Home > Search Results
  • We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information

Oral route: Acetaminophen and codeine oral suspension is used to relieve mild to moderate pain.

By mouth: Treats mild to moderately severe pain. This medicine contains a narcotic pain reliever.

UsesSide effectsLatest evidence reviewsResearch summaries for consumersBrand names

Results: 1 to 20 of 88

Codeine-acetaminophen versus nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the treatment of post-abdominal surgery pain: a systematic review of randomized trials

This review compared the efficacy and safety of NSAIDs with acetaminophen plus codeine for pain control after post-laporotomy pain. The authors concluded that NSAIDs appeared to have an overall better risk-benefit ratio than acetaminophen plus codeine for postpartum pain. Given that review scoping decisions and study selection were not fully explained, the reliability of the conclusion is unclear.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2009

Single dose oral paracetamol (acetaminophen) plus codeine for postoperative pain relief in adults

Pain is commonly experienced after surgical procedures, and is not always well controlled. Combining analgesics from different classes has the potential to provide adequate pain relief with reduced dose‐dependent adverse events. This review assessed data from twenty‐six studies comparing paracetamol plus codeine with placebo, and fourteen studies comparing paracetamol plus codeine with the same dose of paracetamol alone. The combination provided effective pain relief for about 40% of participants experiencing moderate to severe pain after an operation with 600 to 650 mg paracetamol plus 60 mg codeine, the dose most commonly used in these studies, and about 50% of participants with 800 to 1000 mg paracetamol plus 60 mg codeine, the dose most commonly used in clinical practice. The addition of codeine provided effective pain relief to about 10% more participants than the same dose of paracetamol alone. These single dose studies did not associate paracetamol plus codeine with any serious side effects.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Use of antimotility drugs (Loperamide, Diphenoxylate, Codeine) to control prolonged diarrhoea in people with HIV/AIDS.

People with HIV/AIDS often develop prolonged diarrhoea which are sometimes not caused by infections. This is more so in the sub‐Saharan Africa where drugs for controlling HIV itself i.e. antiretroviral drugs (ARV) may not be widely available or affordable. prolonged diarrhoea often results in prolonged illness and death due to loss of fluids, if not treated effectively and on time. Antimotility drugs and adsorbents are readily available and are used to try to control this condition while efforts are made to receive ARVs. We did not find enough evidence to support or refute their use in controlling this condition.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2008

Single dose oral codeine, as a single agent, for acute postoperative pain in adults

This review assessed evidence from 2411 adults with moderate to severe postoperative pain in studies comparing single doses of codeine 60 mg with placebo. The number of individuals achieving a clinically useful amount of pain relief (at least 50%) with codeine compared to placebo was low. In all types of surgery combined, 12 participants would need to be treated with codeine 60 mg for one to experience this amount of pain relief who would not have done so with placebo. The need for use of additional analgesia within 4 to 6 hours was 38% with codeine compared with 46% with placebo, and the mean time to the use of additional analgesia was only slightly longer with codeine (2.7 hours) than with placebo (2 hours). More individuals experienced adverse events with codeine than with placebo, but the difference was not significant and none were serious or led to withdrawal. Other commonly used analgesics, alone and in combination with codeine 60 mg, provide better pain relief. Higher doses of codeine were not investigated in these studies.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

Single dose oral ibuprofen plus codeine for acute postoperative pain in adults

Both ibuprofen and codeine are analgesics, but they work by different mechanisms. We know that in some circumstances combining different analgesics in the same tablet gives good pain relief to more people than either analgesic alone, at the same dose. This review looked at how good the combination of ibuprofen and codeine was in relieving moderate or severe pain after surgery. Ibuprofen 400 mg plus high doses of codeine (25.6 mg to 60 mg) provided effective pain relief for over 6 in 10 (64%) of participants, compared with just under 2 in 10 (18%) of participants with placebo. Adverse events occurred at similar rates with combinations and placebo in these single dose studies, and no serious adverse events or withdrawals due to adverse events occurred with the combination.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2013

Codeine, alone and with paracetamol (acetaminophen), for cancer pain

Codeine is an opioid medication commonly used worldwide to treat pain including cancer pain. Oral codeine, either alone or in combination with paracetamol, provided good pain relief for some people with cancer pain, based on limited amounts of information.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Impact of morphine, fentanyl, oxycodone or codeine on patient consciousness, appetite and thirst when used to treat cancer pain

Care pathways are packages of care designed to ensure patients have appropriate and effective care. They are commonly used, and often produce good results, but they can also be used as a tick box solution that acts as a barrier to good care. Care pathways have been used to ensure appropriate care for dying people in hospice settings. One, the Liverpool Care Pathway, devised for use in hospices, has been used in general hospital settings to care for dying patients. Its use has been criticised. A review of the use of end‐of‐life care pathways in the NHS in the UK recommended they be discontinued, one reason being that they were being misused.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2014

Comparing Long-Acting Opioids

How do long-acting opioids compare in treating chronic non-cancer pain?

PubMed Clinical Q&A [Internet] - National Center for Biotechnology Information (US).

Version: November 30, 2011

Acute Migraine Treatment in Emergency Settings [Internet]

To compare the effectiveness and safety of parenteral pharmacological interventions to treat migraine headaches in adults presenting to the emergency department (ED).

Comparative Effectiveness Reviews - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).

Version: November 2012
Show search results within this document

Drug Class Review: Drugs for Fibromyalgia: Final Original Report [Internet]

We compared the effectiveness and harms of tricyclic antidepressants, serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, noradrenergic and specific serotonergic reuptake inhibitor, norepinephrine and dopamine reuptake inhibitor, serotonin receptor antagonist, antiepileptic drugs, and skeletal muscle relaxants in adults with fibromyalgia.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: April 2011
Show search results within this document

Drug Class Review: Newer Antiemetics: Final Report Update 1 [Internet]

Nausea and vomiting are major concerns for patients undergoing chemotherapy, radiation therapy and surgery with general anesthesia. Risk factors associated with chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting include emetogenicity of the chemotherapy regimen, dose, speed of intravenous infusion, female gender, age under 50 years, history of ethanol consumption, and history of prior chemotherapy. Factors predictive of radiation therapy-induced nausea and vomiting include site of irradiation (in particular, total body irradiation and radiation fields that include the abdomen), total field size, dose per fraction, age, and predisposition for emesis (history of sickness during pregnancy or motion sickness). Female gender, a history of motion sickness or prior postoperative nausea and vomiting, nonsmoking status, and use of postoperative opioids have been suggested as factors predictive of postoperative nausea and vomiting. The objective of this review was to evaluate the comparative effectiveness and harms of newer antiemetic drugs including the 5-HT3 and NK-1 antagonists.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: January 2009
Show search results within this document

Drug Class Review: Long-Acting Opioid Analgesics: Final Update 6 Report [Internet]

We compared the effectiveness and harms of long-acting opioids and of long-acting opioids compared with short-acting opioids in adults with chronic noncancer pain.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: July 2011
Show search results within this document

The Management of Hip Fracture in Adults [Internet]

Although hip fracture is predominantly a phenomenon of later life, it may occur at any age in people with osteoporosis or osteopenia, and this guidance is applicable to adults across the age spectrum. Skills in its management have, however been accrued, researched and reported especially by collaborative teams specialising in the care of older people (using the general designation ‘orthogeriatrics’). These skills are applicable in hip fracture irrespective of age, and the guidance includes recommendations that cover the needs of younger patients by drawing on such skills in an organised manner.

NICE Clinical Guidelines - National Clinical Guideline Centre (UK).

Version: 2011
Show search results within this document

Drug Class Review: Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs): Final Update 4 Report [Internet]

We compared the effectiveness and harms of oral or topical nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in the treatment of chronic pain from osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, soft tissue pain, back pain, and ankylosing spondylitis.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: November 2010
Show search results within this document

Drug Class Review: Neuropathic Pain: Final Update 1 Report [Internet]

We compared the effectiveness and harms of anticonvulsants, tricyclic antidepressants, serotonin–norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), and the lidocaine patchin adults with neuropathic pain.

Drug Class Reviews - Oregon Health & Science University.

Version: June 2011
Show search results within this document

Efficacy and tolerability of oxycodone in moderate-severe cancer-related pain: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

The authors concluded that oxycodone was superior to other strong opioids including morphine sulphate, codeine and tramadol, supporting its use as an opioid for cancer-related pain in China. This was a well-conducted review and the results are likely reliable.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

Pain control in first-trimester and second-trimester medical termination of pregnancy: a systematic review

BACKGROUND: Pain is a predictable feature of medical abortion in both the first trimester and the second trimester. We sought to evaluate optimal analgesia regimens during medical abortion.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2011

Pain relief for after pains (uterine cramping/involution) after the baby's birth

Women may experience cramping pain and discomfort following the birth of their baby as the uterus contracts and returns to its pre‐pregnancy size. These after pains are caused by involutionary contractions and usually last for two to three days after childbirth. They are more evident for women who have previously had a baby. Breastfeeding stimulates the uterus to contract and increases the severity of after birth pains. This review is about pain relief for after pains experienced by women following vaginal birth.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2011

A systematic review of randomized trials on the effectiveness of opioids for cancer pain

BACKGROUND: In all recommended guidelines put forth for the treatment of cancer pain, opioids continue to be an important part of a physician's armamentarium. Though opioids are used regularly for cancer pain, there is a paucity of literature proving efficacy for long-term use. Cancer is no longer considered a "terminal disease"; 50% to 65% of patients survive for at least 2 years, and there are about 12 million cancer survivors in the United States. There is a concern about side effects, tolerance, abuse and addiction with long-term opioid use and a need to evaluate the effectiveness of opioids for cancer pain.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews [Internet] - Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK).

Version: 2012

Interventions for cough in patients with cancer

Cough is a distressing symptom in patients with cancer and difficult to manage in practice. Hence, the aim of this review is to assess and synthesise the available literature in the management of cough in cancer patients, in order to improve on practice recommendations. Studies with chemotherapy or radiotherapy were excluded. An extensive literature search yielded 17 studies for evaluation. Eight of them were about the use of brachytherapy (a technique were a radiation source is placed inside the bronchus in the lung or next to the area requiring treatment), use of laser resection or photodynamic therapy (a treatment that uses a drug plus a special type of light to kill cancer cells). Nine more studies assessed the effects of a number of different medication, including codeine and morphine. Overall, the research was of poor quality with significant methodological problems, hence no credible evidence is available in the literature to guide practice. Acknowledging these limitations, brachytherapy was found to be helpful in a variety of radiation doses in selected patients. Also some pharmacological treatments were found to be helpful particularly with regards to morphine, codeine, dihydrocodeine, levodropropizine, sodium cromoglycate and butamirate citrate linctus (a cough syrup), although all studies had significant risk of bias and some reported side effects. No practice recommendations could be drawn from this review. There is an urgent need to increase the number and quality of studies evaluating the effects of interventions in the management of cough in cancer.

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet] - John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Version: 2010

Systematic Reviews in PubMed

See all (129)...

Recent Activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...