ‐ sleepiness is a risk factor for events such as traffic crashes, occupational injuries and medical errors.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

Options for Treating Restless Legs Syndrome: A Review of the Research for Adults

This summary will cover: What RLS is Treatment options for RLS What researchers have found about RLS treatments

Comparative Effectiveness Review Summary Guides for Consumers [Internet] - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: August 30, 2013

Faecal Incontinence: The Management of Faecal Incontinence in Adults

For many people faecal incontinence is the result of a complex interplay of contributing factors, many of which can co-exist. Some may be relatively simple to reverse.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Acute Care (UK).

Version: 2007
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Preventing Alzheimer's Disease and Cognitive Decline

To assess whether previous research on purported risk or protective factors for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and cognitive decline is of sufficient strength to warrant specific recommendations for behavioral, lifestyle, or pharmaceutical interventions/modifications targeted to these endpoints.

Evidence Reports/Technology Assessments - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: April 2010
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Lactose Intolerance and Health

We systematically reviewed evidence to determine lactose intolerance (LI) prevalence, bone health after dairy-exclusion diets, tolerable dose of lactose in subjects with diagnosed LI, and management.

Evidence Reports/Technology Assessments - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: February 2010
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Drug Class Review: Newer Drugs for Insomnia: Final Report Update 2 [Internet]

Insomnia is a serious health problem that affects millions of people. Population surveys have estimated the prevalence of insomnia to be about 30% to 50% of the general population. About three-fourths of people who have trouble sleeping say that the problem is "occasional," averaging about 6 nights per month, with one-fourth having frequent or chronic insomnia, averaging about 16 nights per month. Individuals with insomnia most often report a combination of difficulty falling asleep and intermittent wakefulness during sleep. Treatment of insomnia involves behavioral changes, such as minimizing habits that interfere with sleep (for example, drinking coffee or engaging in stressful activities in the evening), and pharmacotherapy with sedating antidepressants (for example, trazodone), sedating antihistamines, anticholinergics, benzodiazepines, or nonbenzodiazepine hypnotics. The benzodiazepines and the newer sedative hypnotics zolpidem, zaleplon, zopiclone, and eszopiclone work through gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors. Ramelteon, a hypnotic approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in July 2005, is a selective melatonin receptor (MT1 and MT2) agonist. New nonbenzodiazepine drugs have been sought for multiple reasons, including reduction of the risk of tolerance, dependence, and abuse associated with benzodiazepines. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the comparative evidence on benefits and harms of these medications in people with insomnia to help policymakers and clinicians make informed choices about the use of newer drugs for insomnia.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: October 2008
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Drug Class Review: Atypical Antipsychotic Drugs: Final Update 3 Report [Internet]

Atypical antipsychotic agents are used to treat the symptoms of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The purpose of this review is to help policy makers and clinicians make informed choices about their use. Given the prominent role of drug therapy in psychiatric disease, our goal is to summarize comparative data on efficacy, effectiveness, tolerability, and safety. Ten atypical antipsychotics are currently available in the United States and Canada. Clozapine, the prototypic atypical antipsychotic, was introduced in 1989. Since then, 9 other atypical antipsychotics have been brought to market: risperidone (1993), risperidone long-acting injection (2003), olanzapine (1996), quetiapine (1997), ziprasidone (2001), aripiprazole (2002), extended-release paliperidone (2006), asenapine (2009), iloperidone (2009), and paliperidone long-acting injection (2009).

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: July 2010
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Off-Label Use of Atypical Antipsychotics: An Update [Internet]

Antipsychotic medications are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treatment of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and for some drugs, depression. We performed a systematic review on the efficacy and safety of atypical antipsychotic drugs for use in conditions lacking FDA approval.

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: September 2011
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Enabling Medication Management Through Health Information Technology

The objective of the report was to review the evidence on the impact of health information technology (IT) on all phases of the medication management process (prescribing and ordering, order communication, dispensing, administration and monitoring as well as education and reconciliation), to identify the gaps in the literature and to make recommendations for future research.

Evidence Reports/Technology Assessments - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: April 2011
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Screening for Osteoporosis: Systematic Review to Update the 2002 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation [Internet]

Osteoporosis and related fractures are common in older individuals and lead to premature mortality, loss of function and independence, reduced quality of life, and high costs. Despite its importance, osteoporosis is under detected in the United States. This review updates evidence since the 2002 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation on osteoporosis screening.

Evidence Syntheses - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: July 2010
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The effects of green tea on weight loss and weight maintenance: a meta-analysis

The authors concluded that catechins or a epigallocatechin gallate-caffeine mixture (green tea) had a small positive effect on weight loss and weight maintenance. Limitations in the review methodology mean that the overall effect size estimate was unlikely to be reliable and the conclusions should be treated with caution.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2009

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

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