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About - Ranitidine

By mouth: Treats and prevents heartburn with acid indigestion. Also treats stomach ulcers, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and conditions that cause your stomach to make too much acid (such as Zollinger-Ellison syndrome). This medicine is a histamine H2-blocker.

Injection: Treats stomach ulcers and conditions that cause your stomach to make too much acid (such as Zollinger-Ellison syndrome). This medicine is given to people who cannot take Zantac® by mouth.

UsesSide effectsLatest evidence reviewsResearch summaries for consumersBrand names

Results: 1 to 20 of 41

The effect of ranitidine versus proton pump inhibitors on gastric secretions: a meta-analysis of randomised control trials

The authors concluded that pre-medication of elective surgery patients with ranitidine (histamine-2 blocker) was more effective than proton-pump inhibitors in reducing the volume of gastric secretions and reducing gastric acidity. The conclusions reflected the evidence presented, but should be interpreted with caution given the potential for publication bias, reviewer error and bias, and the limitations of small sample sizes.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2009

Comparing Proton Pump Inhibitors

How do proton pump inhibitors compare in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)?

PubMed Clinical Q&A [Internet] - National Center for Biotechnology Information (US).

Version: October 1, 2010

Arthritis: What can prevent stomach ulcers caused by painkillers and who needs such protection?

Regular use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as diclofenac or ibuprofen can cause ulcers in the stomach and intestine. But the risk can be significantly reduced by taking particular medications.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: April 26, 2012

Treatment Options for GERD or Acid Reflux Disease: A Review of the Research for Adults

This summary describes GERD and explains research about types of treatment. It also talks about what research has found about the benefits and risks of each treatment. It can help you talk with your doctor about GERD.

Comparative Effectiveness Review Summary Guides for Consumers [Internet] - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: September 23, 2011

Drug Class Review: Proton Pump Inhibitors: Final Report Update 5 [Internet]

Proton pump inhibitors decrease secretion of gastric acid. They act by blocking the last enzyme in the system that actively transports acid from gastric parietal cells into the gastrointestinal lumen, hydrogen–potassium adenosine triphosphatase, also known as the proton pump. Omeprazole, the first drug in this class, was introduced in 1989. Since then, 4 other proton pump inhibitors have been introduced: lansoprazole (1995), rabeprazole (1999), pantoprazole (2000), and esomeprazole (2001). In 2003 omeprazole became available over-the-counter in the United States. The purpose of this review is to compare the benefits and harms of different PPIs.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: May 2009
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Dyspepsia: Managing Dyspepsia in Adults in Primary Care

This national guideline provides evidence-based recommendations for the primary care management of dyspepsia symptoms and underlying causes in adults. It was developed for use by the National Health Service in England and Wales. NHS healthcare professionals, patient representatives and researchers developed this guideline, incorporating comments received from referees and from an extensive national stakeholder consultation.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - North of England Dyspepsia Guideline Development Group (UK).

Version: August 1, 2004
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Depression in Adults with a Chronic Physical Health Problem: Treatment and Management

This clinical guideline was commissioned by NICE and developed by the National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health. It sets out clear, evidenceand consensus-based recommendations for healthcare staff on how to treat and manage depression in adults with a chronic physical health problem.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (UK).

Version: 2010
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Gastro-oesophageal reflux. Part 2: medical treatment

INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND: Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is a chronic disease characterised by retrograde movement of stomach contents into the oesophagus. It causes heartburn and oesophagitis and adversely affects quality of life. If left untreated it can lead to oesophageal stricture and carcinoma. The prevalence in Western countries is 30%. This paper presents a comparative review of the effectiveness of Omeprazole with Ranitidine for treatment of GORD.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Efficacy of proton-pump inhibitors in children with gastroesophageal reflux disease: a systematic review

INTRODUCTION: Use of proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in children has increased enormously. However, effectiveness and safety of PPIs for pediatric GERD are under debate.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

Systematic review: the efficacy of intermittent and on-demand therapy with histamine H2-receptor antagonists or proton pump inhibitors for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease patients

AIM: To perform a systematic review on the efficacy of intermittent and on-demand therapy with either histamine H2-receptor antagonists or proton pump inhibitors for patients with erosive oesophagitis or symptomatic heartburn.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2005

Histamine‐blocking drugs for hives

Urticaria is a common skin disease characterised by itching weals or hives that can appear anywhere on the surface of the skin. Weals may be pinpoint in size or several inches in diameter. Most sufferers experience hives continuously or intermittently for less than six weeks, but they may last longer (when they are then called 'chronic'). Urticaria can also be accompanied by angioedema (swelling of a deeper layer of the skin). There are several varieties of urticaria, but the most common forms are acute urticaria and chronic urticaria. Common causes of acute urticaria are infections and adverse reactions to medications and foods, whereas in chronic urticaria the cause is often unknown. Intense itching is common, and it can lead to disturbed sleep and even depression, having a serious impact on a person's quality of life. As the face and other exposed body parts can be affected, hives and angioedema can prove embarrassing for the individual.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Stress ulcer, gastritis, and gastrointestinal bleeding prophylaxis in critically ill pediatric patients: a systematic review

OBJECTIVE: To identify and evaluate the quality of evidence supporting prophylactic use of treatments for stress ulcers and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Stress ulcers, erosions of the stomach and duodenum, and upper gastrointestinal bleeding are well-known complications of critical illness in children admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2010

Meta-analyses: does long-term PPI use increase the risk of gastric premalignant lesions?

BACKGROUND: Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are the most effective agents available for reducing acid secretion. They are used for medical treatment of various acid-related disorders. PPIs are used extensively and for extended periods of time in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). A troublesome issue regarding maintenance therapy has been the propensity of PPI-treated patients to develop chronic atrophic gastritis while on therapy that could theoretically lead to an increased incidence of gastric cancer. In addition, animal studies have raised concern for development of enterochromaffin-like cell hyperplasia and carcinoid tumors in the stomachs of mice receiving high dose PPIs. Current literature does not provide a clear-cut conclusion on the subject and the reports are sometimes contradictory. Therefore, this study is a systematic review of the available literature to address the safety of long-term PPI use and its relation to the development of malignant/premalignant gastric lesions.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Treatment of esophageal (noncardiac) chest pain: an expert review

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Chest pain is a common and frightening symptom. Once cardiac disease has been excluded, an esophageal source is most likely. Pathophysiologically, gastroesophageal reflux disease, esophageal dysmotility, esophageal hypersensitivity, and anxiety disorders have been implicated. However, treatment remains a challenge. Here we examined the efficacy and safety of various commonly used modalities for treatment of esophageal (noncardiac) chest pain (ECP) and provided evidence-based recommendations.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Do patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia respond differently to Helicobacter pylori eradication treatments from those with peptic ulcer disease: a systematic review

This review assessed whether patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia respond differently to Helicobacter pylori eradication treatment than those with peptic ulcer disease. No convincing evidence for a difference in eradication rate was identified. Despite uncertainty about the quality of the included studies, this was generally a good-quality systematic review and the authors' conclusions are likely to be reliable.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2005

Interventions for heartburn in pregnancy

Heartburn affects more than two‐thirds of women in late pregnancy. Usually it is not serious, but symptoms can be very distressing to pregnant women. There are many different interventions to relieve heartburn including advice on diet and lifestyle and a range of medicines (many of which are available over the counter without prescription). The review authors identified three randomised controlled trials including a total of 286 women focusing on three different heartburn medications. While the results of the individual trials were positive (women described some relief from symptoms), overall it was concluded that there is little information on the safety or effectiveness of drugs used to treat heartburn in pregnancy. More information is needed on this common and distressing condition.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Nitrofuran-based regimens for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection

This review assessed furazolidone-based and nitrofurantoin-based regimens for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection and concluded that furazolidone-based primary triple therapies were less efficient than standard therapies. Furazolidone-based primary quadruple therapies were more efficient than furazolidone-based primary triple therapies. Given uncertainty over parts of the review process and study quality, the findings should be interpreted with caution.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2007

Routine prophylactic drugs in normal labour for reducing gastric aspiration and its effects

No good evidence for drugs, like antacids, in normal labour to reduce the small chance of inhaling some stomach contents if general anaesthesia is required.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

Histamine type 2 receptor antagonists as adjuvant treatment for resected colorectal cancer

Colorectal cancer (bowel cancer) is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in the world. Surgery is the primary curative treatment for those with early stage disease. However, a number of patients relapse after primary surgery, presumably due to cancer cells that have spread undetected to other parts of the body. In general, once colorectal cancer has spread it is no longer curable. Hence, adjuvant treatments are given around the time of surgery to eliminate any remnant cells to improve a patient's chance of cure.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Interventions at caesarean section for reducing the risk of lung damage from inhaling stomach contents during anaesthesia

Thirty‐two studies were included in this review. However, only 22 studies, involving 2658 women, provided data for analysis, looking at interventions given prior to caesarean section for reducing the risk of aspiration. There were several different drugs and drug combinations being considered and the studies were generally of poor or questionable quality. Antacids (like sodium citrate), H2 receptor antagonists (like ranitidine), proton pump antagonists (like omeprazole), all reduced the acidity of the stomach contents. An antacid plus an H2 receptor antagonist also reduced acidity. In theory, a combination like this, where the antacid acts quickly and the H2 receptor antagonists takes a little longer, should protect at periods of greatest risk, i.e. the beginning and end of the procedure (i.e. intubation and extubation). More research is needed to identify the best combination of drugs and to check for possible adverse effects.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

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