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About - Miconazole

Between cheek and gum: Treats fungal (yeast) infections in the mouth and throat (oral thrush). This is an antifungal.

On the skin: Treats fungal infections.

Topical route: Miconazole belongs to the group of medicines called antifungals.

Vaginal: Treats vaginal yeast infections. This medicine is an antifungal.

UsesSide effectsLatest evidence reviewsResearch summaries for consumersBrand names

Results: 20

Miconazole versus miconazole plus living preparation of lactobacillus for vulvovaginal candidiasis: a systematic review

Bibliographic details: Cui L, Wang C, Fu J, Xie LX, Hu LN.  Miconazole versus miconazole plus living preparation of lactobacillus for vulvovaginal candidiasis: a systematic review. Chinese Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine 2010; 10(1): 89-93

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2010

Prevention of fungal infections in patients with cancer with antifungal drugs

Cancer patients receiving chemotherapy or a bone marrow transplant are at risk of fungal infections. These can be life‐threatening, especially when they spread throughout the body. Those patients with low white cell counts (neutropenia) are particularly at risk. Antifungal drugs are often given as a routine preventive measure, or when people who are at risk have a fever. The review found that intravenous amphotericin B could reduce the number of deaths. Three of the drugs, amphotericin B, fluconazole and itraconazole, reduced fungal infections.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Topical anti‐inflammatory agents for seborrhoeic dermatitis of the face or scalp

Seborrhoeic dermatitis is an inflammation of the skin that most often affects areas of the body that have a lot of sebaceous glands. These include the skin of the scalp; face; chest; and flexure areas such as the armpits, groin, and abdominal folds. The most typical symptoms of seborrhoeic dermatitis are scaling of the skin and reddish patches. Seborrhoeic dermatitis is fairly common: one to three in 100 people have seborrhoeic dermatitis. The disease is more common in men than in women. Anti‐inflammatory, antifungal, and antikeratolytic treatments can be used to treat seborrhoeic dermatitis. The treatment does not cure the disease but relieves the symptoms.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

How effective are athlete's foot treatments?

Athlete's foot is very common and usually does not cause any serious problems. But affected skin can crack, and be itchy and unattractive. The fungus can spread to the nails, and on rare occasions to other areas of skin. The infection can usually be treated effectively with creams, gels or sprays.Athlete's foot fungi grow particularly well in the areas between our toes. It is often moist and warm there, and the skin on our feet is also a good breeding ground for fungus. Topical treatment will usually clear up the infection within a few weeks. Tablets only have to be taken in exceptional cases.Good hygiene is also important so that other people do not become infected and to prevent the infection from returning. That includes regularly changing socks, towels and bedding and washing them at over 60 degrees Celsius.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: January 14, 2015

Antifungal treatments applied to the skin to treat seborrhoeic dermatitis

Seborrhoeic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin condition found throughout the world, with rashes with varying degrees of redness, scaling and itching. It affects people of both sexes but is more common among men. The disease usually starts after puberty and can lead to personal discomfort and cosmetic concerns when rashes occur at prominent skin sites. Drugs that act against moulds, also called antifungal agents, have been commonly used on their own or in combination.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Prophylactic oral/topical non‐absorbed antifungal agents to prevent invasive fungal infection in very low birth weight infants

Fungi such as candida (the organism that causes thrush) can cause severe infections in very low birth weight infants (birth weight < 1.5 kg). These infections are often difficult to diagnose and frequently cause death or disability. Therefore, it may be appropriate to attempt to prevent such infections by giving very low birth weight infants antifungal drugs as a routine part of their care. This review assessed specifically the effect of giving infants antifungal drugs that reduce skin and gut carriage of fungi to minimise the chances of a severe infection developing. The trials that were identified suggested that this treatment might reduce severe infection rates but there was no evidence that death rates were reduced. Larger and higher quality trials are needed to resolve this uncertainty.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Antenatal Care: Routine Care for the Healthy Pregnant Woman

The original antenatal care guideline was published by NICE in 2003. Since then a number of important pieces of evidence have become available, particularly concerning gestational diabetes, haemoglobinopathy and ultrasound, so that the update was initiated. This update has also provided an opportunity to look at a number of aspects of antenatal care: the development of a method to assess women for whom additional care is necessary (the ‘antenatal assessment tool’), information giving to women, lifestyle (vitamin D supplementation, alcohol consumption), screening for the baby (use of ultrasound for gestational age assessment and screening for fetal abnormalities, methods for determining normal fetal growth, placenta praevia), and screening for the mother (haemoglobinopathy screening, gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia and preterm labour, chlamydia).

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health (UK).

Version: March 2008
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Medical treatments for fungal infection of the cornea (clear front part of the eye)

We identified 12 randomised controlled trials that included 981 people; the evidence is current up to March 2015. The trials were mainly conducted in India.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Postnatal Care: Routine Postnatal Care of Women and Their Babies [Internet]

This guideline has been written within a conceptual framework which places the woman and her baby at the centre of care, appreciating that all postnatal care should be delivered in partnership with the woman and should be individualised to meet the needs of each mother-infant dyad. The guideline aims to identify the essential ‘core care’ which every woman and her baby should receive, as appropriate to their needs, during the first 6–8 weeks after birth, based upon the best evidence available.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Primary Care (UK).

Version: July 2006
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Safe and Effective Anticoagulation in the Outpatient Setting: A Systematic Review of the Evidence [Internet]

The primary objectives of this systematic review were to: 1. Determine whether specialized anticoagulation clinics (ACC) are more effective and safer than care in non-specialized clinics (e.g., primary care clinics, physician offices) for management of long- term anticoagulation in adults; 2. Determine whether patient self testing (PST), either alone or in combination with patient self management (PSM), is more effective and safer than standard care; and 3. Identify the risk factors for serious bleeding in patients on chronic anticoagulant therapy.

Evidence-based Synthesis Program - Department of Veterans Affairs (US).

Version: February 2011
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Venous Thromboembolism: Reducing the Risk of Venous Thromboembolism (Deep Vein Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism) in Patients Admitted to Hospital

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a term used to include the formation of a blood clot (a thrombus) in a vein which may dislodge from its site of origin to travel in the blood, a phenomenon called embolism. A thrombus most commonly occurs in the deep veins of the legs; this is called deep vein thrombosis. A dislodged thrombus that travels to the lungs is known as a pulmonary embolism.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre – Acute and Chronic Conditions (UK).

Version: 2010
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Drug Class Review: Alzheimer's Drugs: Final Report [Internet]

Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common adult form of dementia. Currently available pharmacologic therapies, including cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists, are considered symptomatic treatments based on their ability to slow the clinical progression of symptoms across cognitive, behavioral, and functional domains. The purpose of this review is to help policy makers and clinicians make informed choices about the use of ChEIs and memantine in the treatment of AD. We compare the efficacy, effectiveness, and safety of donepezil, galantamine, rivastigmine, tacrine, and memantine in patients with mild to severe AD.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: June 2006
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Boric acid for recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis: the clinical evidence

BACKGROUND: Recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) remains a challenge to manage in clinical practice. Recent epidemiologic studies indicate that non-albicans Candida spp. are more resistant to conventional antifungal treatment with azoles and are considered as causative pathogens of vulvovaginal candidiasis.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

Effectiveness of different central venous catheters for catheter-related infections: a network meta-analysis

This review compared the effectiveness of various catheters for preventing catheter-related infection and whether some led to fewer infections. The hesitant conclusion was that rifampicin-based impregnated catheters seemed to be better for prevention of catheter-related infections compared with other catheters. Overall, poor study quality and clinical heterogeneity mean that the conclusion should be interpreted with caution.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2010

Behandlung der Tinea pedis vom interdigitalen Typ: Systematischer Review [Treatment of interdigital tinea pedis: a systematic review]

The review investigated the efficacy of treatments for interdigital tinea pedis. The authors concluded that allylamines, especially terbinafine, provide superior treatment in comparison with azoles. The conclusion appears reliable.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2003

Comparable efficacy and safety of various topical formulations of terbinafine in tinea pedis irrespective of the treatment regimen: results of a meta-analysis

The authors concluded that, compared with placebo or an alternative antifungal, terbinafine in any formulation is well tolerated and effective as a cure for athlete's foot. Despite several limitations of the review, such as no discussion of study quality and some pooling of very diverse studies, the authors' conclusions appear reasonable.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2007

Rifampicin-impregnated central venous catheters: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

This review evaluated the use of central venous catheters (CVCs) impregnated with rifampicin-based antimicrobial combinations to prevent catheter-related bloodstream infections and CVC colonisation. The authors concluded that rifampicin and minocycline-impregnated CVCs appear safe and effective, but more research on the potential for microbial resistance is needed. These conclusions are likely to be reliable.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2007

Effectiveness of systemic antifungal prophylaxis in patients with neutropenia after chemotherapy: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

The review concluded that systemic antifungal prophylaxis was associated with a reduction in proven candidal fungal infections and mortality attributed to these infections in patients with neutropenia after chemotherapy. There was no significant association between antifungal prophylaxis and overall mortality. The review was generally well conducted. The findings were limited by the quality of the included data.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2010

Antimicrobial central venous catheters in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis

This review assessed the efficacy of antimicrobial central venous catheters in adults, concluding that chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine or minocycline-rifampicin central venous catheters can be considered when the baseline incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infections is above institutional goals. The authors’ conclusions reflect the limitations of the evidence and are likely to be reliable.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2008

The clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of central venous catheters treated with anti-infective agents in preventing bloodstream infections: a systematic review and economic evaluation

This well-conducted review assessed the use of central venous catheters treated with anti-infective agents (AI-CVCs) in preventing catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI). The authors concluded that use of AI-CVCs reduced CRBSI rates for durations of five to 12 days and greater than 20 days with femoral or jugular vein insertion. The conclusions were likely to be reliable.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2008

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

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