Home > Search Results

About - Lidocaine

Injection: Causes numbness or loss of feeling in an area of your body. Given before and during surgery, childbirth, or dental work. Also treats emergency heart rhythm problems.

Into the eye: Used in the eye to cause numbness or loss of feeling before certain procedures. This medicine is a topical anesthetic (numbing medicine).

Intradermal: Used to numb the skin before drawing blood or placing an intravenous (IV) line.

On the skin: Relieves pain and numbs the skin.

On the skin: Treats nerve pain that is caused by herpes zoster or shingles.

Into the mouth: Relieves pain.

UsesSide effectsLatest evidence reviewsResearch summaries for consumersBrand names

Results: 1 to 20 of 200

Temporary pain in the lower extremities following spinal anaesthesia with lidocaine compared to other local anaesthetics

Lidocaine is the drug of choice for inducing spinal anaesthesia in ambulatory surgery because of its rapid onset of action, intense nerve blockade, and short duration of action. The possible side effects of spinal anaesthesia in adults, which develop after recovery, are backache, post‐dural puncture headache, and transient neurologic symptoms that are characterized by slight to severe pain in the buttocks and legs. TNS symptoms develop within a few hours and up to 24 hours after anaesthesia. They last, in most cases, up to two days. The present review shows that lidocaine is more likely to cause transient neurologic symptoms than bupivacaine, prilocaine, and procaine. However, these drugs produce prolonged local anaesthetic effects and therefore are not desirable for ambulatory patients. It is possible that the reintroduction of 2‐chloroprocaine will solve this lack of a suitable intrathecal local anaesthetic; confirmatory studies are needed.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Lidocaine for prevention of a sore throat following an operation under general anaesthetic

Sore throat is a common side effect of having a general anaesthetic. It is usually caused by the tube that is placed in the airways to make sure the person is breathing properly. It may be possible to use drugs, such as the local anaesthetic lidocaine, to prevent postoperative sore throat. We included 1232 patients from15 randomized controlled trials in this review. Lidocaine was either put into the cuff that makes sure the tube stays in place; sprayed onto the person's vocal cords; or used as a gel smeared on the end of the tube. In the included studies, lidocaine reduced the number of people who had a sore throat after surgery, which is conclusive evidence of its effectiveness. The possible adverse effects of using lidocaine were not reported in these studies.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Lidocaine for pain relief in people with burns

Burns are very common and sometimes fatal, and the pain associated with such injury is one of the most difficult types to relieve. The use of high‐dose opioid medications like morphine is common, but side effects are encountered. Alternative agents such as lidocaine, an anaesthetic, have been proposed. This is an update of the review of the same name first published in 2007.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Injection of lignocaine into a dislocated shoulder joint versus injection of a pain‐relieving drug with or without injection of a sedative drug into a vein for the purpose of manual manipulation of acute (less than 48 hours old) anterior (towards the front) displacement of a shoulder joint from its normal position.

Joint dislocation refers to displacement of the bones which form a joint away from their anatomical position. The shoulder is the most commonly dislocated joint managed in the emergency department (ED). When the dislocation occurs towards the front of the body, this is known as an anterior shoulder dislocation. It is called an acute anterior shoulder dislocation if the dislocation occurred with the previous 48 hours. Manually manipulating the displaced bones back to their normal position (manual reduction) is very painful. To allow for manual reduction, pain relief can be achieved either by injecting a local anaesthetic drug (for example, lignocaine) into the dislocated shoulder joint (intra‐articular lignocaine injection); or by injecting a pain killer with or without a sedative directly into the bloodstream through a vein (intravenous analgesia). The review authors searched the medical literature and identified five studies comparing these two methods. The studies included 211 patients with acute anterior shoulder dislocation; 113 patients underwent intra‐articular lignocaine injection and 98 underwent intravenous analgesia with sedation. The review found that there may be no difference in the immediate success of manual reduction of the dislocated shoulder between patients receiving intra‐articular lignocaine injection and those who received intravenous analgesia and sedation. However, intra‐articular lignocaine injection may be associated with fewer side effects and a shorter stay in the emergency department before discharge from hospital. Compared with intravenous analgesia and sedation, intra‐articular lignocaine may also be cheaper. However, the relatively small number of studies included in the review and the relatively small number of patients in each study means that the results of the review preclude definitive conclusions regarding the superiority of either method..

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Use of adrenaline with lidocaine for surgery on fingers and toes

Review question: We reviewed the evidence on the use of adrenaline with lidocaine for surgery on fingers and toes.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Topical lidocaine for neuropathic pain in adults

Neuropathic pain is pain coming from damaged nerves. It differs from pain messages carried along healthy nerves from damaged tissue (a fall, or cut, or arthritic knee). Neuropathic pain is treated by different medicines than pain from damaged tissue. Medicines like paracetamol or ibuprofen are usually not effective in neuropathic pain, while medicines that are sometimes used to treat epilepsy or depression can be very effective in some people with neuropathic pain. Other possible treatments include the use of local anaesthetic applied to the skin.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Anesthetic efficacy of articaine versus lidocaine for irreversible pulpitis: a meta-analysis

Bibliographic details: Xiao JL, Li YL, Ma B, Peng H, Shi QL, Yu ZH.  Anesthetic efficacy of articaine versus lidocaine for irreversible pulpitis: a meta-analysis. Chinese Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine 2010; 10(9): 1058-1062

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2010

Effects of lidocaine on preventing pain on injection of propofol: a meta-analysis

Bibliographic details: NiuL, Xuan Y, WAng J.  Effects of lidocaine on preventing pain on injection of propofol: a meta-analysis. Chinese Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine 2013; 13(9): 1129-1136 Available from: http://www.cjebm.org.cn/oa/DArticle.aspx?type=view&id=20130917

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

The pulpal anesthetic efficacy of articaine versus lidocaine in dentistry: a meta-analysis

BACKGROUND: The authors evaluated published evidence from controlled clinical trials regarding the efficacy of two local anesthetic solutions in providing successful pulpal anesthesia.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

Systemic administration of local anesthetic agents to relieve neuropathic pain

Intravenous lidocaine and oral derivatives relieve pain from damage to the nervous system (neuropathic pain). In early reports, intravenous lidocaine and its oral analogs mexiletine and tocainide relieved neuropathic pain, a type of pain caused by disease in the nervous system. However, the evidence was conflicting. The authors reviewed all randomized studies comparing these drugs with placebo or with other analgesics and found that: local anesthetics were superior to placebo in decreasing intensity of neuropathic pain; limited data showed no difference in efficacy or adverse effects between local anesthetics and carbamazepine, amantadine, gabapentin or morphine; local anesthetics had more adverse effects than placebo; and local anesthetics were safe.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Local corticosteroid injection for trigger finger

This summary of a Cochrane review presents what we know from research about the effect of corticosteroid injection for trigger finger.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Topical agents or dressings for reducing pain in venous leg ulcers

Venous leg ulcers are often painful, both during and between dressing changes, and during surgical removal of dead tissue (debridement). Dressings, topical creams and lotions have been promoted to reduce the pain of ulcers. Two trials tested a dressing containing ibuprofen, however, the pain measures and time frames reported were different. One trial indicated that pain relief achieved over 5 days with ibuprofen dressings could represent a clinically relevant reduction in pain. The other trial found no significant difference in the chance of pain relief, measured on the first night of treatment, for ibuprofen dressings compared with foam dressings. This trial, however, was small and participants were only followed for a few weeks, which may not be long enough to assess whether the dressing affects healing. There was evidence from five trials that a local anaesthetic cream (EMLA 5%) reduces the post‐procedural pain of debriding leg ulcers but there was insufficient evidence regarding any side effects of this cream and its impact on healing.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Pain relief for neonatal circumcision

Circumcision is a painful procedure frequently performed on newborn baby boys without using pain relief. Available treatments include dorsal penile nerve block (DPNB), which involves injecting anesthetic at the base of the penis. Ring block is another form of penile block. Locally applied anesthetic creams include EMLA, a water‐based cream including lidocaine and prilocaine. Based on 35 clinical trials involving 1,997 newborns, it can be concluded that DPNB and EMLA do not eliminate circumcision pain, but are both more effective than placebo or no treatment in diminishing it. Compared head to head, DPNB is substantially more effective than EMLA cream. Ring block and lidocaine creams other than EMLA also reduced pain but did not eliminate it. Trials of oral acetaminophen, sugar solutions, pacifiers, music, and other environmental modifications to reduce circumcision pain did not prove them effective. DPNB can cause minor bruising, bleeding, or swelling at the injection site. EMLA and other lidocaine creams can cause skin color changes or local skin irritation. There is a rare risk with lidocaine creams of causing methaemoglobinaemia (blue‐baby syndrome, where the baby's blood lacks sufficient oxygen). However, two trials of EMLA for circumcision pain relief measured methaemoglobin levels and found them normal. The circumcision procedure itself, especially without pain relief, can cause short term effects such as choking, gagging, and vomiting. Long term effects of circumcision without pain relief are not well understood. Strict comparability between trials was rare. Trials used a variety of indicators to measure baby's pain. Crying time, facial expression, and sweating palms can indicate infant pain, as can increased heart rate, breathing rate, and blood pressure. Levels of chemical indicators that can be part of a pain or stress response and are present in the blood or saliva are another gauge of pain levels. Also, procedures were not generally performed in just the same way in different trials. Type of clamp used (8sing a Mogen clamp can shorten the duration of the procedure), length of wait time after injection or application of anesthetic and procedure techniques varied.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Drugs in overactive bladder syndrome

Overactive bladder syndrome is characterised by a need to rush to urinate ‐ urine is passed frequently and there may be incontinence. The main treatment option is drug therapy. The most commonly used drugs are anticholinergics, but these often have side‐effects, such as dry mouth. This review sought evidence to compare other types of drugs with anticholinergics. Only a few, small‐scale randomised trials were found, many testing drugs that are no longer used clinically. The review found inadequate evidence to assess whether or not available alternative drugs are better or worse than anticholinergics in the management of people with symptoms of overactive bladder syndrome.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Interventions to reduce pain during sterilization by hysteroscopy

Sterilizing women to permanently prevent pregnancy can be done using abdominal surgery or using a hysteroscopy procedure. While the hysteroscopy procedure is less invasive than abdominal surgery, women may experience more pain with the hysteroscopy procedure when it is performed in a doctor's office. Concern about pain may influence women's decisions to have the hysteroscopy for sterilization procedures. This review evaluates the impact of interventions to reduce the pain associated with sterilization by hysteroscopy.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Topical anaesthesia using eye drops alone compared with a combination of eyedrops and anaesthesia within the eye for cataract surgery

There are many different options for anaesthesia during cataract surgery. Using anaesthetic eye drops (topical anaesthesia) has become an increasingly popular option in modern, rapid‐turnover day case cataract surgery as it is minimally invasive, cost effective, less prone to complications and provides for faster patient rehabilitation. Many surgeons who use topical anaesthesia supplement this with anaesthetic administered within the eye (intracameral) during the surgery. This review has found that the use of intracameral lidocaine as a supplement to topical anaesthesia significantly reduces intraoperative pain perception when compared to the use of topical anaesthesia alone. No significant difference was demonstrated between the groups receiving topical anaesthesia alone and topical eye drops combined with intracameral anaesthesia in terms of the need for supplemental anaesthesia, intraoperative adverse events or corneal toxicity. We conclude that the administration of intracameral anaesthetic during surgery is an effective and safe supplementation to topical anaesthesia.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Cyclobenzaprine drug treatment for myofascial pain in adults

Myofascial pain (MP) is a painful condition of the muscles characterized by pain transmitted from trigger points (TP) within connective tissue surrounding and separating muscles (myofascial structures). TP can be located where the pain is felt, or can be at a distance from it. Cyclobenzaprine, one of the drugs used to treat MP, is taken as a pill. It is a muscle relaxant, particularly used to improve quality of sleep and to reduce pain. It suppresses muscle spasms ‐ and so may prevent pain caused by MP ‐ without interfering with muscle function. The purpose of this review was to assess how effective cyclobenzaprine is at reducing pain and improving sleep in patients with MP. We searched extensively through scientific publications and found two trials, with a total of 79 participants. These tested cyclobenzaprine against another drug called clonazepam, and fake medication (placebo), or against injections of a local anesthetic called lidocaine. A total of 35 of the 79 participants in the two trials were given cyclobenzaprine. Cyclobenzaprine was slightly better than clonazepam and placebo at reducing jaw pain, but was no better at improving sleep quality. The results from the other trial were not scientifically reliable because of the small number of participants involved, but lidocaine injections seemed to reduce pain slightly better than cyclobenzaprine pills. Despite this result, it is likely that, because it is uncomfortable to receive any form of injection, people who suffer from MP will prefer to be treated with cyclobenzaprine pills. There were no life‐threatening adverse events associated with any of the medications studied. Further studies are needed to show whether cyclobenzaprine really works for treating MP, but at the moment doctors cannot say whether it is really useful.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Analgesia for amniocentesis

In addition to concerns about the risks of miscarriage after amniocentesis, women are also concerned about pain during and after the procedure. Currently, approaches for analgesia can be categorised in two broad categories ‐ non‐pharmacological and pharmacological agents. Their effect, or lack of it, is most commonly evaluated with visual analogue scale (VAS).

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Prolotherapy injections for chronic low‐back pain

Chronic low‐back pain is a very common problem for which there is currently no universally effective treatment. Patients with chronic low‐back pain have many treatment options and it is important for them to understand the evidence behind each treatment option they may be considering. Prolotherapy injections have been used to treat chronic low‐back pain for over 50 years but their use remains controversial. They involve repeatedly injecting ligaments with compounds such as dextrose (sugar) and lidocaine (anaesthetic) to help restart the body's natural healing process by causing controlled acute inflammation (swelling) in the areas injected. Proponents believe this leads to stronger ligaments that can better support the low‐back. Prolotherapy injections are often combined with other treatments such as spinal manipulation, exercises, and corticosteroid injections into tender muscles to maximize its effect.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

Quinine for muscle cramps

We reviewed the evidence about the effect of quinine on muscle cramps.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

See all (341)...

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...