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Treats breathing problems caused by COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), including chronic bronchitis and emphysema. This medicine is a bronchodilator.

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Results: 1 to 20 of 22

Indacaterol and glycopyrronium (Ultibro Breezhaler Xoterna Breezhaler) for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): Overview

The drug combination indacaterol / glycopyrronium (trade name: Ultibro Breezhaler, Xoterna Breezhaler) has been approved in Germany since September 2013 for treating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in adults.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: February 17, 2014

Indacaterol for the treatment of people with stable COPD

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive lung disease that causes shortness of breath and impairs quality of life. In addition, sudden worsening of symptoms (acute exacerbations) may require additional treatment or hospitalisation and may result in further impairment in quality of life.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2015

Indacaterol for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: systematic review and meta-analysis

BACKGROUND: Inhaled bronchodilators are the first-line therapy for COPD. Indacaterol is a novel addition to existing long-acting bronchodilators.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Clinical benefit of fixed-dose dual bronchodilation with glycopyrronium and indacaterol once daily in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Long-acting bronchodilators are the preferred option for maintenance therapy of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the clinical studies evaluating the clinical efficacy of the once-daily fixed-dose dual bronchodilator combination of indacaterol and glycopyrronium bromide in patients suffering from COPD.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Indacaterol on dyspnea in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized placebo-controlled trials

BACKGROUND: Indacaterol is a novel, once-daily (od), inhaled, long-acting β(2)-agonist bronchodilator for maintenance treatment of airflow limitation in patients with COPD. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of indacaterol on dyspnea, using available randomized placebo-controlled trials.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Comparison of indacaterol with tiotropium or twice-daily long-acting beta-agonists for stable COPD: a systematic review

BACKGROUND: Bronchodilators are central to the symptomatic management of patients with COPD.Previous data have shown that inhaled indacaterol improved numerous clinical outcomes over placebo.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

Safety and efficacy of 12-week or longer indacaterol treatment in moderate-to-severe COPD patients: a systematic review

BACKGROUND: This is a meta-analysis of the safety and efficacy of indacaterol in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with treatment duration of ≥12 weeks.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Efficacy and safety of indacaterol and tiotropium in COPD patients according to dyspnoea severity

BACKGROUND: Guidelines for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) recommend that treatment choices be based partly on symptoms.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Efficacy and safety of a fixed-dose combination of indacaterol and glycopyrronium (QVA149) for the treatment of COPD: a systematic review

BACKGROUND: COPD guidelines recommend the combined use of inhaled, long-acting β2-agonists and long-acting muscarinic antagonists if symptoms are not improved by a single agent. This systematic review assessed the efficacy and safety of the fixed-dose combination of the long-acting β2-agonist indacaterol and long-acting muscarinic antagonist glycopyrronium (QVA149) compared with its monocomponents (glycopyrronium and indacaterol) and tiotropium for the treatment of moderate to severe COPD.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Once-daily long-acting beta-agonists for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: an indirect comparison of olodaterol and indacaterol

PURPOSE: In the absence of head-to-head clinical trials comparing the once-daily, long-acting beta2-agonists olodaterol and indacaterol for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), an indirect treatment comparison by systematic review and synthesis of the available clinical evidence was conducted.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2014

Efficacy of once-daily indacaterol 75 mug relative to alternative bronchodilators in COPD: a study level and a patient level network meta-analysis

BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to evaluate the comparative efficacy of indacaterol 75 μg once daily (OD), tiotropium 18 μg OD, salmeterol 50 μg twice daily (BID), formoterol 12 μg BID, and placebo for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) based on individual patient data (IPD) from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) from the indacaterol trial program and aggregate data (AD) identified from a systematic review of RCTs.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

Comparative efficacy of indacaterol 150mug and 300mug versus fixed-dose combinations of formoterol + budesonide or salmeterol + fluticasone for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a network meta-analysis

This review concluded that indacaterol was expected to have similar effects on health status and breathlessness to salmeterol/fluticasone and similar effects on health status to formoterol/budesonide. It was also expected to be at least as good as formoterol/budesonide, and similar to salmeterol/fluticasone for lung function. These conclusions reflect the data presented and are appropriately cautious.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

Drugs assessed by IQWiG: Overview

Since early 2011, the added benefit of most medications containing new active ingredients must be assessed as soon as they enter the market in Germany. The most important results of the IQWiG reviews are summarized here.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: March 2, 2015

Which long‐acting inhaled drugs, used alone or in combination, are the most effective for people with COPD?

Inhaled drugs for COPD have been shown to relieve symptoms, improve quality of life and prevent or treat flare‐ups. Treatment with these inhaled drugs tends to begin with one inhaler, and additional therapies are introduced as necessary. For persistent or worsening symptoms, long‐acting inhaled drugs taken once or twice daily are preferred over short‐acting ones. Several Cochrane reviews have looked at the risks and benefits of specific long‐acting inhaled therapies compared with placebo or other treatments. However for patients and clinicians, it is important to understand the benefits of these treatments relative to each other, and whether a particular type of inhaled therapy is more beneficial than the others.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Tiotropium bromide for COPD: Executive summary of final report A05-18, Version 1.0

The aims of this report were ■ to assess the benefit of tiotropium bromide compared to placebo or other pharmacological treatment options, alone or in combination, and ■ the comparative benefit assessment of the two forms of application of tiotropium bromide, namely the HandiHaler and the Respimat, in each case for the long-term inhalation treatment of patients with COPD with respect to patient-relevant outcomes.

Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care: Executive Summaries [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: June 26, 2012

Is it better to take a combination of tiotropium and long‐acting beta2‐agonists than either inhaler alone for the treatment of COPD?

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a lung disease which includes the conditions chronic bronchitis and emphysema. The symptoms include breathlessness and a chronic cough. COPD is an irreversible disease that is usually brought on by airway irritants, such as smoking or inhaled dust.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Tiotropium versus long‐acting beta2‐agonists (LABAs) in the management of COPD

Tiotropium is an inhaled medication that helps open the airways (bronchodilator) and is used to manage persistent symptoms of COPD. We found seven studies including 12,223 participants that compared tiotropium with long‐acting beta2‐agonists (LABAs), which are another type of bronchodilator. This systematic review found that currently there is insufficient evidence to suggest which of these treatments provides greater long‐term benefit in quality of life. Furthermore, both treatments had similar effects on symptoms, lung function and death rates.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Drug Class Review: Quick-relief Medications for Asthma: Final Report Update 1 [Internet]

Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways. In susceptible individuals this inflammation causes recurrent episodes of wheezing, breathlessness, cough, and other symptoms. Asthma medications fall into 2 general classes: medications for long-term control and medications for quick relief of airflow obstruction and symptoms. Medications for quick relief of bronchoconstriction and acute symptoms include short-acting beta2-agonists and anticholinergics. The purpose of this review is to compare the benefits and harms of short-acting beta2-agonists and ipratropium bromide used for quick relief of asthma symptoms.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: October 2008
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The safety of long-acting beta2-agonists in the treatment of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

BACKGROUND: Inhaled long-acting bronchodilators are the mainstay of pharmacotherapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Both the twice-daily long-acting β(2)-adrenoceptor agonists (LABAs) salmeterol and formoterol and the once-daily LABA indacaterol are indicated for use in COPD. This review examines current evidence for the safety of LABAs in COPD, focusing on their effect on exacerbations and deaths.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Effect of long-acting beta-agonists on the frequency of COPD exacerbations: a meta-analysis

This well-conducted review found that long-acting beta-agonists reduced the frequency of moderate and severe exacerbations in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Salmeterol, formoterol and indacaterol each significantly reduced COPD exacerbations compared with placebo. The results are likely to be reliable, but the conclusions on severe exacerbations should be considered tentative given potential publication bias.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

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