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Results: 1 to 20 of 112

Oral, vaginal and sublingual misoprostol for induction of labor

Bibliographic details: Bartusevicius A, Barcaite E, Nadisauskiene R.  Oral, vaginal and sublingual misoprostol for induction of labor. International Journal of Gynecological Cancer 2005; 91(1): 2-9

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2005

Efficacy and safety of misoprostol for intrauterine insemination: a systematic review

Bibliographic details: Song R, Cai X, Wu TX.  Efficacy and safety of misoprostol for intrauterine insemination: a systematic review. Chinese Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine 2010; 10(9): 1072-1078

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2010

Effectiveness and safety of misoprostol versus gemeprost before the first and second-trimester induction of abortion operation: a systematic review

Bibliographic details: Jiang Q Q, Zou Y, Wu T X.  Effectiveness and safety of misoprostol versus gemeprost before the first and second-trimester induction of abortion operation: a systematic review. Chinese Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine 2005; 5(12): 921-928

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2005

Evaluation of the effectiveness of mifepristone concomitant with misoprostol for medical abortion

Bibliographic details: Zou Y, Li Y P, Gan C P, Wu L, Tong L, Liang Y, Li T, Tang Y, Mei L, Yang J, Liu Y W.  Evaluation of the effectiveness of mifepristone concomitant with misoprostol for medical abortion. Chinese Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine 2005; 5(8): 619-631

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2005

Misoprostol prior to hysteroscopy in premenopausal and post-menopausal women: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Bibliographic details: Polyzos NP, Zavos A, Valachis A, Dragamestianos C, Blockeel C, Stoop D, Papanikolaou EG, Tournaye H, Devroey P, Messinis IE.  Misoprostol prior to hysteroscopy in premenopausal and post-menopausal women: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Human Reproduction Update 2012; 18(4): 393-404 Available from: http://humupd.oxfordjournals.org/content/18/4/393.abstract

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

Labor induction with intravaginal misoprostol compared with the dinoprostone vaginal insert: a systematic review and metaanalysis

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to review randomized trials that compared the efficacy of the dinoprostone 10-mg controlled-release vaginal insert with that of vaginally administered misoprostol tablets in cervical ripening and labor induction.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2010

Uterine rupture in second-trimester misoprostol-induced abortion after cesarean delivery: a systematic review

This review concluded that the risk of uterine rupture was similar in women with and without a prior caesarean delivery who used misoprostol (prostaglandin analogue) for second-trimester abortion. The authors' conclusions appeared to reflect the limited evidence available but, given the limitations with the review process and the uncertain quality of the included studies, they should be interpreted with caution.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2009

Misoprostol use during the third stage of labor

This review assessed the effectiveness of misoprostol (in terms of reducing blood loss) compared with placebo and other uterotonic drugs. The authors concluded that misoprostol was less effective than oxytocin and other uterotonics. The evidence presented appears to support the conclusions, although the reliability of the conclusions may be weakened by the presence of statistical heterogeneity for most outcomes.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2003

[Cervical ripening with misoprostol with a live fetus]

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of misoprostol for cervical ripening or induction of labor at term.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Misoprostol in preventing postpartum hemorrhage: a meta-analysis

This review assessed the effectiveness of misoprostol for the prevention of postpartum haemorrhage. The author concluded that conventional uterotonic drugs should not be used to set the lowest accepted level of effectiveness in settings where they are unsuitable. Whilst this was a reasonably well-conducted systematic review, the author's conclusions are not directly based on the findings and, therefore, cannot be verified.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2006

Flexible mifepristone and misoprostol administration interval for first-trimester medical termination

BACKGROUND: The administration interval between mifepristone and misoprostol is usually about 36-48 h, which might affect a woman's choice of method of termination. Unwanted outcomes such as uterine bleeding, painful cramps and psychosocial issues which may occur during this long interval can be altered by a shorter administration interval. A shorter interval will be cost-effective as it saves both women's and clinician's time and other resources. If the waiting time interval between therapeutic interventions could be reduced without compromising efficacy, it will potentially improve compliance, patient acceptability and quality of care.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2010

Risk of fever after misoprostol for the prevention of postpartum hemorrhage: a meta-analysis

OBJECTIVE: To estimate the incidence and risk of misoprostol-induced fever with different doses and routes when used for the prevention of postpartum hemorrhage.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

Efficacy and safety of intravaginal misoprostol versus intracervical dinoprostone for labor induction at term: a systematic review and meta-analysis

AIM: Recent studies suggest that misoprostol may be more effective than dinoprostone in pregnant women with unfavorable cervix. The objective here is to investigate and compare the efficacy and safety of intravaginal misoprostol and intracervical dinoprostone for labor induction, including incidence of cesarean section, vaginal delivery rate within 24 h, uterine hyperstimulation, tachysystole, oxytocin augmentation, neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admissions, and Apgar score of less than 7 at 1 and 5 min.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Misoprostol to reduce intraoperative and postoperative hemorrhage during cesarean delivery: a systematic review and metaanalysis

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of prophylactic misoprostol use at cesarean delivery for reducing intraoperative and postoperative hemorrhage.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Rethinking WHO guidance: review of evidence for misoprostol use in the prevention of postpartum haemorrhage

This article describes and critically appraises clinical trials assessing misoprostol effectiveness in preventing primary postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) in home and community settings in low- and middle-income countries. Of 172 identified studies of misoprostol use in labour only six fulfilled the inclusion criteria. All trials used 600 μg misoprostol in the intervention arm; three assessed misoprostol alongside components of active management of the third-stage labour (AMTSL), two used expectant management of labour and one allowed birth attendants to choose management practice. The three AMTSL studies showed no significant differences in PPH incidence or referral to higher centres and only one study showed significant decrease in severe PPH using misoprostol. One expectant management study and the choice of management by birth attendants study found significant decreases in PPH incidence with misoprostol. All studies showed significantly increased risk of shivering with misoprostol. Studies were biased by use of alternative uterotonics in the control arm, confounding management practices, and subjective assessment and, with one exception, exclusion of high-risk women. PPH incidence fell in both the control and intervention groups in both the landmark papers that informed the World Health Organization (WHO) decision to admit misoprostol to the Essential Medicines List. This suggests factors other than misoprostol use are crucial. Current evidence does not support misoprostol use in home and community settings in low- and middle-income countries for PPH prevention. WHO should rethink its recent decision to include misoprostol on the Essential Medicines List.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

Misoprostol for prevention and treatment of postpartum haemorrhage: a systematic review

Background: Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is a leading cause of maternal mortality especially in the developing world. Misoprostol, a highly effective drug is highly effective in inducing uterine contractions and has been proposed as a low-cost, easy-to-use intervention for PPH.Objective: This study assessed evidence of the effectiveness of misoprostol for the prevention and treatment of PPH.Method: Databases searched included MEDLINE, PUBMED, CINHAL, Google Scholar, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and EMBASE. Reference lists and conference proceedings were also searched for more studies. Three studies included in the meta-analysis were limited to randomised controlled trials (RCT). Two reviewers independently screened all articles for methodological quality using a standardised instrument adapted from the Cochrane Collaboration website. Data were entered in Review Manager 5.1 software for analysis.Results: Three trials (n = 2346) compared misoprostol to a placebo. Misoprostol was shown not to be effective in reducing PPH (risk ratios [RR] 0.65; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.40-1.06). Only one trial reported on the need for a blood transfusion (RR 0.14; 95% CI 0.02-1.15). Shivering (RR 2.75; 95% CI 2.26-3.34) and pyrexia (RR 5.34; 95% CI 2.86-9.96) were significantly more common with misoprostol than with a placebo.Conclusion: The use of misoprostol was not associated with any significant reduction in the incidence of PPH. Therefore, in order to verify the efficacious use of misoprostol in the treatment of PPH, specialised investigations of its dose and routes of administration for clinically significant effects and acceptable side effects are warranted.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Foley catheter versus vaginal misoprostol: randomized controlled trial (PROBAAT-M study) and systematic review and meta-analysis of literature

Objectives To assess effectiveness and safety of Foley catheter versus vaginal misoprostol for term induction of labor. Study Design This trial randomly allocated women with singleton term pregnancy to 30-mL Foley catheter or 25-μg vaginal misoprostol tablets. Primary outcome was cesarean delivery rate. Secondary outcomes were maternal and neonatal morbidity and time to birth. Additionally, a systematic review was conducted. Results Fifty-six women were allocated to Foley catheter, 64 to vaginal misoprostol tablets. Cesarean delivery rates did not differ significantly (25% Foley versus 17% misoprostol; relative risk [RR] 1.46, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.72 to 2.94), with more cesarean deliveries due to failure to progress in the Foley group (14% versus 3%; RR 4.57, 95% CI 1.01 to 20.64). Maternal and neonatal outcomes were comparable. Time from induction to birth was longer in the Foley catheter group (36 hours versus 25 hours; p < 0.001). Meta-analysis showed no difference in cesarean delivery rate and reduced vaginal instrumental deliveries and hyperstimulation in the Foley catheter group. Other outcomes were not different. Conclusion Our trial and meta-analysis showed no difference in cesarean delivery rates and less hyperstimulation with fetal heart rate changes and vaginal instrumental deliveries when using Foley catheter, thereby supporting potential advantages of the Foley catheter over misoprostol as ripening agent.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized studies comparing misoprostol versus placebo for cervical ripening prior to hysteroscopy

OBJECTIVE(S): Hysteroscopy is an effective method for examining the uterine cavity but has some limitations, including the occasional need for cervical dilatation. Misoprostol is routinely used for cervical dilatation in various procedures but has not gained wide acceptance for use before hysteroscopy.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

Prenatal exposure to misoprostol and congenital anomalies: systematic review and meta-analysis

This review concluded that prenatal exposure to misoprostol is associated with an increased risk of Mobius sequence and terminal transverse limb defects. This appears to be a well-conducted review and the authors' conclusions appear to be supported by the findings. However, the poor quality of the limited number of included studies suggests that the findings should be interpreted with caution.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2006

Misoprostol in operative hysteroscopy: a systematic review and meta-analysis

OBJECTIVE: To estimate the benefits and harms of misoprostol use for cervical dilation in patients undergoing operative hysteroscopy.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

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