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Lowers high cholesterol and triglyceride levels. May reduce the risk of heart attack, stroke, and blood vessel problems. This medicine is a statin.

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Results: 1 to 20 of 68

Effectiveness of rosuvastatin in reducing LDL-C and target LDL-C goal attainment in real-world clinical practice

This review concluded that compared with other statins there was strong and consistent evidence to demonstrate the effectiveness of rosuvastatin in reducing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and LDL-C goals in usual care settings. These conclusions should be interpreted with caution given a possibility of publication bias, insufficient data and limited methodological rigour of the included studies.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2009

Approximate equivalent rosuvastatin doses for temporary statin interchange programs

OBJECTIVE: To estimate approximate doses of rosuvastatin equivalent to the other hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) for a temporary substitution program.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2004

Effects of rosuvastatin and atorvastatin on renal function: meta-analysis

BACKGROUND: Several clinical trials have reported inconsistent findings for the effects of rosuvastatin (RSV) and atorvastatin (ATV) on renal function. The aim of this meta-analysis was to investigate the effects of these 2 statins on glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and proteinuria respectively, and determine which is better.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

Effects of rosuvastatin versus atorvastatin on small dense low-density lipoprotein: a meta-analysis of randomized trials

In addition to their high-intensity effects on the reduction in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels, rosuvastatin and atorvastatin would be expected to also reduce small dense LDL (sdLDL) levels. To determine which reduces sdLDL levels more, we performed the first meta-analysis and meta-regression of randomized head-to-head trials of rosuvastatin versus atorvastatin therapy. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched through April 2012. Eligible studies were prospective, randomized controlled trials of rosuvastatin versus atorvastatin therapy reporting final sdLDL (directly measured or calculated) levels as an outcome. For each study, data regarding final sdLDL levels in both the rosuvastatin and atorvastatin groups were used to generate mean differences (MD) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI). Meta-regression analysis was performed to determine whether the effects of rosuvastatin therapy were modulated by the prespecified factors. Of 159 potentially relevant articles screened initially, 28 reports of randomized trials enrolling a total of 7802 patients were included. Pooled analysis suggested a significant reduction in final sdLDL levels among patients randomized to rosuvastatin versus atorvastatin therapy (MD, -1.56 mg/dl; 95 % CI, -2.30 to -0.83 mg/dl; P < 0.0001). The meta-regression coefficients were statistically significant for the baseline LDL/sdLDL level and the difference in LDL changes between the two groups. In conclusion, rosuvastatin rather than atorvastatin therapy is likely more effective in reduction of sdLDL levels. It should be further investigated whether the reduction in sdLDL levels implies overt clinical benefits of rosuvastatin over atorvastatin.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

A meta-analysis of randomized head-to-head trials for effects of rosuvastatin versus atorvastatin on apolipoprotein profiles

To determine which statin will better improve the apolipoprotein (Apo) profiles (ApoA-I levels, ApoB levels, and ApoB/A-I ratios), we performed a meta-analysis of randomized head-to-head trials of rosuvastatin versus atorvastatin therapy. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched through December 2012 using Web-based search engines (PubMed and OVID). The search terms included "apolipoprotein," "rosuvastatin," "atorvastatin," "randomized," "randomly," and "randomization." Of 42 potentially relevant studies initially screened, 25 reports of randomized trials enrolling 14,283 patients were included. A pooled analysis for the percentage of changes in ApoA-I demonstrated a benefit of rosuvastatin versus atorvastatin in the comparison of all rosuvastatin/atorvastatin dose ratios (mean difference 2.97%, 3.39%, 5.77%, and 6.25%). For the percentage of changes in ApoB, a benefit was seen for rosuvastatin versus atorvastatin in the 1/1 (-6.06%) and 1/2 dose ratio (-1.80%). However, a benefit was seen for atorvastatin versus rosuvastatin in the 1/4 (2.38%) and 1/8 dose ratio (6.59%). The pooled analysis for the percentage of changes in the Apo B/A-I ratios demonstrated a benefit for rosuvastatin versus atorvastatin in the 1/1 (-7.22%) and 1/2 dose ratio (-3.51%), with no difference in the 1/4 dose ratio. In contrast, a benefit was seen for atorvastatin versus rosuvastatin in the 1/8 dose ratio (4.03%). In conclusion, rosuvastatin might increase Apo A-I levels at all dose ratios and decrease ApoB levels and ApoB/A-I ratios in the 1/1 and 1/2 dose ratio versus atorvastatin. Only higher dose atorvastatin appeared to be more effective for the reduction in ApoB levels (1/4 and 1/8 dose ratio) and Apo B/A-I ratios (1/8 dose ratio).

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Effects of atorvastatin and rosuvastatin on renal function: a meta-analysis

BACKGROUND: Atorvastatin (A) and rosuvastatin (R) are highly effective and widely used statins. However, conflicting results have been reported regarding their renal effects. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of A and R on glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and new onset proteinuria in patients at high cardiovascular risk.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

[Impact on the carotid intima-medial thickness and safety of rosuvastatin in Chinese patients with carotid atherosclerosis: a meta-analysis]

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of rosuvastatin in Chinese patients with carotid atherosclerosis.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Comparison of sequential rosuvastatin doses in hypercholesterolaemia: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

This review provided evidence for improved efficacy, as assessed by surrogate markers, in treating patients with hypercholesterolaemia with each sequential titration of rosuvastatin and a generally consistent tolerability profile across the dose range. The authors' conclusions reflect the evidence presented, but the lack of validity assessment and lack of reporting of some data made the reliability of the conclusions uncertain.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2010

Comparing Statins and Combination Drugs

How do statins and combination drugs compare in lowering "bad" cholesterol (LDL-c)?

PubMed Clinical Q&A [Internet] - National Center for Biotechnology Information (US).

Version: November 1, 2010

Lipid Modification: Cardiovascular Risk Assessment and the Modification of Blood Lipids for the Primary and Secondary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease [Internet]

The scope for this guideline was limited to the identification and assessment of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and to the assessment and modification of lipids in people at risk of CVD or people with known cardiovascular disease. The guideline development group wishes to make it clear that lipid modification should take place as part of a programme of risk reduction and also include attention to the management of all other known risk factors.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Primary Care (UK).

Version: May 2008
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Dementia: A NICE-SCIE Guideline on Supporting People With Dementia and Their Carers in Health and Social Care

This guideline has been developed to advise on supporting people with dementia and their carers in health and social care. The guideline recommendations have been developed by a multidisciplinary team of health and social care professionals, a person with dementia, carers and guideline methodologists after careful consideration of the best available evidence. It is intended that the guideline will be useful to practitioners and service commissioners in providing and planning high-quality care for those with dementia while also emphasising the importance of the experience of care for people with dementia and carers.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (UK).

Version: 2007
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Type 2 Diabetes: National Clinical Guideline for Management in Primary and Secondary Care (Update)

Over 90% of people with diabetes have Type 2 diabetes. This is still perceived as the milder form, and while this may be true in some respects, such as the risk of ketoacidosis, the causation of Type 2 diabetes is more complex and the management is not necessarily easier. Type 2 diabetes can cause severe complications, affecting the eye, the nervous system and the kidney. The overall risk of cardiovascular disease is more than doubled, and life expectancy is reduced by an average 7 years. In 2002, NICE published a suite of five guidelines dealing with different aspects of the care of Type 2 diabetes. The rising prevalence of the disease, and the range of complications which can arise, reinforce the importance of up-to-date guidance and accordingly NICE have asked the National Collaborating Centre for Chronic Conditions (NCC-CC) to produce this guideline, amalgamating and updating the previously published work.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Chronic Conditions (UK).

Version: 2008
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Statins for preventing blood clot formation within veins

Venous thrombosis or thromboembolism (VTE) is a condition in which a blood clot (thrombus) forms in a vein and causes a blockage. The blockage most commonly occurs in the ‘deep veins’ of the lower legs, thighs, or pelvis, and is called deep vein thrombosis (DVT). If part or the entire clot breaks away and is carried through the blood (venous) system it is called an embolism. Should the clot reach the lungs, it is known as a pulmonary embolism (PE) and is life threatening. VTE affects about 3,705,000 people worldwide annually and is one of the most preventable causes of hospital deaths. Statins are well known cholesterol‐lowering drugs that are used in heart disease. They have other protective effects including anti‐clotting properties and may be effective in the prevention of VTE. Our review, based on one large randomised controlled trial (RCT) involving 17,802 participants, investigated rosuvastatin (a type of statin) for the prevention of VTE. The participants were age 50 years or older for men and 60 years or older for women, with no history of cardiovascular disease, a low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol level of less than 3.4 mmol per litre) and a high‐sensitivity C‐reactive protein level of 2.0 mg per litre or more. Metabolic syndrome was present in 41.7% of participants. We showed that rosuvastatin could reduce the incidence of VTE, particularly VTE that occurred in the presence of cancer, recent trauma, hospitalisation, or surgery, and DVT. It did not reduce the number of cases of PE or deaths after VTE. The risk of fatal and non‐fatal heart attacks combined and fatal and non‐fatal strokes combined were reduced. Rosuvastatin was not associated with serious adverse events. More RCTs of statins (including rosuvastatin) are needed to evaluate the efficacy of statins in the prevention of VTE.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Effect of statins on HDL-C: a complex process unrelated to changes in LDL-C - analysis of the VOYAGER database

The relationship between statin-induced increases in HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration and statin-induced decreases in LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) is unknown. The effects of different statins on HDL-C levels, relationships between changes in HDL-C and changes in LDL-C, and predictors of statin-induced increases in HDL-C have been investigated in an individual patient meta-analysis of 32,258 dyslipidemic patients included in 37 randomized studies using rosuvastatin, atorvastatin, and simvastatin. The HDL-C raising ability of rosuvastatin, and simvastatin was comparable, with both being superior to atorvastatin. Increases in HDL-C were positively related to statin dose with rosuvastatin and simvastatin but inversely related to dose with atorvastatin. There was no apparent relationship between reduction in LDL-C and increase in HDL-C, whether analyzed overall for all statins (correlation coefficient = 0.005) or for each statin individually. Percentage increase in apolipoprotein A-I was virtually identical to that of HDL-C at all doses of the three statins. Baseline concentrations of HDL-C and triglyceride (TG) and presence of diabetes were strong, independent predictors of statin-induced elevations of HDL-C. Statins vary in their HDL-C raising ability. The HDL-C increase achieved by all three statins was independent of LDL-C decrease. However, baseline HDL-C and TGs and the presence of diabetes were predictors of statin-induced increases in HDL-C.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2010

Meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials of statins versus placebo in patients with heart failure

This review concluded that statins were safe, improved heart function (left ventricular ejection fraction), and decreased hospitalisation for worsening heart failure. Two trials contributed 95% of the participants in the review; both evaluated rosuvastatin, and neither reported any significant benefit over placebo. Given the influence of small, poor quality RCTs on the overall pooled results, the authors' conclusion seem overstated.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2009

Comparative benefits of statins in the primary and secondary prevention of major coronary events and all-cause mortality: a network meta-analysis of placebo-controlled and active-comparator trials

BACKGROUND: The extent to which individual statins vary in terms of clinical outcomes across all populations, in addition to secondary and primary prevention has not been studied extensively in meta-analyses.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Dose-comparative effects of different statins on serum lipid levels: a network meta-analysis of 256,827 individuals in 181 randomized controlled trials

AIMS: The extent to which individual statins vary in terms of their impact on serum lipid levels has been studied mainly on the basis of placebo-controlled trials. Our objective was to review and quantify the dose-comparative effects of different statins on serum lipid levels using both placebo- and active-comparator trials.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Differing effect of statins on insulin sensitivity in non-diabetics: a systematic review and meta-analysis

The authors concluded that statins did not produce a class effect in terms of insulin sensitivity in non-diabetic patients and there were differences in effect between individual statins. Although there was a possibility of publication bias, this was a largely well-conducted review and the authors' conclusions seem likely to be reliable.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2010

Early high-dose lipid-lowering therapy to avoid cardiac events: a systematic review and economic evaluation

The aim of this research was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of high-dose statins (atorvastatin 80 mg/day, rosuvastatin 40 mg/day and simvastatin 80 mg/day) versus simvastatin 40 mg/day in individuals with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) who have experienced a recent ACS event.

NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme: Executive Summaries - NIHR Evaluation, Trials and Studies Coordinating Centre (UK).

Version: 2009

Adverse events associated with individual statin treatments for cardiovascular disease: an indirect comparison meta-analysis

The use of statin therapy for cardiovascular disease was associated with a relatively low risk of adverse events. High risk of bias within the studies, high clinical and methodological heterogeneity between the studies, and a discrepancy between the initial outcomes stated and those actually reported suggest that the authors' conclusions and recommendations may not be reliable.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

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