Home > Search Results

By mouth: Treats minor aches and pain and reduces fever.

Injection: Relieves pain and reduces fever.

Rectal: Treats minor pain and reduces fever in children or in people who cannot take acetaminophen by mouth.

UsesSide effectsLatest evidence reviewsResearch summaries for consumersBrand names

Results: 21 to 40 of 341

Acetaminophen and ibuprofen for prevention of adverse reactions associated with childhood immunization

This review investigated use of acetaminophen and ibuprofen for prevention of adverse reactions associated with childhood immunisation. The authors concluded that acetaminophen and ibuprofen may prevent adverse events in young infants receiving diphtheria-tetanus toxoids-whole pertussis vaccine. No benefits were demonstrated for the diphtheria-tetanusoxides acellular pertussis vaccine. The conclusions may not be reliable due to methodological limitations.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2007

Restricting paracetamol in the United Kingdom to reduce poisoning: a systematic review

This review assessed the effectiveness of the UK 1998 regulations to restrict sales of paracetamol to reduce poisoning. The authors concluded that the available studies suggested that the 1998 regulations may have been associated with reduced admissions to liver units and hospitals and reduced paracetamol sales, but firm conclusions could not be drawn and further research is needed. These conclusions are appropriately cautious given the evidence presented.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2004

Effectiveness of oral vs rectal acetaminophen: a meta-analysis

The authors concluded that oral and rectal acetaminophen had comparable effects on temperature reduction. Given the unclear quality of the included trials and the small numbers of participants included for analysis, the reliability of the authors' conclusions is unclear.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2008

Codeine-acetaminophen versus nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the treatment of post-abdominal surgery pain: a systematic review of randomized trials

This review compared the efficacy and safety of NSAIDs with acetaminophen plus codeine for pain control after post-laporotomy pain. The authors concluded that NSAIDs appeared to have an overall better risk-benefit ratio than acetaminophen plus codeine for postpartum pain. Given that review scoping decisions and study selection were not fully explained, the reliability of the conclusion is unclear.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2009

Systematic review of studies comparing combined treatment with paracetamol and ibuprofen, with either drug alone

The author concluded there was little evidence of benefit or harm from paracetamol and ibuprofen combined compared to using each alone; there was no evidence of increased toxicity. Due to the relatively small size and number of studies, imperfections in the conduct of the review, uncertain study quality and limited comparability of the studies, reliability of the conclusions is unclear.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

Systematic review and meta-analysis of the clinical safety and tolerability of ibuprofen compared with paracetamol in paediatric pain and fever

This review concluded that ibuprofen, paracetamol and placebo for paediatric pain and fever had comparable profiles for gastrointestinal symptoms, asthma and renal adverse effects. This was generally a well-conducted review and the authors’ conclusions are likely to be reliable, although (as the authors acknowledged) some caution may be merited based on comparisons with placebo from a few small studies.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2009

Upper gastrointestinal complications among users of paracetamol

The authors concluded that the use of paracetamol (acetaminophen) at commonly prescribed dosages is associated with small or no increased risk for upper gastrointestinal complications. The conclusions were in line with the evidence presented. However, the inclusion of only observational studies and lack of an assessment of validity make it difficult to be certain of the reliability of the authors' conclusions.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2006

Effects of acetaminophen on morphine side-effects and consumption after major surgery: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

The authors concluded that the addition of acetaminophen to intravenous patient-controlled analgesia with morphine reduces the need for morphine in patients undergoing major surgery, but does not affect morphine-related side-effects. The authors' conclusions appear to be supported by the data presented, but limited reporting of review methods means it is not possible to confirm their reliability.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2005

A systematic review of paracetamol for non-specific low back pain

This review assessed the effectiveness of paracetamol for the treatment of pain and disability in patients with non-specific low back pain, but there was insufficient evidence to evaluate their efficacy. This was a well-conducted review and the authors acknowledged limitations with the included trials, such as low quality and poor reporting. Their conclusions are likely to be reliable.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2008

Acetaminophen use and the risk of asthma in children and adults: a systematic review and metaanalysis

The authors concluded that there was an increased risk of asthma in adults and children who used acetaminophen. Further research was needed. In light of unclear quality of the included studies and limited study information, the authors' conclusions should be treated with caution.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2009

NSAIDs vs acetaminophen in knee and hip osteoarthritis: a systematic review regarding heterogeneity influencing the outcomes

This review concluded that none of the variables evaluated had a clinically relevant influence on the relative effectiveness of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs versus paracetamol (acetaminophen) for knee and hips osteoarthritis. Future trials should present the results of patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis separately. The authors’ conclusions reflect the evidence presented and the lack of higher quality data.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

Efficacy and safety of ibuprofen and acetaminophen in children and adults: a meta-analysis and qualitative review

The review found that ibuprofen was similarly or more efficacious than acetaminophen for treatment of pain and fever in adults and children and was equally safe. The authors' cautious conclusions reflected the evidence presented, but shortcomings in the review process, a lack of quality assessment and substantial clinical differences made the reliability of the conclusions unclear.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2010

Evidence on interventions for paracetamol (acetaminophen) overdose patients is weak

Poisoning with paracetamol (acetaminophen) is a common cause of hepatic injury. The evidence for all interventions for paracetamol overdose is weak. Activated charcoal, gastric lavage, and ipecacuanha are able to reduce absorption of paracetamol if started within one to two hours of paracetamol ingestion, but the clinical benefit is unclear. Activated charcoal seems to be the best choice if the patient is compliant. N‐acetylcysteine seems superior to no intervention and other antidotes (dimercaprol, cysteamine) and should be administered to patients at significant risk of hepatic damage. However, N‐acetylcysteine superiority to methionine is unclear. Liver transplantation will clearly benefit patients with irreversible hepatic failure. However, identifying such patients early is problematic and the long‐term outcomes in this group of patients have not been reported. Other interventions have not shown any clinical benefit for paracetamol overdose.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Single dose oxycodone and oxycodone plus paracetamol (also known as acetaminophen) for analgesia in adults with acute postoperative pain

This review update assessed evidence from 2641 participants in 20 randomised, double blind, placebo‐controlled clinical trials of oxycodone, with or without paracetamol, in adults with moderate to severe acute postoperative pain. Oral oxycodone 10 mg plus paracetamol 650 mg provided effective analgesia. About half of those treated experienced at least half pain relief over 4 to 6 hours, and the effects lasting up to 10 hours. Higher doses gave more effect. Associated adverse events (predominantly nausea, vomiting, dizziness and somnolence) were more frequent with oxycodone or oxycodone plus paracetamol than with placebo, but studies of this type are of limited use for studying adverse effects. Limited information about oxycodone on its own suggests that it provided analgesia at doses greater than 5 mg, and that addition of paracetamol made it more effective.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

The role of paracetamol and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in addition to WHO Step III opioids in the control of pain in advanced cancer: a systematic review of the literature

BACKGROUND: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and paracetamol are used widely in the management of mild to moderate cancer pain and are frequently combined with opioids in the treatment of moderate to severe pain.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

Acetaminophen (also called paracetamol) for the common cold in adults

The common cold is the most frequent viral infection of the upper respiratory tract. Adults in the US experience two to four colds per year. The symptoms of the common cold usually include nasal obstruction, headache, sore throat, sneezing, cough, malaise and nasal discharge. There is no effective therapy for the common cold and most medications are symptomatic. Acetaminophen (also called paracetamol) is widely used as the major ingredient in combination medications for the common cold. However, there is little information about the effectiveness and safety of this treatment. We reviewed studies to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of acetaminophen in the treatment of the common cold in adults. The evidence is current to February 2013.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

A comparison of the efficacy and safety of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs versus acetaminophen in symptom relief for the common cold: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trial studies

BACKGROUND: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetaminophen are widely used for common cold symptom relief. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the efficacy and safety of acetaminophen and NSAIDs in common cold symptom relief using meta-analysis of randomized controlled trial.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Single dose oral paracetamol (acetaminophen) for postoperative pain relief in adults

Pain is commonly experienced after surgical procedures, and is not always well controlled. This review assessed data from fifty‐one studies and found that paracetamol provided effective pain relief for about half of participants experiencing moderate to severe pain after an operation, including dental surgery for a period of about four hours. There were no clear differences between doses of paracetamol typically used. These single dose studies did not associate paracetamol with any serious side effects.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Single doses of intravenous formulations of paracetamol (acetaminophen) to reduce pain after surgery in adults and children

Pain is commonly experienced after surgical procedures and multiple medications are routinely used to control it. This review assessed data from 36 studies of participants (3896 in total) experiencing moderate to severe pain after various operations. It found that intravenous (IV) formulations of paracetamol (either IV propacetamol or IV paracetamol) provided pain relief for a period of four hours for about 40% of participants. Direct comparisons with other pain killers, such as morphine and anti‐inflammatories, did not show any difference in effectiveness, although this may have been due to the small numbers of participants in these comparisons (i.e. the studies were not statistically powered to show a difference). IV propacetamol and IV paracetamol produced few side effects. However, participants receiving IV propacetamol complained of pain at the site their medication was infused at more often than those receiving placebo or IV paracetamol.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Dosing and antipyretic efficacy of oral acetaminophen in children

BACKGROUND: A standardized approach to dosing acetaminophen in pediatric populations was published in 1983. That review proposed specific weight-related dosing for infants and children weighing 6 through 95 lb and an age-based schedule for children aged <4 months through 11 years. Subsequent clinical studies evaluating these and alternative doses of acetaminophen supported the recommended 10-15-mg/kg dose.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

See all (407)...

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...