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About - Leucovorin

By mouth: Prevents and treats side effects caused by certain kinds of medicines such as methotrexate (an anti-cancer medicine) or pyrimethamine (used to treat infections).

Injection: Helps prevent the side effects of a cancer medicine called methotrexate. Also treats a certain type of anemia caused by a lack of folic acid. Also used in supportive care of patients with colon cancer, and in the treatment of overdoses of certain medicines.

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Results: 1 to 20 of 76

Cisplatin plus 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin versus oxaliplatin plus 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin in the treatment of advanced gastric cancer: a systematic review

Bibliographic details: Wang N, Guan QL, Jiang L, Zhou X, Gao C, Yang HT.  Cisplatin plus 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin versus oxaliplatin plus 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin in the treatment of advanced gastric cancer: a systematic review. World Chinese Journal of Digestology 2009; 17(30): 3148-3154

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2009

First‐line treatment with anti‐cancer drugs for low risk gestational trophoblastic neoplasia

Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) is a rare but curable disease whereby a malignant tumour develops in the womb after a normal or molar pregnancy (where tissue develops in the womb instead of a baby). Women with GTN are classified as having low‐ or high‐risk GTN using a specific scoring system. Virtually all women with low‐risk GTN are cured by treatment with chemotherapy (anti‐cancer drugs) after undergoing dilatation and curettage (D&C) of the womb. Methotrexate and dactinomycin are the two most commonly used drugs for first‐line treatment of low‐risk GTN, although methotrexate is favoured in Europe and North America. Sometimes the first‐line treatment fails to cure the disease or has side‐effects that require it be discontinued, and a secondary treatment has to be used. If methotrexate is the first drug used, dactinomycin is usually the secondary treatment, and vice versa. We undertook this review as it was not clear which drug, if any, was more likely to cure low‐risk disease in the first instance. Furthermore, it was not clear which, if any, caused more side‐effects.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Folic acid or folinic acid for reducing side effects of methotrexate for people with rheumatoid arthritis

Researchers in The Cochrane Collaboration conducted a review of the effect of folic acid or folinic acid for people taking methotrexate for rheumatoid arthritis. After searching for all relevant studies, six studies with up to 624 people were included in the review. Their findings are summarized below.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Radioactive beads given in addition to chemotherapy does not improve control of cancer nor survival in patients with colorectal cancer and metastasis in the liver.

Bowel cancer commonly spreads to the liver. In most patients this cannot be removed by an operation and cure is not possible. Chemotherapy treatment can help control the growth of the cancer and improve survival. Radioactive beads can be injected into the blood vessels of the liver to try and control the cancer in the liver. In one study that had 21 participants, radioactive beads (injected into the blood vessels of the liver) given with chemotherapy (into the veins of the arm) was more effective at controlling the cancer and improving how long people lived than chemotherapy given on it's own. However, in this study more people who received the radioactive beads suffered from side effects and this study used an older type of chemotherapy that is less effective than the newer treatments that are now available. In a second study with 63 participants, radioactive beads were given with chemotherapy that was injected directly into the blood vessels of the liver. In this study there was no extra benefit in the control of cancer growth or survival for those participants who received radioactive beads in addition to the chemotherapy. More studies are needed with a particular focus on whether radioactive beads provides extra benefit when given with newer chemotherapy treatments, and if radioactive beads provide benefit when given on their own.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Interventions for untreated patients with AIDS‐associated non‐Hodgkin's lymphoma

Lymphoma is a cancer of the lymphatic system. There are two general types: Hodgkin's disease (HD) and non‐Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Non‐Hodgkin's lymphoma is the most common AIDS‐defining malignancy in HIV‐infected patients. The most frequent clinical presentations of NHL during AIDS are systemic illness with the compromise of the primary central nervous system and with primary effusion. In people with HIV infection, most lymphomas have originated in an aggressive B‐cell precursor and have a high‐to‐intermediate histology grade. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of different interventions for treating AIDS‐associated NHL found unclear evidence for efficacy and safety.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Combinations of anti‐cancer drugs to treat high‐risk cancers arising from the placenta, known as high‐risk gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN)

GTN is a cancer that most often arises after a molar pregnancy but can arise after any type of pregnancy. Molar pregnancies occur due to abnormal growth of placental tissue that is usually benign and treated by evacuation of the womb (D&C). However, in less than 10% of molar pregnancies in the UK, the growth remains after D&C and transforms into a cancer (GTN) that needs treatment with anti‐cancer drugs (chemotherapy). GTN can be low‐risk or high‐risk. Anti‐cancer drugs are very effective, especially in low‐risk GTN, which is usually cured with single‐drug treatment. However, high‐risk GTN needs to be treated with combinations of anti‐cancer drugs for the best effect. These drugs can produce toxic side effects that are more likely to occur when used in combination with each other. The most commonly administered drug combination is abbreviated as EMA/CO, which stands for Etoposide, Methotrexate, Actinomycin D, Cyclophosphamide and Oncovin® (vincristine), but several other combinations are also in use.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Modulation of fluorouracil by leucovorin in patients with advanced colorectal cancer: an updated meta-analysis

PURPOSE: The modulation of fluorouracil (FU) by folinic acid (leucovorin [LV]) has been shown to be effective in terms of tumor response rate in patients with advanced colorectal cancer, but a meta-analysis of nine trials previously published by our group failed to demonstrate a statistically significant survival difference between FU and FU-LV. We present an update of the meta-analysis, with a longer follow-up and the inclusion of 10 newer trials.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2004

Meta-analysis comparing the safety and efficacy of metastatic colorectal cancer treatment regimens, capecitabine plus irinotecan (CAPIRI) and 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin plus irinotecan (FOLFIRI)

The relative efficacy and safety of first-line metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) treatment regimens, capecitabine with irinotecan (CAPIRI) and 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin plus irinotecan (FOLFIRI), are not well defined. We identified and subsequently examined seven independent, randomized controlled clinical trials, performing a meta-analysis to compare these two treatment regimens. Using Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane Library (CENTRAL), and the American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting to search available literature until February 2014, we identified seven studies comparing safety and efficacy of CAPIRI and FOLFIRI in mCRC patients. These studies were pooled and evaluated for rates of progression-free survival (PFS), objective response rate (ORR), overall survival (OS), and diarrhea. CAPIRI and FOLFIRI demonstrated similar efficacy outcomes, though CAPIRI was associated with a higher incidence of diarrhea. CAPIRI and FOLFIRI are equally effective options for first-line treatment of mCRC.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Capecitabine plus irinotecan versus 5-FU/leucovorin plus irinotecan in the treatment of colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis

BACKGROUND: The XELIRI regimen and FOLFIRI regimen are used as the first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. A comparison of findings from different studies that examined the efficacy and safety of these 2 regimens often show conflicting results. This metaanalysis compared the XELIRI and FOLFIRI regimens in the treatment of mCRC.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Oral uracil-tegafur plus leucovorin vs fluorouracil bolus plus leucovorin for advanced colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis of five randomized controlled trials

This review concluded that oral uracil-tegafur or fluorouracil bolus with concomitant leucovorin resulted in similar overall survival and tumour response rates for advanced colorectal cancer. Uracil-tegafur was superior in terms of toxicity. The small number of trials, limitations in trial conduct, variable follow-up and review methods make these conclusions unreliable.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

Irinotecan or oxaliplatin combined with 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin as first-line therapy for advanced colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis

This review concluded that oxaliplatin combined with 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin had a higher response rate and longer overall survival than irinotecan combined with 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin as first-line therapy for colorectal cancer. The reliability of the authors' conclusions is uncertain and they should be interpreted with caution given several weaknesses in the review including the poor quality of included trials and potential for bias.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2010

A meta-analysis of chemotherapy regimen fluorouracil/leucovorin/oxaliplatin compared with fluorouracil/leucovorin in treating advanced colorectal cancer

The review found significantly improved response rate and progression-free survival with fluorouracil/leucovorin/oxaliplatin compared with fluorouracil/leucovorin chemotherapy in advanced colorectal cancer treatment, but the incidence of grade 3 or 4 toxicities was significantly higher in the fluorouracil/leucovorin/oxaliplatin group. Given potential limitations in the review process and the uncertain quality of included trials, the authors’ conclusions should be treated with caution.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2010

Efficacy of oxaliplatin plus capecitabine or infusional fluorouracil/leucovorin in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer: a pooled analysis of randomized trials

The authors concluded that capecitabine plus oxaliplatin regimens reduced response rates compared to infusional fluorouracil plus oxaliplatin in metastatic colorectal cancer, and that treatments had similar effects on progression-free and overall survival. The authors’ conclusions appeared to reflect the evidence, but the lack of reporting of review methods and trial quality make it difficult to be confident of their reliability.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2008

Irinotecan versus oxaplatin in combination with 5-FU/LV for advanced colorectal cancer: a systematic review

Bibliographic details: Wang T, Luo LL, Zhou QH, Wu TX.  Irinotecan versus oxaplatin in combination with 5-FU/LV for advanced colorectal cancer: a systematic review. Chinese Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine 2008; 8(1): 36-41

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2008

High-dose versus moderate-dose chemotherapy for osteosarcoma: a systematic review

Bibliographic details: Li T X, Bai J P, Xilin B, Jiang R B, He Z S, Huang W M, Wu T X.  High-dose versus moderate-dose chemotherapy for osteosarcoma: a systematic review. Chinese Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine 2006; 6(11): 826-832

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2006

Effect of folic or folinic acid supplementation on methotrexate-associated safety and efficacy in inflammatory disease: a systematic review

This review assessed the efficacy of folic acid supplementation in patients receiving methotrexate for inflammatory diseases, concluding that was an effective measure to reduce hepatic side-effects associated with methotrexate treatment. However, given the small number of included studies of uncertain quality, the authors' conclusions should be interpreted with caution.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2009

Capecitabine-based chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer

The review found that capecitabine-based chemotherapy demonstrated superior progression-free survival, less toxicity and equivalent overall survival and response rate compared to 5-fluorouracil-based therapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Uncertainties regarding the statistical analyses, the small number of studies for some comparisons and concerns over study quality mean that the authors' conclusions should be interpreted cautiously.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

A systematic review of FOLFOXIRI chemotherapy for the first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer: improved efficacy at the cost of increased toxicity

This review concluded that the combination of folinic acid, 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin and irinotecan (FOLFOXIRI) significantly improved progression-free survival, survival, response, and complete-removal rates, but it was more toxic than the standard combination of folinic acid, 5-fluorouracil, and irinotecan (FOLFIRI). These conclusions areunreliable primarily because they were derived from two small trials with methodological limitations.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

Drug Class Review: Neuropathic Pain: Final Update 1 Report [Internet]

We compared the effectiveness and harms of anticonvulsants, tricyclic antidepressants, serotonin–norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), and the lidocaine patchin adults with neuropathic pain.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: June 2011
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Colorectal Cancer: The Diagnosis and Management of Colorectal Cancer

This guideline is relevant to all healthcare professionals who come into contact with patients with colorectal cancer or suspected of having colorectal cancer, as well as to the patients themselves and their carers. It is also expected that the guideline will be of value to those involved in clinical governance in both primary and secondary care to help ensure that arrangements are in place to deliver appropriate care for the population covered by this guideline.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Collaborating Centre for Cancer (UK).

Version: November 2011
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