Home > Search Results

About - Desmopressin

By mouth: Treats diabetes insipidus. Also treats bedwetting problems.

Injection: Treats bleeding disorders. Also treats diabetes insipidus.

Into the nose: Treats thirst and frequent urination caused by diabetes insipidus or brain injuries. Treats bleeding disorders such as hemophilia A and von Willebrand disease.

Nasal route: Desmopressin nasal spray is used to treat central cranial diabetes insipidus.

UsesSide effectsLatest evidence reviewsResearch summaries for consumersBrand names

Results: 1 to 20 of 23

A systematic review: the use of desmopressin for treatment and prophylaxis of bleeding disorders in pregnancy

Desmopressin (DDAVP) is commonly used for treatment and prevention of bleeding complications in patients with bleeding disorders including haemophilia A, von Willebrand's disease (VWD) and other less common disorders. This article reviews the current evidence for the use of DDAVP in pregnancy to clarify its efficacy and safety with regard to maternal and foetal outcome. A search of the literature found 30 studies that reported DDAVP use in pregnancy for prophylaxis or treatment of bleeding complications with 216 pregnancies reported in total. The most common indication was prophylaxis for prevention of bleeding during pregnancy and postpartum haemorrhage. DDAVP was used successfully in the first and early second trimester for bleeding prophylaxis in 50 pregnancies. No postpartum bleeding complications were reported in 167 out of 172 pregnancies when DDAVP was used for peripartum haemostatic cover. Twenty-nine studies reported no significant adverse events as a result of treatment with DDAVP. One case of water intoxication seizure and one case of premature labour following the use of DDAVP was reported in a single study. Other maternal side effects included facial flushing and headache and were reported by one study. These side effects were generally well tolerated by patients. There were no other significant adverse events reported in any of the studies as a result of DDAVP use. Foetal outcome was recorded in ten studies with no adverse foetal outcomes. In conclusion, this review shows that DDAVP in selected cases is effective in reducing bleeding complications associated with pregnancy and childbirth with a good safety record. Further research is needed to confirm these findings as they are based on the currently available evidence from small studies and case series only.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

Desmopressin reduces transfusion needs after surgery: a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials

This review assessed the impact of desmopressin on transfusion needs after surgery and concluded that blood loss and transfusion requirements were reduced, without reducing the proportion of patients who received transfusions. Given the small sample sizes, heterogeneity between trials and uncertainty over trial quality, the authors' conclusions should be interpreted with caution.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2008

What treatments are there for bedwetting?

Bedwetting is more common among children and teenagers than you might think. Regular “accidents” in the middle of the night can be troubling for the entire family. But the problem usually goes away on its own over time. There are various things you can do to help your child in the meantime. Regardless of the approach you choose, the main thing you will need is patience.There is a big market for products and remedies designed to help with bedwetting. Some of these products work, but many are overpriced and advertised with false claims. Because just about every child will eventually make it through the night without wetting the bed on their own, it is difficult to tell whether a particular approach actually helped, or whether the child’s bladder control developed on its own during that time.Research has shown that only a few of these approaches are helpful. In particular, these include electronic alarm systems such as alarm sensors in the child’s underwear or on special mats, as well as certain types of medication. It is important to keep in mind that none of these methods can guarantee that a child will stop wetting the bed sooner, but some can help in at least some children.When is it a good idea to consider treatment? Many children who still wet the bed at the age of five end up stopping on their own by the time they are seven. The problem often becomes more urgent when a child starts school. As well as the child’s age, other factors also play a role when deciding for or against treatment: How much of a problem is the bedwetting for the child and parents? Does the child want to stop wetting the bed? Is he or she willing to give treatment a try?If a child’s self-confidence is noticeably affected by the bedwetting, treatment may be a good idea even if the incidents are quite rare, or if the treatment only leads to a small improvement. And there is little point in trying a treatment if the child does not want to, or is not yet mature enough.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: February 6, 2014

Nocturnal Enuresis: The Management of Bedwetting in Children and Young People

This guideline aims to provide advice on the assessment and management of children and young people with bedwetting. The guidance is applicable to children and young people up to 19 years with the symptom of bedwetting. It has been common practice to define enuresis as abnormal from 5 years and only to consider children for treatment when they are 7 years. While the prevalence of symptoms decreases with age the guideline scope did not specify a younger age limit in order to consider whether there were useful interventions that might be of benefit to children previously excluded from advice and services.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: 2010
Show search results within this document

Efficacy and safety of desmopressin for treatment of nocturia: a systematic review and meta-analysis of double-blinded trials

PURPOSE: The purpose of this analysis was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of desmopressin for the treatment of nocturia.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

The efficacy of alarm therapy versus desmopressin therapy in the treatment of primary mono-symptomatic nocturnal enuresis: a systematic review

Aim To investigate the efficacy of alarm therapy versus desmopressin therapy in treating primary mono-symptomatic nocturnal enuresis (PMNE).

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Use of desmopressin to reduce the need for blood transfusions in patients who do not suffer from congenital bleeding disorders.

Risks of infection from transfused blood given by an unrelated donor are minimal when blood is screened by a competent transfusion service but concerns still remain. Techniques are available to reduce the need for a transfusion. The review of trials found that there is no convincing evidence that desmopressin reduces the need for blood transfusion in patients who do not have congenital bleeding disorders and are undergoing non‐urgent or elective surgery. Other strategies, such as the use of anti‐fibrinolytic drugs, may be more effective but are not included in this review.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2008

Desmopressin acetate (DDAVP) for preventing and treating acute bleeds during pregnancy in women with congenital bleeding disorders

Congenital bleeding disorders cause problems with bleeding during pregnancy, labour and delivery. Bleeding complications in women with congenital bleeding disorders are an important cause of disease and death linked to childbirth. Agents to stop the flow of blood are used for women with these bleeding disorders during pregnancy. Desmopressin acetate is a drug used to effectively increase the concentration of factor VIII in the blood and to increase the clumping together of platelets to stop bleeding. It does not come from human plasma and it carries no risk of infection. It might be a precious resource in patients with von Willebrand disease, haemophilia A or congenital platelet disorders to prevent and treat bleeding episodes related to pregnancy. We did not find any randomised controlled trials assessing desmopressin acetate in this group of patients. Given the ethical considerations, future randomised controlled trials are unlikely. Evidence is needed to show the risks and benefits of desmopressin acetate when used to prevent and treat bleeding during pregnancy in women with congenital bleeding disorders. While there is evidence from observational trials that shows the drug is effective in stopping and preventing bleeding, we conclude that there is still a need to generate other high quality controlled evidence.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Desmopressin for bedwetting in children

Bedwetting is a distressing and stressful condition for children and their families. Some children take longer than others to stop bedwetting. Up to 20% still wet at the age of five years, but by the age of 16 only 2% or less do so. Desmopressin is a drug which reduces bedwetting by reducing the amount of urine produced at night. It is taken before bedtime, and the children are also advised not to drink more than 240 ml (8 ounces) of fluid in the evening. However, it only works on the nights when it is used, so does not cure the problem in the long term.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Drug treatment for children with bedwetting (nocturnal enuresis) but not including the drug types desmopressin or tricyclics

Bedwetting (nocturnal enuresis) is the involuntary loss of urine at night without an underlying organic disease as the cause. It can result in social problems, sibling teasing and lowered self esteem. It affects around 15% to 20% of five‐year olds, and up to 2% of adults. Many different types of drugs have been used to treat children with bed wetting. There is not enough reliable evidence to show that drugs other than desmopressin or tricyclics reduce bedwetting in children during treatment when used in isolation, despite their risk of unwanted side effects. In other Cochrane reviews, alarms triggered by wetting, desmopressin and tricyclic drugs have been shown to work during treatment. However, alarms have a more sustained effect than desmopressin and tricyclics after treatment has finished. The adverse effects of alarm therapy (tiredness and waking other members of the family) are relatively benign and self limiting compared with the adverse effects of drugs. One class of drugs (anticholinergic drugs) appears to improve the efficacy of other established treatments such as tricyclics, bedwetting alarms and desmopressin. The cost of treating children with bedwetting with alarm therapy or drugs may vary in different countries.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Medical therapies for treating heavy menstrual bleeding in women with bleeding disorders

Heavy menstrual bleeding is one of the most common symptoms in women with bleeding disorders. A sizeable population of women with heavy menstrual bleeding are affected by either inherited or acquired bleeding disorders and at the time of presentation these women are considerably younger than the women who suffer from this due to other reasons. Since heavy menstrual bleeding starts at the very onset of menarche and continues throughout reproductive life, the quality of life of these women is severely affected and they are at an increased risk of developing iron‐deficiency anaemia.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Alarm interventions for nocturnal enuresis (bedwetting) in children

Night‐time bedwetting is common in childhood, and can cause stigma, stress and inconvenience. The review of trials found 56 studies involving 3257 children. Alarm interventions reduce night‐time bed wetting in about two thirds of children during treatment, and about half the children remained dry after stopping using the alarm. Alarms take longer to reduce bedwetting than desmopressin, but their effects continue after treatment in half the children who use alarms. So alarms are better in the long term than treatment with desmopressin or tricyclic drugs. Overlearning (giving children extra fluids at bedtime after successfully becoming dry using an alarm) and dry bed training (getting children to go to the toilet repeatedly and changing their own sheets when they wet) may reduce the relapse rate. There are no serious side‐effects, which can occur with drug treatment. However, children need more supervision and time from other family members at first. There was not enough evidence with which to compare alarms with other non‐drug treatments. Because some of the studies were of poor quality, better research comparing alarms with other treatments is needed, including follow‐up to measure relapse rates.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Tricyclic drugs for bedwetting in children

Night‐time bedwetting is common in childhood, and can cause stigma, stress and inconvenience. The review examined 58 trials of tricyclic drugs which included 3721 children. Tricyclics are antidepressants, but probably work because of one of their side effects (affecting the messages sent to the bladder by the nerves). The one most commonly used is imipramine, which can be used for up to three months. Tricyclic drugs reduce bedwetting by about one wet night per week while being used and about a fifth of the children become dry. However, they do not work once the children stop using them. Compared with the other commonly used drug, desmopressin, tricyclics are less expensive but have more side‐effects. A particular concern is tricyclic overdose, which can be serious. Bed alarms are more expensive than tricyclics and more bother to families to use but about half the children remain dry after alarm treatment has finished, and they do not have the side‐effects of the drugs.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Complementary treatments such as hypnosis, psychotherapy, acupuncture, chiropractic and medicinal herbs for bedwetting in children

Night‐time bedwetting is common in childhood, and can cause stigma, stress and inconvenience. Alarms offer the best chance of cure, and desmopressin may be used to reduce or stop wet nights during treatment. Simple behavioural methods such as rewards also help, especially as first line treatment. People often use complementary methods to treat their children, but the review of trials did not provide good evidence to support this. There was no reliable information comparing complementary methods with established effective methods such as alarms and desmopressin. Further research is needed.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2012

Management of the brain-dead organ donor: a systematic review and meta-analysis

BACKGROUND: The shortage of organs is a limitation for transplantation, making the care of potential organ donors an important issue. The present systematic review and meta-analysis was carried out to assess the efficacy of interventions to stabilize hemodynamics in brain-dead donors or to improve organ function and outcomes of transplantation.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2013

Aptrotinin and tranexamic acid may show promise in decreasing blood loss and blood transfusion requirements

Blood loss during liver resection (partial removal of liver) is one of the important factors affecting the post‐operative complications of patients. Allogeneic blood transfusion (using blood donated by a different individual) is associated with increased morbidity and lower survival in patients with liver cancer. This systematic review was aimed at determining whether any medical treatment decreased blood loss and decreased allogeneic blood transfusion requirements in patients undergoing liver resections. This systematic review included six trials with 849 patients. All trials had high risk of bias ('systematic error') as well of play of chance ('random error'). The trials included comparison of medicines (such as aprotinin, desmopressin, recombinant factor VIIa, antithrombin III, and tranexamic acid) with controls (no medicines). There was no difference in the death or complications due to surgery or long‐term survival in any of the comparisons. Fewer patients required transfusion of blood donated by others when aprotinin or tranexamic acid were compared to controls not receiving the interventions. The other comparisons did not decrease the transfusion requirements. However, there is a high risk of type I errors (erroneously concluding that an intervention is beneficial when it is actually not beneficial) and type II errors (erroneously concluding that an intervention is not beneficial when it is actually beneficial) because of the few trials included and the small sample size in each trial as well as the inherent risk of bias (systematic errors). Aprotinin and tranexamic acid show promise in the reduction of blood transfusion requirements in liver resections. Further randomised clinical trials with low risk of bias (systematic errors) and low risk of play of chance (random errors) which assess clinically important outcomes (such as death and complications due to operation) are necessary to assess any pharmacological interventions aimed at decreasing blood transfusion and blood transfusion requirements in liver resections. Trials need to be designed to assess the effect of a combination of different interventions in liver resections.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2009

Complex behavioural and educational interventions for bedwetting (nocturnal enuresis) in children

Night‐time bedwetting is common in childhood, and can cause stigma, stress and inconvenience. Bed alarms are the treatments which currently appear to work best in the long term. Complex interventions such as dry bed training can also be tried. This involves, as well as using an alarm to wake the child after he or she has wet the bed, getting them to go to the toilet repeatedly and changing their own sheets. The review found 18 trials in 1174 children who had received this sort of training or another treatment. Although an alarm on its own was better than the dry bed training on its own, there was some evidence that using them together might reduce the relapse rate after stopping alarm treatment, and without the adverse effects of drug treatment. However, both using an alarm and dry bed training needs time and effort from the child and family. There was not enough research comparing complex interventions with other techniques.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2008

Enuresis alarm treatment

This review aimed to determine the effectiveness of treatment for childhood nocturnal enuresis. Sixty-five percent of children using alarms in a subset of 20 studies were reported to have achieved 14 consecutive dry nights. However, the diversity, possible poor generalisability and the poor quality of many of the studies should be considered when interpreting the authors' findings.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2005

The Management of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms in Men [Internet]

The guideline covers men (18 and over) with a clinical working diagnosis of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Options for conservative, pharmacological, surgical, and complementary or alternative treatments are considered in terms of clinical and cost effectiveness.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: 2010
Show search results within this document

Bedwetting: Overview

Bedwetting is more common among children and teenagers than you might think. Regular “accidents” in the middle of the night can be troubling for the entire family. But the problem usually goes away on its own over time. There are various things you can do to help your child in the meantime.

Informed Health Online [Internet] - Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG).

Version: February 6, 2014

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

See all (111)...

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...